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G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???

I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
stalling is concerned?

So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.

With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
I consider? Appreciate your advice here.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
<Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
> drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
> it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
> but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>
> I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
> tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
> stalling is concerned?
>


That's false. The tail pipe can be submerged and it'll only gurgle like a
boat. The trouble comes when the intake is submerged. Well, if the tail pipe
is submerged AND the motor stops running, that could spell trouble, but by
then the intake is probably under water anyway, and you already have
trouble.

If your Tacoma is the PreRunner variety, and not 4WD, then it'll have an
automatic anyhow. When I was looking for Tacos, I found to my dismay that
they can't be had with a manual trans unless you get the 4WD, or .not. the
PreRunner.




> So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
> prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
> and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
> but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>
> With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
> on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
> I consider? Appreciate your advice here.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
> drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
> it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
> but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>
> I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
> tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
> stalling is concerned?
>
> So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
> prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
> and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
> but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>
> With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
> on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
> I consider? Appreciate your advice here.


How many times a year does it rain like that?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 03:23:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
><Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>> I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>> drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>> it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>> but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>>
>> I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
>> tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
>> stalling is concerned?
>>
>> So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
>> prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
>> and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
>> but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>>
>> With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
>> on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
>> I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>
>How many times a year does it rain like that?
>


Hard to say because Houston is a large area which gets localized
flooding so it depends where you drive. Since I'm able to afford a
new truck, economics isn't my main concern but rather safety or peace
of mind if I have to drive thru street flooding which is more often
than I want to.

The sad part is I will have to trade in or sell my '92 Corolla which
is a fine car because I don't need one more vehicle. I own several
almost new cars now but for some reason I love older cars. Oh well,
my problem.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 03:23:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>><Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]ax.com...
>>> I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>>> drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>>> it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>>> but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>>>
>>> I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
>>> tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
>>> stalling is concerned?
>>>
>>> So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
>>> prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
>>> and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
>>> but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>>>
>>> With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
>>> on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
>>> I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>>
>>How many times a year does it rain like that?
>>

>
> Hard to say because Houston is a large area which gets localized
> flooding so it depends where you drive. Since I'm able to afford a
> new truck, economics isn't my main concern but rather safety or peace
> of mind if I have to drive thru street flooding which is more often
> than I want to.
>
> The sad part is I will have to trade in or sell my '92 Corolla which
> is a fine car because I don't need one more vehicle. I own several
> almost new cars now but for some reason I love older cars. Oh well,
> my problem.


I asked because I was wondering if you're ready to use at least 25-35% more
fuel, which might be annoying if you only need the ground clearance for 3
hours per year.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:03:51 -0600, Rob wrote:

>I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???


Rule Number One: If you don't know how deep the water is, or what's
under it, Do Not Drive There. Get your waders on and go check first.

It's far too easy to do some severe damage - run over a submerged
fire hydrant, or a power transformer, or a "Do Not Back Up" spike
strip that will wreck all four tires, or find out there's a 30-foot
deep sinkhole where the road used to be...

Park the truck on high ground, and use a boat. Seriously. If you
expect that severe a batch of weather, go buy yourself a boat and a
trailer, and tow it around. Next flood I can Guarantee you'll be the
most popular person for miles around.

>I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
>tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
>stalling is concerned?


False. Think about the average ski boat or fishing boat - they have
the exhaust line underwater on the transom or on the side of the
outdrive or through the propeller hub of the outboard motor, and it
works perfectly. Sits there happily blowing bubbles at idle. The
only difference being boats have a check valve to keep water out with
the engine stopped, cars don't - but if the water is that deep over
the tailpipe, you have far bigger problems to deal with.

Your primary hazards are ingesting water into the engine air intake,
or drowning out the high-tension ignition wires or the 12-volt engine
electricals with splashed water. An engine will not run without
spark, fuel, and air. Drown the ignition system or the EFI system,
and you stop. Drown the alternator, and you stop as soon as the
battery goes flat. Drown the starter motor, and once it stalls you
can not restart. Drown the air intake, and you can hydrolock one or
more cylinders and permanently damage or destroy the engine.

>So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
>prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
>and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
>but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>
>With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
>on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
>I consider? Appreciate your advice here.


If you want to play around in a lake, go buy yourself a 1942-era
DUKW "Duck" amphibious truck, restore it, and use that. ;-) Or go
drop $120K on a full-boat optioned Hummer H-1 with the fording kit.

But if you want it to be able to Slowly And Cautiously wade through
some fairly severe flooding, go buy a Tacoma or Tundra, preferably
4WD. Too many hidden obstacles to get stuck on with a 2WD.

Get a mild lift kit (4 to 6 inches total) and slightly larger tires.
Do not go overboard with the lift or tires, because that just makes it
easier to roll over the first time you get in a severe off-camber.

If you need steps to get in, you do not want "nerf bars" as they are
purely cosmetic - they can bend just by being used as steps. If you
want full length running boards, ask for "Rock Sliders" that are built
and mounted strong enough to prevent body damage. Much more added
resale value - and far cheaper than getting a door replaced and the
door sill repaired after you 'kiss a rock' driving off-road.

And Rock Sliders work in parking lots, too. Great for fending off
the worst of the damage in sneak attacks by hidden crash posts. ;-P

Hook up remote vent hoses to the transmission, transfer case, and
both axle differentials, so water can't come in through the breathers
- they make a common vent rail that mounts high up on the firewall
where it won't flood that you can hook the vent hoses to.

The ignition systems and stock air box and intake systems are fairly
well waterproofed from the factory, as long as you leave the splash
shields in the fender wells in place. The biggest problem in drowning
the engine is the radiator fan going underwater and flinging water
back onto the engine, and after that it's hitting the water moving
fast enough for it to send waves into the engine compartment. That's
why I said "Slow And Easy".

If you do manage to drown the engine electricals, WD-40 is the magic
elixir that can usually get you running again. "Don't Leave Home
Without It." (When properly applied, of course. Have a mechanic show
you how to dry out the distributor cap and other critical areas.)

--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 04:55:02 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
><Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>> On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 03:23:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
>> <[email protected]otmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>><Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>>>> I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>>>> drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>>>> it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>>>> but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>>>>
>>>> I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
>>>> tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
>>>> stalling is concerned?
>>>>
>>>> So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
>>>> prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
>>>> and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
>>>> but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>>>>
>>>> With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
>>>> on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
>>>> I consider? Appreciate your advice here.
>>>
>>>How many times a year does it rain like that?
>>>

>>
>> Hard to say because Houston is a large area which gets localized
>> flooding so it depends where you drive. Since I'm able to afford a
>> new truck, economics isn't my main concern but rather safety or peace
>> of mind if I have to drive thru street flooding which is more often
>> than I want to.
>>
>> The sad part is I will have to trade in or sell my '92 Corolla which
>> is a fine car because I don't need one more vehicle. I own several
>> almost new cars now but for some reason I love older cars. Oh well,
>> my problem.

>
>I asked because I was wondering if you're ready to use at least 25-35% more
>fuel, which might be annoying if you only need the ground clearance for 3
>hours per year.
>


You're right of course and compared to my old Corolla, almost anything
will use more gas and cost MORE to maintain. Because of the initial
expense to purchase this truck, I knew it wasn't an economical choice
to start.

So yes, I am prepared for that but thanks for pointing it out.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
"Bruce L. Bergman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:03:51 -0600, Rob wrote:
>
>>I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>>drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>>it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>>but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???

>
> Rule Number One: If you don't know how deep the water is, or what's
> under it, Do Not Drive There. Get your waders on and go check first.

snip
> If you do manage to drown the engine electricals, WD-40 is the magic
> elixir that can usually get you running again. "Don't Leave Home
> Without It." (When properly applied, of course. Have a mechanic show
> you how to dry out the distributor cap and other critical areas.)
>
> --<< Bruce >>--
> --


What's a "distributor cap" Bruce?

Ever hear of DIS? LOL

--

- Philip
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 15:05:33 GMT, "Philip"
<[email protected]> wrote:
>"Bruce L. Bergman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]


>snip
>> If you do manage to drown the engine electricals, WD-40 is the magic
>> elixir that can usually get you running again. "Don't Leave Home
>> Without It." (When properly applied, of course. Have a mechanic show
>> you how to dry out the distributor cap and other critical areas.)

>
>What's a "distributor cap" Bruce?
>
>Ever hear of DIS? LOL


A distributor cap is something you find on a slightly older truck,
and I guarantee they aren't totally going away any time soon. One
simple reason: They work. They've been totally debugged. Heck, light
aircraft are still sticking with magnetos.

They could even get all the cars and trucks sold in the USA totally
changed over to Distributorless Ignition Systems. But third world
countries where you have to do field repairs but your "shop lift"
consists of a rock and a big log (and there are none of those pesky
smog laws) will still get KISS vehicles equipped with carburetors and
distributors for the next 20 years.

And with a DIS there are many more electronics and sensors involved,
any one of which can have water failure issues and stop dead on you.
And it's possible to get water into the DIS coil packs, or shorting
the spark plugs or the high-tension plug wires - there's no such thing
as a perfect seal.

--<< Bruce >>--

--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
tailpipe can be submerged. IF you shut off the motor it will suck some
water back but I doubt it will get in the motor ... may get in the cat
though .. also not very lilely ..

What you do want to be concerned about is:

- Water getting in your axles ... to prevent that you can put Diff
breathers on .. which u can do youself and costs a few $ .. let me know
if u need more info.

- Heat shocking components like axles , trans, exhaust which isnt very
good but no big deal unless done all the time .. the idea is that you
dont want to have a HOT part touch cold water as it will cool down and
warp and eventually break.

- Wheelbearings and driveshaft joints may get wet and need fresh lube
every so often. Up to daily if you use your truck as boat ...

- getting water in the intake is bad but 8" is no issue here

Matt
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"Bruce L. Bergman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 15:05:33 GMT, "Philip"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>"Bruce L. Bergman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]

>
>>snip
>>> If you do manage to drown the engine electricals, WD-40 is the magic
>>> elixir that can usually get you running again. "Don't Leave Home
>>> Without It." (When properly applied, of course. Have a mechanic show
>>> you how to dry out the distributor cap and other critical areas.)

>>
>>What's a "distributor cap" Bruce?
>>
>>Ever hear of DIS? LOL

>
> A distributor cap is something you find on a slightly older truck,
> and I guarantee they aren't totally going away any time soon. One
> simple reason: They work. They've been totally debugged. Heck, light
> aircraft are still sticking with magnetos.


Aircraft don't have to meet the stringent EPA emissions nor be tinker
resistant.

> They could even get all the cars and trucks sold in the USA totally
> changed over to Distributorless Ignition Systems. But third world
> countries where you have to do field repairs but your "shop lift"
> consists of a rock and a big log (and there are none of those pesky
> smog laws) will still get KISS vehicles equipped with carburetors and
> distributors for the next 20 years.


You're dreaming.

> And with a DIS there are many more electronics and sensors involved,
> any one of which can have water failure issues and stop dead on you.
> And it's possible to get water into the DIS coil packs, or shorting
> the spark plugs or the high-tension plug wires - there's no such thing
> as a perfect seal.
>
> --<< Bruce >>--


There is no distributor as water resistant as DIS. That rotor chamber has
to be vented or else.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> tailpipe can be submerged. IF you shut off the motor it will suck some
> water back but I doubt it will get in the motor ... may get in the cat
> though .. also not very lilely ..
>
> What you do want to be concerned about is:
>
> - Water getting in your axles ... to prevent that you can put Diff
> breathers on .. which u can do youself and costs a few $ .. let me know
> if u need more info.
>
> - Heat shocking components like axles , trans, exhaust which isnt very
> good but no big deal unless done all the time .. the idea is that you
> dont want to have a HOT part touch cold water as it will cool down and
> warp and eventually break.
>
> - Wheelbearings and driveshaft joints may get wet and need fresh lube
> every so often. Up to daily if you use your truck as boat ...
>
> - getting water in the intake is bad but 8" is no issue here
>
> Matt
>


I have an 03 stock. TRD 16in wheels and 31 tires. I've driven through water
deeper than 8 inches, probably up to my doors.
Check this pic...its a small pic, but I never stalled it there lol
http://img492.imageshack.us/img492/1040/splash4x43kw.jpg

I have a friend in Houston and he has sent me pics of local flooding he has
encountered...not good at all. I said if I ever lived there I'd have a 4x4.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
"Jeff Strickland" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> <Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> > I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
> > drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
> > it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
> > but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
> >
> > I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
> > tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
> > stalling is concerned?
> >

>
> That's false. The tail pipe can be submerged and it'll only gurgle like a
> boat. The trouble comes when the intake is submerged. Well, if the tail

pipe
> is submerged AND the motor stops running, that could spell trouble, but by
> then the intake is probably under water anyway, and you already have
> trouble.
>
> If your Tacoma is the PreRunner variety, and not 4WD, then it'll have an
> automatic anyhow. When I was looking for Tacos, I found to my dismay that
> they can't be had with a manual trans unless you get the 4WD, or .not. the
> PreRunner.


'06 prerunners are available with either manual or automatic transmission.


> > So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
> > prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
> > and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
> > but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
> >
> > With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
> > on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
> > I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 12:50:04 GMT, "Brad P" <[email protected]> found
these unused words floating about:

>
>
>
>"L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> tailpipe can be submerged. IF you shut off the motor it will suck some
>> water back but I doubt it will get in the motor ... may get in the cat
>> though .. also not very lilely ..
>>
>> What you do want to be concerned about is:
>>
>> - Water getting in your axles ... to prevent that you can put Diff
>> breathers on .. which u can do youself and costs a few $ .. let me know
>> if u need more info.
>>
>> - Heat shocking components like axles , trans, exhaust which isnt very
>> good but no big deal unless done all the time .. the idea is that you
>> dont want to have a HOT part touch cold water as it will cool down and
>> warp and eventually break.
>>
>> - Wheelbearings and driveshaft joints may get wet and need fresh lube
>> every so often. Up to daily if you use your truck as boat ...
>>
>> - getting water in the intake is bad but 8" is no issue here
>>
>> Matt
>>

>
>I have an 03 stock. TRD 16in wheels and 31 tires. I've driven through water
>deeper than 8 inches, probably up to my doors.
>Check this pic...its a small pic, but I never stalled it there lol
>http://img492.imageshack.us/img492/1040/splash4x43kw.jpg
>
>I have a friend in Houston and he has sent me pics of local flooding he has
>encountered...not good at all. I said if I ever lived there I'd have a 4x4.
>

Hope your rear end wasn't hot --- check your differential!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
"M.Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Jeff Strickland" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> <Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>> > I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
>> > drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
>> > it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
>> > but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
>> >
>> > I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
>> > tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
>> > stalling is concerned?
>> >

>>
>> That's false. The tail pipe can be submerged and it'll only gurgle like a
>> boat. The trouble comes when the intake is submerged. Well, if the tail

> pipe
>> is submerged AND the motor stops running, that could spell trouble, but
>> by
>> then the intake is probably under water anyway, and you already have
>> trouble.
>>
>> If your Tacoma is the PreRunner variety, and not 4WD, then it'll have an
>> automatic anyhow. When I was looking for Tacos, I found to my dismay that
>> they can't be had with a manual trans unless you get the 4WD, or .not.
>> the
>> PreRunner.

>
> '06 prerunners are available with either manual or automatic transmission.
>
>


Cool. That's an option they sorely needed to bring back to the truck line
....




>> > So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
>> > prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
>> > and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
>> > but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
>> >
>> > With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
>> > on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
>> > I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>>

>
>
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
"Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> <Rob> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> > I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
> > drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
> > it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
> > but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???
> >
> > I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
> > tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
> > stalling is concerned?
> >
> > So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
> > prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
> > and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
> > but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
> >
> > With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
> > on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
> > I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>
> How many times a year does it rain like that?
>

It rained like that a few days ago. I guaged 5.5 inches in a couple of
hours. The city uses the streets for drainage overflow here and you can see
the water rise when it is raining real hard. You can find yourself bubbling
through a foot of water in a hurry. We used to water ski behind motorcycles
when I was a kid here in west houston.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
While all this advice below is good, it is mostly impossible in Houston or
unnecessary. I own a stock '84 4x4 xtracab 22R and I drive it through deep
water here on a regular basis. You just can't get out and test the depth.
First off you are usually in heavy traffic and everybody is pushing to move
because the water ir rising in the street. The streets here are engineered
to take the overflow instead of property. The water is usually between 4 to
15 inches deep. In a heavy rain you can suddenly find yourself floating or
sinking. I almost got caught in my Honda Civic the other day when we got
5.5 inches in a couple of hours. I usually don't worry about rising water,
but I found that having the Toy 4x4 is good insuarnce for this city. I
don't have the lift kits and big tires. But I do keep forward movement and
constantly look for a way out or another street to go down. Stopping in
deep water can mean stopping forever. The other thing one must be
responsible towards is flooding out another car with my wave. And I am
always ready to pull someone out.

"Bruce L. Bergman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:03:51 -0600, Rob wrote:
>
> >I'm considering buying a 2006 Tacoma reg or access cab to help us
> >drive thru the normal road flooding that occurs in Houston, Texas when
> >it rains without stalling. I don't know the height of the flooding
> >but I'm guessing 8 inches or so???

>
> Rule Number One: If you don't know how deep the water is, or what's
> under it, Do Not Drive There. Get your waders on and go check first.
>
> It's far too easy to do some severe damage - run over a submerged
> fire hydrant, or a power transformer, or a "Do Not Back Up" spike
> strip that will wreck all four tires, or find out there's a 30-foot
> deep sinkhole where the road used to be...
>
> Park the truck on high ground, and use a boat. Seriously. If you
> expect that severe a batch of weather, go buy yourself a boat and a
> trailer, and tow it around. Next flood I can Guarantee you'll be the
> most popular person for miles around.
>
> >I was once told and please tell me if you agree or disagree, that the
> >tailpipe is the main concern when driving thru the water as far as
> >stalling is concerned?

>
> False. Think about the average ski boat or fishing boat - they have
> the exhaust line underwater on the transom or on the side of the
> outdrive or through the propeller hub of the outboard motor, and it
> works perfectly. Sits there happily blowing bubbles at idle. The
> only difference being boats have a check valve to keep water out with
> the engine stopped, cars don't - but if the water is that deep over
> the tailpipe, you have far bigger problems to deal with.
>
> Your primary hazards are ingesting water into the engine air intake,
> or drowning out the high-tension ignition wires or the 12-volt engine
> electricals with splashed water. An engine will not run without
> spark, fuel, and air. Drown the ignition system or the EFI system,
> and you stop. Drown the alternator, and you stop as soon as the
> battery goes flat. Drown the starter motor, and once it stalls you
> can not restart. Drown the air intake, and you can hydrolock one or
> more cylinders and permanently damage or destroy the engine.
>
> >So I'm thinking of a 2006 Tacoma but it's gotta be automatic and
> >prefer 4 cylinder tho if I had to have a 6 okay. Also since my wife
> >and I are approaching our senior years, I don't want any monster truck
> >but I don't mind using running boards to assist us getting inside.
> >
> >With all this in mind, do you think a Tacoma here will work and based
> >on my criteria, which model or specs do I need? What size rims should
> >I consider? Appreciate your advice here.

>
> If you want to play around in a lake, go buy yourself a 1942-era
> DUKW "Duck" amphibious truck, restore it, and use that. ;-) Or go
> drop $120K on a full-boat optioned Hummer H-1 with the fording kit.
>
> But if you want it to be able to Slowly And Cautiously wade through
> some fairly severe flooding, go buy a Tacoma or Tundra, preferably
> 4WD. Too many hidden obstacles to get stuck on with a 2WD.
>
> Get a mild lift kit (4 to 6 inches total) and slightly larger tires.
> Do not go overboard with the lift or tires, because that just makes it
> easier to roll over the first time you get in a severe off-camber.
>
> If you need steps to get in, you do not want "nerf bars" as they are
> purely cosmetic - they can bend just by being used as steps. If you
> want full length running boards, ask for "Rock Sliders" that are built
> and mounted strong enough to prevent body damage. Much more added
> resale value - and far cheaper than getting a door replaced and the
> door sill repaired after you 'kiss a rock' driving off-road.
>
> And Rock Sliders work in parking lots, too. Great for fending off
> the worst of the damage in sneak attacks by hidden crash posts. ;-P
>
> Hook up remote vent hoses to the transmission, transfer case, and
> both axle differentials, so water can't come in through the breathers
> - they make a common vent rail that mounts high up on the firewall
> where it won't flood that you can hook the vent hoses to.
>
> The ignition systems and stock air box and intake systems are fairly
> well waterproofed from the factory, as long as you leave the splash
> shields in the fender wells in place. The biggest problem in drowning
> the engine is the radiator fan going underwater and flinging water
> back onto the engine, and after that it's hitting the water moving
> fast enough for it to send waves into the engine compartment. That's
> why I said "Slow And Easy".
>
> If you do manage to drown the engine electricals, WD-40 is the magic
> elixir that can usually get you running again. "Don't Leave Home
> Without It." (When properly applied, of course. Have a mechanic show
> you how to dry out the distributor cap and other critical areas.)
>
> --<< Bruce >>--
> --
> Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
> Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
> 5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
> Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
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