Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
'98 Corolla LE
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2004 4Runner with the V6 (1GR-FE) engine. Steering has felt very stiff for a few weeks now, am wondering if anyone has had this happen and if a fluid flush will help as I think there are regulating "valves" in the pump housing that may get dirty/clogged? Any way to tell if it may be the rack instead? No noises really, just extra effort required.

Should also mention I have a ripped CV boot on the drivers side and am planning to replace that half shaft regardless as it may be starting to click, but I don't think that could be causing the stiffness?

If the flush is worth trying, anyone know the correct ATF to use? Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Lndcrs, 4run, camry,
Joined
·
2,448 Posts
EdW,

Have you checked the belt tension for the power steering pump too see if it is adjusted right? Have you checked the fluid level/ leaks? That would be the first place I would go. Maybe you have a pump failing. Or maybe the rack is bypassing fluid causing it to be more difficult to turn.
 

·
Registered
'98 Corolla LE
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sorry, should have mentioned that I did check all that first and there's no sign of issues there, fluid level seems fine, no burning smell, all is dry and belt seems fine. Thanks for the reply, keep them coming, I'm open to suggestions.
 

·
Registered
'98 Corolla LE
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Turns out that the steering column was the culprit and in need of some grease. Back to it's old self now. Thanks for the replies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Turns out that the steering column was the culprit and in need of some grease. Back to it's old self now. Thanks for the replies.
Just wondering what part of your steering column needed lubrication? Did you take it to a shop or find something in there yourself? thanks in advance...
 

·
Registered
'98 Corolla LE
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It was the lower "U-joint" that's just above the rack on what's called the Steering Intermediate Shaft Sub-Assembly No. 2. I mention that specifically because the lube didn't last a year and I ended up having to replace the part completely with new from the dealer. Wasn't too difficult for anyone needing to do it, but keep your steering wheel exactly straight before disassy and make sure it doesn't move or rotate, and on reassy make sure it's in the same exact position before sliding the steering yoke down on the splines. I tried marking the position of the old shaft before taking it out, but that didn't work well for me.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top