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I was hoping to keep my 98 corolla a little bit longer however when I took it in for state inspection, I was told it needs new break line plus whole Steering Rack & Pinion replaced. I was quoted almost 2000 dollars.

Is there anyway I could do it my self? I have lots of time.

if yes, whats the easiest way to do it.

My corolla has about 120000 miles and it does not burn oil.
 

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I was hoping to keep my 98 corolla a little bit longer however when I took it in for state inspection, I was told it needs new break line plus whole Steering Rack & Pinion replaced. I was quoted almost 2000 dollars.

Is there anyway I could do it my self? I have lots of time.

if yes, whats the easiest way to do it.

My corolla has about 120000 miles and it does not burn oil.
You could do it yourself. I wouldn't say there is an "easy" way of replacing it. Depends on the tools you have available and the space to work. Just watch some youtube videos about preforming the task. Then, decide if you're comfortable with doing the job.
 

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Mod. Break. Fix. Repeat.
2001 Corolla CE
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I had to replace the rack and pinion on my 01 when I got it. Original one with 298k miles on it was so worn out it had nearly an inch of slop from side to side and would allow the car to veer left and right; would actually make the car pull to one side when braking and to the other side when on the accelerator... Was EXTREMELY unsafe to drive.

I grabbed a junk yard unit with 50k miles on it from an 02, swapped my outer tie rod ends over since they looked fairly new, and it's worked like a charm.

Even with the right tools, changing the rack and pinion yourself is going to have you making up cuss words because you're going to quickly run out of the ones you already know...

The hardest part is the fact that one of the main mounting bolts that hold the rack assembly to the car is inaccessible unless you loosen a lot or completely drop the lower suspension crossmember... (I removed all the bolts from the driver's side and loosened almost completely all of the passenger side bolts) Then once you get that bolt out, you have to at least remove the passenger side outer tie rod and steer the rack to the far right in order to make it able to be pulled from the car. Then you have to pull it out the driver's side via the hole that the tie rod end passes through, and as you're doing so lift the passenger side end up to get the correct angle at the area that the input shaft is at to pass through the hold on the driver's side. Putting it back in is just as much as a pain in the arse...

So diy, definitely. Difficulty, maybe a 6 out of 10, but overall aggravation, 9 out of 10... Only real special tool you might need is a tie rod end remover, but you can get by without one. Aside from that, just have a full set of metric sockets and wrenches from 8mm to 22mm, 1/4 drive, 3/8 drive, 1/2 drive, whatever you can round up.



As far as the brake line, that really depends on what line. If it's a steel hard line, it's sometimes a little more involved and more difficult to both get a new one and replace it. If it's a rubber flex line at a wheel, that's an easy 20 minute job. They're just held on with a couple clips and clamps to keep them from flopping around, and are bolted or threaded together at either end.
 

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I've attempted to change the Rack on my 02 Rav4 and in the end opted out have the shop do it fo me for $800 with 2 years warranty. When you lay on your back under the car trying to leverage all the cross member bolts torqued to 150 Ibs I gave up. I just knew that I will break a bolt or two and then I'll have to tow my car to the shop anyway. I did the complete timing belt and water pump job on my 99 camry, brakes and all the other basic suspension jobs but the Rack was little too much for me. I think doing this with another person and having another car available in case you have to go to the Parts store would be the way to go. On my 02 Rav4 with 214K everything was also very rusty (Chicago) so the chances of breaking bolts or fitting is very high especially when unbolting original Rack. Good luck anyway.
 

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I was hoping to keep my 98 corolla a little bit longer however when I took it in for state inspection, I was told it needs new break line plus whole Steering Rack & Pinion replaced. I was quoted almost 2000 dollars.

Is there anyway I could do it my self? I have lots of time.

if yes, whats the easiest way to do it.

My corolla has about 120000 miles and it does not burn oil.
Get a second opinion for sure!!!
 

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$2,000. That's funny. The part cost <$200:eek:
 

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I had to replace the rack and pinion on my 01 when I got it. Original one with 298k miles on it was so worn out it had nearly an inch of slop from side to side and would allow the car to veer left and right; would actually make the car pull to one side when braking and to the other side when on the accelerator... Was EXTREMELY unsafe to drive.

I grabbed a junk yard unit with 50k miles on it from an 02, swapped my outer tie rod ends over since they looked fairly new, and it's worked like a charm.

Even with the right tools, changing the rack and pinion yourself is going to have you making up cuss words because you're going to quickly run out of the ones you already know...

The hardest part is the fact that one of the main mounting bolts that hold the rack assembly to the car is inaccessible unless you loosen a lot or completely drop the lower suspension crossmember... (I removed all the bolts from the driver's side and loosened almost completely all of the passenger side bolts) Then once you get that bolt out, you have to at least remove the passenger side outer tie rod and steer the rack to the far right in order to make it able to be pulled from the car. Then you have to pull it out the driver's side via the hole that the tie rod end passes through, and as you're doing so lift the passenger side end up to get the correct angle at the area that the input shaft is at to pass through the hold on the driver's side. Putting it back in is just as much as a pain in the arse...

So diy, definitely. Difficulty, maybe a 6 out of 10, but overall aggravation, 9 out of 10... Only real special tool you might need is a tie rod end remover, but you can get by without one. Aside from that, just have a full set of metric sockets and wrenches from 8mm to 22mm, 1/4 drive, 3/8 drive, 1/2 drive, whatever you can round up.



As far as the brake line, that really depends on what line. If it's a steel hard line, it's sometimes a little more involved and more difficult to both get a new one and replace it. If it's a rubber flex line at a wheel, that's an easy 20 minute job. They're just held on with a couple clips and clamps to keep them from flopping around, and are bolted or threaded together at either end.
Good stuff right here. Thanks for taking the time to write it up :)
 
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