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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



so here is the page from my manual on how to test the distributor . I got good readings from the primary coil on both my distributors.
But on the secondary coil I have the multimeter at 20k ohms and I touch where the pictures say and I got a reading of 11.55 - 12.55

so does that mean my distributor is bad since that is out of spec? or did I do something wrong it seems pretty self explanatory. just wanted some input before I order a distributor
 

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But on the secondary coil I have the multimeter at 20k ohms and I touch where the pictures say and I got a reading of 11.55 - 12.55
If ignition-coil is bad... Why would you buy $800 distributor to replace $100 part???

That reading of 11.5-12.55 K-ohms is correct for 2ndary coil. You already got spark out of distributor, why are you wasting time measuring ignition coil? You know it works!

Now measure and test:
  • spark-plug wires
  • spark plugs themselves
  • firing order of plug wires on distributor cap
  • cam timing

Do you have official Toyota workshop-manual? This is what dealers mechanics use and there are troubleshoooting flowcharts and test-measurements that are extremely effective (least amount of time and money needed).

Have you done compression test? I got engine from breakers once. Everything electronic tested fine. Engine just wouldn't start! Cam timing was spot-on. Compression-test showed 0-psi across board!!! Took a look down spark-plug hole with camera... PISTONS and CON-RODS were missing!! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That reading of 11.5-12.55 K-ohms is correct for 2ndary coil.
You already got spark out of distributor, why are you wasting time measuring ignition coil? You know it works!

Now measure and test:
  • spark-plug wires
  • spark plugs themselves
  • distributor cap and rotors
  • firing order of plug wires on distributor cap
  • cam timing

Do you have official Toyota workshop-manual? This is what dealers mechanics use and there are troubleshoooting flowcharts and test-measurements that are extremely effective (least amount of time and money needed).
I'm confused how can my reading of 11.5 -12.5 k ohms be correct for a functioning distributor. I ask because the spark seemed weak and I have seen videos of other people testing these cars and with weak spark it wouldn't start just like mine.

the manual says 550 ohms max did you see the picture I posted? how is 12.5k ohms = 550 ohms? please explain
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If ignition-coil is bad... Why would you buy $800 distributor to replace $100 part???

That reading of 11.5-12.55 K-ohms is correct for 2ndary coil. You already got spark out of distributor, why are you wasting time measuring ignition coil? You know it works!

Now measure and test:
  • spark-plug wires
  • spark plugs themselves
  • firing order of plug wires on distributor cap
  • cam timing

Do you have official Toyota workshop-manual? This is what dealers mechanics use and there are troubleshoooting flowcharts and test-measurements that are extremely effective (least amount of time and money needed).

Have you done compression test? I got engine from breakers once. Everything electronic tested fine. Engine just wouldn't start! Cam timing was spot-on. Compression-test showed 0-psi across board!!! Took a look down spark-plug hole with camera... PISTONS and CON-RODS were missing!! :eek:
engine has compression the shop I have it at got it to run after I took it in but then the car died. They said it sounded good while it was running. The engine just died on me while driving very quietly . also with cranking the engine you can tell it has compression because the engine spins like always did no compression would spin really fast
 

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Your screenshot doesn't show because we have to be logged onto your Google account to see it. Please post your account & password.

DO NOT buy anything but OEM distributor from authorised Toyota dealer.
Read this thread: List of confirmed distributor-at-fault issues

Did you scan ECU for error codes? Should be 1st step.

When was last time distributor-cap and rotor replaced? With genuine OEM Toyota parts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Your screenshot doesn't show because we have to be logged onto your Google account to see it. Please post your account & password.

DO NOT buy anything but OEM distributor from authorised Toyota dealer.
Read this thread: List of confirmed distributor-at-fault issues

Did you scan ECU for error codes? Should be 1st step.

When was last time distributor-cap and rotor replaced? With genuine OEM Toyota parts?
ECU shows no codes I have a obd scanner
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
also I dont even know where to buy an OEM distributor for a 25 year old car. I much rather gamble on 60$ first this car aint worth 1000$ if I have to spend that much to fix it I'm going to get rid of it
 

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Sure, you've got 2 used junk-yard distributors. It's extremely unlikely that all three distributors you have are defective. Measure ignition-coil from all 3. Junkyards are where most people go since they can get genuine OEM Denso distributors. Which are preferred over anything else.

You've got wrong manual, throw it away. Here's proper specs on ignition-coil:


G and NE sensors tell ECU speed of engine-rotation and which rotational-position it's in relative to TDC. On earlier '93-95 models, both sensors were in distributor. On '95.5-97 OBD-II cars, NE sensor was moved near crank to become CPS. Neither of which has anything to do with ignition-coil. Measure resistance of both sensors at sensor-connector themselves. Then again at ECU connector to verify wiring is OK in between.



Specs on '95.5-97 cam/crank sensors are:
The signal generator (pick-up coil) resistance cold should be 185-275 ohms on G+ and G-
The crank position sensor (pick-up coil) resistance cold should be 1630-2740 ohms on NE and NE-
If you want to keep on wasting time and money on this car doing ineffective replacement of perfectly-working parts with brand-new perfectly working parts, have at it. After your 50th parts swap and hundreds of $$$ later, you may randomly replace one part that's actually bad. In this case, it's most likely some sort of wiring problem that can be found easily in 5-minutes of measuring.
 

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If you read the linked thread, you can see that buying an OEM distributor is not necessary.

To clarify, here are the correct resistance ranges for OBD-I.

Primary Coil Resistance: 1.11 to 1.75 ohm
Secondary Coil Resistance: 9-15.7 kohm
Air Gap: 0.2-0.4 mm
G: 185-275 ohm
NE: 370-550 ohm

So to answer your question, your readings for the secondary coil sound like they're in the right range.
 

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If you read the linked thread, you can see that buying an OEM distributor is not necessary.

To clarify, here are the correct resistance ranges for OBD-I.

Primary Coil Resistance: 1.11 to 1.75 ohm
Secondary Coil Resistance: 9-15.7 kohm
Air Gap: 0.2-0.4 mm
G: 185-275 ohm
NE: 370-550 ohm

So to answer your question, your readings for the secondary coil sound like they're in the right range.
Those specs are for '93-95 OBD-I cars. OBD-II cars with CPS has different sensor specs. Which are irrelevant tests since he's got spark; ECU is detecting correct timing events. If weak spark, something is wrong at ignition-coil and downstream.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh snap you are right but I might have gotten a dizzy from a 4afe or a OBD1 car.........
I thought it didn't matter mine definitely doesn't have the adjustment like OBD1 dizzys i hoping I just need new plugs and wires



Sure, you've got 2 used junk-yard distributors. It's extremely unlikely that all three distributors you have are defective. Measure ignition-coil from all 3. Junkyards are where most people go since they can get genuine OEM Denso distributors. Which are preferred over anything else.

You've got wrong manual, throw it away. Here's proper specs on ignition-coil:


G and NE sensors ECU speed of engine-rotation and which rotational-position it's in relative to TDC. On earlier '93-95 models, both sensors were in distributor. On '95.5-97 OBD-II cars, NE sensor was moved near crank to become CPS. Neither of which has anything to do with ignition-coil. Measure resistance of both sensors at sensor-connector themselves. Then again at ECU connector to verify wiring is OK in between.



Specs on '95.5-97 cam/crank sensors are:


If you want to keep on wasting time and money on this car doing ineffective replacement of perfectly-working parts with brand-new perfectly working parts, have at it. After your 50th parts swap and hundreds of $$$ later, you may randomly replace one part that's actually bad. In this case, it's most likely some sort of wiring problem that can be found easily in 5-minutes of measuring.
Sure, you've got 2 used junk-yard distributors. It's extremely unlikely that all three distributors you have are defective. Measure ignition-coil from all 3. Junkyards are where most people go since they can get genuine OEM Denso distributors. Which are preferred over anything else.

You've got wrong manual, throw it away. Here's proper specs on ignition-coil:


G and NE sensors ECU speed of engine-rotation and which rotational-position it's in relative to TDC. On earlier '93-95 models, both sensors were in distributor. On '95.5-97 OBD-II cars, NE sensor was moved near crank to become CPS. Neither of which has anything to do with ignition-coil. Measure resistance of both sensors at sensor-connector themselves. Then again at ECU connector to verify wiring is OK in between.



Specs on '95.5-97 cam/crank sensors are:


If you want to keep on wasting time and money on this car doing ineffective replacement of perfectly-working parts with brand-new perfectly working parts, have at it. After your 50th parts swap and hundreds of $$$ later, you may randomly replace one part that's actually bad. In this case, it's most likely some sort of wiring problem that can be found easily in 5-minutes of measuring.
you convinced me to not buy a distributor yet. im going to get plugs and wires though
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you read the linked thread, you can see that buying an OEM distributor is not necessary.

To clarify, here are the correct resistance ranges for OBD-I.

Primary Coil Resistance: 1.11 to 1.75 ohm
Secondary Coil Resistance: 9-15.7 kohm
Air Gap: 0.2-0.4 mm
G: 185-275 ohm
NE: 370-550 ohm

So to answer your question, your readings for the secondary coil sound like they're in the right range.
thanks my car is obd2 but yea I think my distributor is probably good I think I need wires and plugs next. I was doing 95mph on the highway a couple days before it died and I noticed the car wouldn't go any faster than that. was probably already dying at that point because I remember I hit 105 when I first bought it
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks my car is obd2 but yea I think my distributor is probably good I think I need wires and plugs next. I was doing 95mph on the highway a couple days before it died and I noticed the car wouldn't go any faster than that. was probably already dying at that point because I remember I hit 105 when I first bought it
this was on a race track. in mexico.
 

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There's way to manually trigger ignition coils to make them spark. Then you can verify which one has strongest spark to use. Might be too dangerous, especially if you have any heart conditions.

Weak spark may definitely be worn-out distributor cap & rotor. Especially if you see weak spark before it even goes through plug-wires and plugs. Those wear out much quicker than plugs & plug-wires. And when cap & rotor goes, it can be very sudden.

Post some photos of terminals inside cap & tip of rotor. If they're rough & porous looking, definitely bad. Sometimes, carbon-button wears out 1st. Definitely buy OEM, i've never gotten bad new OEM one. Had many 3rd-party ones be bad right out of box. Someone recently did comparison with actual length measurements and rotor was too short on aftermarket one that didn't work.
 

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We’re there any signs of surging inside the rotor?
 
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