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straight cash homie
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http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2016/10/sports-car-market-after-the-baby-boomers/
Baby Boomers are getting too old for traditional sports cars. Their purchasing power may have ushered in the initial success of the muscle car (as well as its resurrection), but no 70-plus-year-old wants to obliterate their pelvis crawling into a low-slung coupe or have its rock-hard suspension rattle the dentures out of their mouth.

That leaves the younger generations to champion the sports car going forward, and — I am very sad to say — they will not be up to the task.

While there are still younger consumers who enjoy the pursuit of speed, males born between 1946 and 1964 buy most of the sports cars currently on the market, and their peak spending years are rapidly fading in the rear-view. They also are becoming less interested in uncompromising sports cars when there are performance oriented SUVs and crossovers at the ready. These are options that offer expanded practicality and comfort at the moderate expense of performance. It’s a tempting alternative for someone who grunts in discomfort every time they are required to stand up.

The proof is in the sales. Porsche, for example, has suffered an eight percent drop in passenger car sales from 2015. But their Macan crossover has grown by 30 percent this year, making it Porsche’s best selling vehicle. Speaking to Bloomberg, company spokesman Christian Koenig attributed the decline in car sales to replacement of the 911 and Boxster, which caused an inventory shortage, and the announcement of a new Panamera. While that could be true, it doesn’t mean everyone who was waiting on a new sedan or coupe decided to buy a crossover to tide themselves over. That isn’t how things work.

In the United States, Camaro and Corvette sales were down last year and look to stay there for the rest of this one. Ford just stalled plant production on the Mustang due to reduced demand. And, in a good year, Mazda’s new and highly praised Miata can only expect to bring in half the sales it would have received in 2006.

The winds have shifted, unequivocally. Boomers are getting away from the sports car and there is no one to fill the void. Generation X doesn’t have the numbers and Millennials may not be up the the challenge financially.

The automotive stereotype of Millennials has been that of a college-educated urbanite disinterested in anything but public transportation, perpetually scoffing at your antiquated transit practices. In reality, the average 29 year old is not college educated, lives in the suburbs, and needs to have access to a car just to get downtown, according to statistics published by The Atlantic. Unfortunately, that doesn’t make them good candidates for future sports car ownership, as they also only rake in about $35,000 annually and don’t have the job security or disposable income necessary to feel comfortable buying one.

CarLab, a consulting firm in Orange, California, told Bloomberg that research shows 20-somethings still like sporty cars, but they can’t afford them yet.

Even when presented with a moderately affordable option, Millennials have taken a pass. Subaru’s BRZ and Toyota’s 86 are sister cars that couldn’t be more clearly marketed toward younger buyers on a reasonable budget. Both have suffered a diminishing return on sales in the U.S. since 2013. And it isn’t like every one of previously mentioned American muscle cars doesn’t offer an affordable smaller-engined alternative. In fact, one of the few performance oriented vehicles that has remained popular with younger buyers over the years is the WRX — a practical sporting car that doesn’t have two doors or rear-wheel drive.

With boomers moving over to premium branded crossovers and Millennials too poor to afford even a base model Camaro, let alone a Corvette at twice that price, the mid-range sports car market is going to have some extremely awkward years ahead of it. It’s hard to imagine, but we may actually see the Mustang become a discontinued model someday. I just hope they replace it with something a younger person can actually afford.
So true...cars like the Toyobaru aren't as practical as four doors, so the alternatives sell better. I would hope Toyota can build a four door sports car but cheaper, like an Altezza/1st Gen IS.
 

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So true. Latest national polls have clearly indicated that Millennials, if given a choice, would rather have the latest smart phone than own a car, even if it means taking public transportation. For me personally, screw that.
 

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So true. Latest national polls have clearly indicated that Millennials, if given a choice, would rather have the latest smart phone than own a car, even if it means taking public transportation. For me personally, screw that.


Good for the millennials:thumbup: They're the ones that advocate for conservation and cleaner air. Car insurance, especially for sports cars would be very high let alone maintenance, since many of today's cars aren't Do It Yourself friendly.
 

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Every new generation gets ragged on by the last one (or two). It's just a thing that happens. Each new generation grows up in a different world and it's sometimes difficult to understand it all. In 20 years, the millennials will all be bitching about whoever is next.

Trust me.
 

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I think I disagree.

The sports cars in the late 50's and 60's (we'll leave out 70's due to OPEC) that we all think about include vehicles like the Camaro, the Mustang, Corvette, Charger and the like.

The stark truth is that most of those cars weren't sold with high-end/high power options, and in fact many vehicles sold today like SUV's and minivans would actually outperform those vehicles even when new.

Yes, there were exotics then (high end versions, plus Cobra's and other exotics), plus modified vehicles - and that hasn't and I doubt will change.

What might change, is what a "sports car" looks like. A great example is comparing a 700+hp Hellcat (which primarily has one goal - go fast in a straight line) against a Tesla P100D..... which is a sleek 4 door electric vehicle..... and in most instances will walk the Hellcat the entire 1/4 mile.
 

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The stark truth is that most of those cars weren't sold with high-end/high power options, and in fact many vehicles sold today like SUV's and minivans would actually outperform those vehicles even when new.
Very true. My Highlander is faster than the dual carb Triumph TR7 I owned back in the day. My Highlander can pull 6.8 seconds zero to 60, and the TR7 was 7 seconds flat. I understand the Range Rover can pull 5 seconds flat, the same as the Porsche Turbo Carrera from thirty years ago. Imagine that.
 

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Porsche now makes vehicles that can do 0-60 in 2.5 seconds.

BUT

Speed is not all that makes a sports car. I've owned a TR250, TR6, and a number of Miatas that were all very much sports cars and all were under 200 HP (some way under) and some of them had marginal brakes. They were all a blast to drive.

Even my Honda Accord Sport is faster than a LOT of so called 60s muscle cars were (and it out handles and out stops them by a mile)... but it's no sports car.
 

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Porsche now makes vehicles that can do 0-60 in 2.5 seconds.

BUT

Speed is not all that makes a sports car. I've owned a TR250, TR6, and a number of Miatas that were all very much sports cars and all were under 200 HP (some way under) and some of them had marginal brakes. They were all a blast to drive.

Even my Honda Accord Sport is faster than a LOT of so called 60s muscle cars were (and it out handles and out stops them by a mile)... but it's no sports car.

..Yet which will retain value better and be more sought after, the Accord Sport or 1969 Dodge Charger?:smile:
 
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So true...cars like the Toyobaru aren't as practical as four doors, so the alternatives sell better. I would hope Toyota can build a four door sports car but cheaper, like an Altezza/1st Gen IS.
I wouldn't mind a newer version of this car. It can sit right beside my older version. :D

edit: I'm referring to the IS. Don't know why the quote isn't showing up in the post.
 

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..Yet which will retain value better and be more sought after, the Accord Sport or 1969 Dodge Charger?:smile:
Zythr... who cares? I wouldn't drive a 69 Charger any further than the nearest auction. In 2 years, the Accord will be replaced with another one... because I can.
 

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Porsche now makes vehicles that can do 0-60 in 2.5 seconds.

BUT

Speed is not all that makes a sports car. I've owned a TR250, TR6, and a number of Miatas that were all very much sports cars and all were under 200 HP (some way under) and some of them had marginal brakes. They were all a blast to drive.

Even my Honda Accord Sport is faster than a LOT of so called 60s muscle cars were (and it out handles and out stops them by a mile)... but it's no sports car.

exactly. Sports cars come in many forms and its subjective. But you're right, if you want to be true to the form of sports car its about a car that is "athletic." meaning its great connection to the road and of course handles well.


Comparing cars now to cars 50 or so years ago is apples to oranges. Cars in themselves have improved so much obviously. Even cars now compared to 10 years ago or even 5 are better, most of them. Naturally.
 

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The quotes missing happens from time to time....


Oddly enough, you guys are making my point exactly. What is a "sports car"? Is it a Ferrari La Ferrari? Is it a TR6? Is it an MR2? Is it a WRX STI? Mustang, Camaro, Corvette, Charger, Challenger?

An MR2, TR6, Miata and the like are excellent Auto-x, twisty-back roads, road course car. They are generally terrible practical and drag cars. Some people hate auto-x, some people hate drag racing. The ideas of a "sports car" between the thoughts varies.

However, to say that the "sports car will die" is silly. People will always want to go fast - and although there's always been a group of people who want to go fast (in whatever fashion that is) there's always a larger group of people who either just want "a car" or "a nice looking car". It's why there were 6 cylinder versions of the Camaro in the late 60's - a great looking "performance" car that did all of a 17-18 second quarter mile.

The Miata would have been an incredibly silly and laughed at vehicle in the 60's. There are tons of Miata's driving around still to this day, where most of the owners just want a "fun" car.... but never do anything fun with it. There are also a lot of modified Miata's - new and old. It's because the people who are "car people" want to modify it - make it faster, lower, handle/brake better (etc). That is what isn't going to change.

So my point still stands - sports cars will survive in some form, but they may look different.
 

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They could buy used for a much better price than getting new. Is what I did with my Genesis coupe buying for $20k used instead of $35k new. Hard to see how stangs and camaros aren't selling well since there are scat tons of them and chargers in my area. I don't care how old I get I'm driving something that can drive quick and handle well whenever needed. If my hips hurt getting in and out of it at that time then so be it I can tough it out.
 
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