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Discussion Starter #1
Hey y’all. My 1996 Camry LE 2.2L, is slipping and sliding all over the place. I’ve replaced the tie rods in the front, but as often happens, more things become apparent when you fix something.

as far as “hard” parts, the rear lateral links (I think they’re called) are both bent somehow, and need replacing, but if I’m going in, I might as well do the bushings and whatever else I can do cheaply at the same time. Any thoughts?
305375
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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those bent means our rear wheels have probably an unsafe amount of toe out, which would make the car very twitchy handling, most likely a stupid tow truck tie down did that damage

definitely replace those two, and if the bushings look badly worn then the two in front of them as well (note these two are easy to replace, the forward ones need the subframe dropped to get the long bolts out), and while you have the rear apart for that work you can decide if the trailing arms bushings are OK or not

You can buy OEM parts for OEM ride when done, or you can buy Rock Auto parts and get most of the benefit at 1/2 the cost.

Frankly, except for those two arms that were ruined by someone, the rest of the arms are probably good as new (steel) and only need the bushings replaced, which are not available separately from Toyota, but maybe aftermarket ones will be close enough to be worth the effort, for less money than replacing the whole arm.
 

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Yes, do the whole thing.I just did the whole front and some of the rear suspension on my 2003 Solara. I experienced the same crappy ride when driving around. Initially I was only going to replace the sway bar links but as soon as I got under there I saw that pretty much everything needed to be replaced. I couldn't just replace the sway bar links but have sloppy, worn out lower ball joints and cracked/dry bushings. I know that money is an issue and it's certainly the case for me as well. I ended up getting a cheapo front end kit for around $100 (lower control arms, ball joints, inner tie rods, etc). Yes they are cheapo parts and longevity is questionable but you'll definitely appreciate the better handling.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
those bent means our rear wheels have probably an unsafe amount of toe out, which would make the car very twitchy handling, most likely a stupid tow truck tie down did that damage

definitely replace those two, and if the bushings look badly worn then the two in front of them as well (note these two are easy to replace, the forward ones need the subframe dropped to get the long bolts out), and while you have the rear apart for that work you can decide if the trailing arms bushings are OK or not

You can buy OEM parts for OEM ride when done, or you can buy Rock Auto parts and get most of the benefit at 1/2 the cost.

Frankly, except for those two arms that were ruined by someone, the rest of the arms are probably good as new (steel) and only need the bushings replaced, which are not available separately from Toyota, but maybe aftermarket ones will be close enough to be worth the effort, for less money than replacing the whole arm.
And to validate your diagnosis, I hadn’t seen your message until comming back online to post these photos... and it seems you’re correct.
305448
305449
305450
305451
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, do the whole thing.I just did the whole front and some of the rear suspension on my 2003 Solara. I experienced the same crappy ride when driving around. Initially I was only going to replace the sway bar links but as soon as I got under there I saw that pretty much everything needed to be replaced. I couldn't just replace the sway bar links but have sloppy, worn out lower ball joints and cracked/dry bushings. I know that money is an issue and it's certainly the case for me as well. I ended up getting a cheapo front end kit for around $100 (lower control arms, ball joints, inner tie rods, etc). Yes they are cheapo parts and longevity is questionable but you'll definitely appreciate the better handling.
And my front end seems pretty good. Between front axels, tie rods, new wheels, and some bushings, it’s doing okay. But this rear end is f’n shot it looks like. Hope it lasts long enough to hit a junkyard or find a deal somewhere. Thanks for your insight, and it appears you were absolutely correct.

give the man a badge!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
those bent means our rear wheels have probably an unsafe amount of toe out, which would make the car very twitchy handling, most likely a stupid tow truck tie down did that damage

definitely replace those two, and if the bushings look badly worn then the two in front of them as well (note these two are easy to replace, the forward ones need the subframe dropped to get the long bolts out), and while you have the rear apart for that work you can decide if the trailing arms bushings are OK or not

You can buy OEM parts for OEM ride when done, or you can buy Rock Auto parts and get most of the benefit at 1/2 the cost.

Frankly, except for those two arms that were ruined by someone, the rest of the arms are probably good as new (steel) and only need the bushings replaced, which are not available separately from Toyota, but maybe aftermarket ones will be close enough to be worth the effort, for less money than replacing the whole arm.
I posted a few more photos, but you and our Other friend Here seem to have nailed it in one. Thanks for yo ur time and so aight. It’s greatly appreciated.
 

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Holy geezus! There's your problem. Order up a couple of tires while you are there. Wow! I guess the good news it looks like the tires were approaching end of life any way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Holy geezus! There's your problem. Order up a couple of tires while you are there. Wow! I guess the good news it looks like the tires were approaching end of life any way.
Dude... those were brand new 4 months ago. Run flats. 😳
 

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Just straighten the bent rods. Hell I've straightened out a gun barrel, those would be cake. Someone definitely hooked those.
 

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Camreee
'99 Auto V6 Camry
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I don't know that I'd trust one after being fatigued like that..they snap and crack pretty easily, especially near the threaded portion.
 

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I don't know that I'd trust one after being fatigued like that..they snap and crack pretty easily, especially near the threaded portion.
we’re gonna see how it goes. I’ve got a procedure that’s supposed to retemper the parts, using an oven. But we’ll see how it goes.

Other option, was basically reverse the direction of the forces that caused it (hooks from flatbead chains). Was gonna burry some rebar with an eyebolt welded to the top, at ground level. Run chains from the eyes to the spots on the linkages. Then back up a little and see if it pulls them back into place some. It’s trial and error. Can’t drive it anymore safely, so screw it. YouTube, here I come!
 

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Just straighten the bent rods. Hell I've straightened out a gun barrel, those would be cake. Someone definitely hooked those.
You are comparing a hollow tube that is designed with heat in mind to a soft metal bar that isn't designed to get heated up. Do not heat and bend rods like these, they stretch and get brittle making them snap a lot easier.
 

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we’re gonna see how it goes. I’ve got a procedure that’s supposed to retemper the parts, using an oven. But we’ll see how it goes.

Other option, was basically reverse the direction of the forces that caused it (hooks from flatbead chains). Was gonna burry some rebar with an eyebolt welded to the top, at ground level. Run chains from the eyes to the spots on the linkages. Then back up a little and see if it pulls them back into place some. It’s trial and error. Can’t drive it anymore safely, so screw it. YouTube, here I come!
You can find literally hundreds of these is a 50 mile radius by looking in junk yards. It will cost you about $30 or so and you don't risk your rear end snapping while you drive. Your suspension moves a lot and absorbs a lot of bumps and hits. These were never tempered in the first place otherwise they would crack under the type of usage they get. Bending them will create a weak spot from fatigue and then heating them up will only make that weak spot brittle.
 

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You are comparing a hollow tube that is designed with heat in mind to a soft metal bar that isn't designed to get heated up. Do not heat and bend rods like these, they stretch and get brittle making them snap a lot easier.
It would have saved the tire as well as the wear and tear on all the related components. Since you decided to ASS-UME a repair that allowed alignment to be maintained to become a permanent repair, I'll ASS-UME you think tearing a tire to pieces is good logic, MAYBE NOT. Call it an emergency repair, until the parts to replace can be acquired, but it you go to a junkyard then you risk SOMEONE ELSE DOING THE SAME THING TO WHAT YOU JUST BOUGHT, so YOUR solution is just as flawed. You just need the threaded portion of the rod and the loads on that part are all longitudinal, compression and extension.
Try a better suggestion if you decide to criticize another's suggestion. I SHOT the gun barrel I straightened.
Ever straighten a frame to where the alignment was perfect after that damage pushed the front wheel back into the splash shield? Did that on a 72 Plymouth Satellite.
Maybe not.
 

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It would have saved the tire as well as the wear and tear on all the related components. Since you decided to ASS-UME a repair that allowed alignment to be maintained to become a permanent repair, I'll ASS-UME you think tearing a tire to pieces is good logic, MAYBE NOT. Call it an emergency repair, until the parts to replace can be acquired, but it you go to a junkyard then you risk SOMEONE ELSE DOING THE SAME THING TO WHAT YOU JUST BOUGHT, so YOUR solution is just as flawed. You just need the threaded portion of the rod and the loads on that part are all longitudinal, compression and extension.
Try a better suggestion if you decide to criticize another's suggestion. I SHOT the gun barrel I straightened.
Ever straighten a frame to where the alignment was perfect after that damage pushed the front wheel back into the splash shield? Did that on a 72 Plymouth Satellite.
Maybe not.
Alright cool guy. You clearly don't understand the type of metal being used. Once again, you are comparing a HOLLOW TUBE designed for CONSTANT HEAT AND COOLING to a solid soft metal THAT NEVER GETS HOT. Do you have any idea what that actually does? You clearly do not. Your second comparison of a frame which does not move much to a component that is constantly moving (Hence the rubber bushing) is quite idiotic as well.

It is safer to travel with how it is bent now than it would be to bend it back. As for grabbing a junk yard component, you don't realize you select which one you want do you? Don't accept bent parts knuckle head.

Please don't fire that barrel you straitened unless you checked your rifle bore and reapplied both the inner and outer coatings.

Yes, I have straitened the frame on older cars. On both a 57 Chevy Bel Air and a 68 Nova. I have also rebuilt the frame the 68 Nova though that was due to us turning it into a drag car that was mostly made of carbon fiber. Don't assume that just because your username is Old Mechanic that others haven't been doing this for a while.

To simplify for you, here is a short 6 and a half minute video explaining why your idea is terrible.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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I would not try to straighten a threaded rod (note the bend is in the threaded portion, in the photo) because the threads create stress risers which might have led to cracking/fatigue, which is not good for a suspension part.
 

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Camreee
'99 Auto V6 Camry
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Hey man, I've done some stupid stuff but this takes the cake. If one of these breaks while highway driving you WILL crash.

You can full an entire rear suspension from a junkyard in an hour and not endanger everyone who rides in your car or around it.

There is no way you can safely unbend that and then use it for anything but a golf club.
 

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Hey y’all. My 1996 Camry LE 2.2L, is slipping and sliding all over the place.
The easy simple way is to find a first-rate independent shop in your area that specializes in four-wheel alignments. These shops can not and will not align your car if it has a faulty part or problem that will keep it from being aligned or holding alignment. They will put your car on their lift and will give you a list of problems to fix and parts to replace that it needs before it can even be aligned. Then just replace or fix whatever they tell you to and take it back to them and have them do the alignment. Done.......
 

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In college a friend of mine broke a rear tie rod when he hit a curb in a snow storm. We straightened it out with a torch, set the toe with a tape measure, clamped some rebar over the break and welded it together. It was supposed to be a temporary fix to get him home to fix it right, but he drove it like that for 3 more years until he junked it. I wouldn't do this today, but it made sense at the time.

My point is a temporary repair of these is possible, just be careful your temporary repair doesn't become permanent. And yes, if it breaks while you are driving - good luck!
 
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