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Registered
1999 Camry LE
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106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering what the amperage was for a stock alternator at idle for a 1999 Camry 4 cyl (5sfe) I have searched for this but I came up empty. Thanks folks.
 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
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368 Posts
The reason you can't find it is because there is no spec for that value.

The reason there is no spec is that the system requirements, connections, and battery type and condition all figure into whatever this value would become.
 

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TN Pussy Man
Camry
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13,302 Posts
use voltmeter or ammeter and find out
 

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The Greek....
96 Camry
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1,471 Posts
You should be around 14 volts when the car is idling and everything is working properly.
 

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Registered
2002 Camry
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2,231 Posts
yeah what the other fellows said, volts is whats usually tested here, CCA on the battery means of course, cold cranking amps and it is a spec that the manufacturer of the car says is the minimum the battery needs to be able to output when you buy it. But if you are testing it the rule of thumb is for volts.

Desired voltage, engine idling (give it two minutes to recharge from the start): 13.9 - 15.0 volts
Battery, engine off: desired, 12.8 - 13.0
marginal: 12.4 - 12.7

 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
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368 Posts
...and the amperage (current) from the alternator will vary at that voltage according to the system needs. That's why there is no idle amperage specification.
 

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Registered
1999 Camry LE
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106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That all makes sense, most of that I knew. I have a voltmeter gauge on my A-pillar and the voltage is fine. The reason I'm asking is I'm looking at upgrading my alternator. The one I'm looking at says at idle it puts out 115amps (200 amps overall). I know our stock alternator is ~80amps but I doubt its 80 amps at idle. Any comments? Thanks for all the responses though. Much appreciated.
 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
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368 Posts
What they are saying is that their alternator is CAPABLE of producing that current at idle, should the system indicate to the regulator that such current is needed. A car with a very large sound system and electric hydraulics might need that kind of power for parking lot tricks. Other vehicles like ambulances also use high output alternators to power all of the lights and equipment while working on-scene.

If you don't need a high output at idle, there's no reason to buy one.
 
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