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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was wanting to go to wider tires. The OEM Bridgsetones hydroplane pretty wicked, so I am thinking something like 255/55R18.
Any concerns I should know about? Seems I have many choices in this size to choose from for an all season tire. Not needed for snow, just dry and wet performance.

thx
 

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Wider tire will hydroplane more.

Stock size, will assume, is 245/60/18. Its easy and better to pick a better quality tire in the correct size. Speedometer is most likely already optimistic. Shorter tire that you mentioned would make it even worse. Slightly taller tire would correct it.

245/60/18....29.6"
255/55/18... 29" fools choice
235/65/18....30"
255/60/18 ...30"
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wider tire will hydroplane more.

Stock size, will assume, is 245/60/18. Its easy and better to pick a better quality tire in the correct size. Speedometer is most likely already optimistic. Shorter tire that you mentioned would make it even worse. Slightly taller tire would correct it.

245/60/18....29.6"
255/55/18... 29" fools choice
235/65/18....30"
255/60/18 ...30"
Good points...I'm now thinking the 255/60/18 ...30" would give me the wider contact patch I'm seeking and a bit taller, but nothing too far off the baseline OEM size - 245/60/18. But certainly your point that a better tire of the same size is valid.

What do you think of this option instead - 255/60/18?
 

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Good points...I'm now thinking the 255/60/18 ...30" would give me the wider contact patch I'm seeking and a bit taller,
So you want to hydroplane more? Is that what you're after. A narrower tire is better to prevent hydroplaning.

Besides tire width....tire tread pattern can have a huge on hydroplaning. Some tires are far better then others.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So you want to hydroplane more? Is that what you're after. A narrower tire is better to prevent hydroplaning.

Besides tire width....tire tread pattern can have a huge on hydroplaning. Some tires are far better then others.
Do you really feel that going from 29.6 to 30" wide is going to make that much of a difference? Getting new tires to replace the OEM BS isn't focused on hydroplaning, but my assumption is that ANY other tire would be better than the stock BS tire.
 

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...ANY other tire would be better than the stock BS tire.
In general this is true. Note that 29.6" to 30" is going TALLER, not wider - the first number in a tire size is the tire width (usually in millimeters). And the focus on hydroplaning is only because you mentioned it in the 1st post as an issue. Again, in general a wider tire would have a tendency to hydroplane more/easier than a narrower tire, all things being equal. But of course all things are not equal due to tread pattern, rubber compound, quality, etc. For me, i up-sized to 265 width Nitto 420s summer tires and they are awesome for grip, better than stocks in the rain (but then again, i didn't have an issue with the stocks to begin with). They are also 30.3" tall (size 265/40/22), which only affects the speedometer (maybe some handling and harshness, but that's due to the 22" wheels, not a taller tire). FWIW my stock tires are Michelin Latitude Tours with ~25k miles, after the 1st year have only been used as winter tires, and still have probably 1/2 their tread left.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In general this is true. Note that 29.6" to 30" is going TALLER, not wider - the first number in a tire size is the tire width (usually in millimeters). And the focus on hydroplaning is only because you mentioned it in the 1st post as an issue. Again, in general a wider tire would have a tendency to hydroplane more/easier than a narrower tire, all things being equal. But of course all things are not equal due to tread pattern, rubber compound, quality, etc. For me, i up-sized to 265 width Nitto 420s summer tires and they are awesome for grip, better than stocks in the rain (but then again, i didn't have an issue with the stocks to begin with). They are also 30.3" tall (size 265/40/22), which only affects the speedometer (maybe some handling and harshness, but that's due to the 22" wheels, not a taller tire). FWIW my stock tires are Michelin Latitude Tours with ~25k miles, after the 1st year have only been used as winter tires, and still have probably 1/2 their tread left.
Correct on the taller aspect...They would be taller and wider, but not by much.
 

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I was wanting to go to wider tires. The OEM Bridgsetones hydroplane pretty wicked, so I am thinking something like 255/55R18.
Any concerns I should know about? Seems I have many choices in this size to choose from for an all season tire. Not needed for snow, just dry and wet performance.

thx
How many miles on your OEM tires? All tires will increase their tendency to hydroplane as the tire wears and the volume of the space that is available to shed water between the treads gets smaller. Tire Rack has tests of various tires that you can review to judge resistance to hydroplaning between tire manufacturers. Tread design is also a factor that determines a tire's resistance to hydroplaning. I would recommend you review the test results of available tires in OEM size before switching tire size. My 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
How many miles on your OEM tires? All tires will increase their tendency to hydroplane as the tire wears and the volume of the space that is available to shed water between the treads gets smaller. Tire Rack has tests of various tires that you can review to judge resistance to hydroplaning between tire manufacturers. Tread design is also a factor that determines a tire's resistance to hydroplaning. I would recommend you review the test results of available tires in OEM size before switching tire size. My 2 cents.
16K miles on the OEM BS's....Yes, the fronts had more wear than the rears, but it's clear these tires don't have a long life as seen in the stats below. On a positive note, these tires have been extremely quite on roads and small bump absorption has been absolutely stellar. That said, I like the OEM tires, but you'll be replacing them more often.

Today I installed a set of 255/60/19 Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S - W speed rated (yes, far higher than the HL can handle but for $158/tire, it wasn't a bad deal. I've attatched the tirerack specs for each tire. They are pretty even overall, with the exception of life span.

I've only put a few miles on since having them installed and haven't been on the FRWY yet, but here's my initial observations with the Goodyear's and the 255 wider patch. The steering feels more natural and fluid when turning. The stature of the vehicle also has a more rugged feel to it. Noise seems to be a little more noticeable in comparison. BS set the bar for comfort and low noise, and thus far, the Eagle Sport's are stiffer feeling over smaller bumps, but not in a bad way.

In short, with limited time on them and since they are rated with a higher speed rating, are about 5lbs heavier and .4" wider, the vehicle feels more planted on the pavement, but maybe not as responsive to accelerator movements either - acceleration isn't as twitchy and have a more smoother acceleration feel now (heavier tires probably). Lastly, I feel like I'm in a "beefier" vehicle now....but the OEM also perform well.

I'll need more time on them to decide which I ultimately prefer, but each have their strengths I suppose.

Here's the charts.

1123191121_HDR.jpg 1123191035b_HDR.jpg
 

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Do you really feel that going from 29.6 to 30" wide is going to make that much of a difference?
The point is you're the one wanting to go wider to PREVENT hydroplaning. The wider tires may not be noticeably worse...but it sure isn't helping you prevent hydroplaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In general this is true. Note that 29.6" to 30" is going TALLER, not wider - the first number in a tire size is the tire width (usually in millimeters). And the focus on hydroplaning is only because you mentioned it in the 1st post as an issue. Again, in general a wider tire would have a tendency to hydroplane more/easier than a narrower tire, all things being equal. But of course all things are not equal due to tread pattern, rubber compound, quality, etc. For me, i up-sized to 265 width Nitto 420s summer tires and they are awesome for grip, better than stocks in the rain (but then again, i didn't have an issue with the stocks to begin with). They are also 30.3" tall (size 265/40/22), which only affects the speedometer (maybe some handling and harshness, but that's due to the 22" wheels, not a taller tire). FWIW my stock tires are Michelin Latitude Tours with ~25k miles, after the 1st year have only been used as winter tires, and still have probably 1/2 their tread left.
Did you find your HL has more movement being that you went up to the 30.3" tall size? I won't go more than 30" and will probably end up going back to 29.6 or lower height.
 

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Did you find your HL has more movement being that you went up to the 30.3" tall size? I won't go more than 30" and will probably end up going back to 29.6 or lower height.
By movement i assume you mean feeling the tire sidewall flex?
Less movement - because i went with 22" rims so there's less tire sidewall (only about 4" vs the stock 5 3/4")
 

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Discussion Starter #13
By movement i assume you mean feeling the tire sidewall flex?
Less movement - because i went with 22" rims so there's less tire sidewall (only about 4" vs the stock 5 3/4")
Correct, I was referring to sidewall flex. Ah yes, I see, if you are only around 4", that's quite as bit less sidewall, but interesting that you've increase the overall height. Do you know the weight of your tires? OEM's are sub 30 lbs. My new GY's are 34 lbs. I found that the OEM tires roll very well (less unsprung weight).

My only complaint at this point is the the taller sidewalls on these tires, otherwise they are working well. I'd like to go to shorter profile at some point to reduce some flex. I do find slightly more steering input is required on the FRWY, probably due to the added flex.
 

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Just googling, seems they're about 36.5 lbs. Keep in mind they're wider too (265/40/22). Clearly i'm not concerned about unsprung weight (I'm guessing my 22" rims weigh more than stocks), this is aesthetic. I do not have a problem with how the HL handled stock, or with the 22"s on. I can understand people's desire to "increase performance and handling" but nothing i do with it comes close to the stock limits of it, even in inclement weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just googling, seems they're about 36.5 lbs. Keep in mind they're wider too (265/40/22). Clearly i'm not concerned about unsprung weight (I'm guessing my 22" rims weigh more than stocks), this is aesthetic. I do not have a problem with how the HL handled stock, or with the 22"s on. I can understand people's desire to "increase performance and handling" but nothing i do with it comes close to the stock limits of it, even in inclement weather.
Yes, 265 is wider than 245 or 255. Wow, your sidewall height it dramatically lower. Heavier tires and wheels for sure. Probably more than I want to go, but understand you are strictly for looks. I didn't want to deviate dramatically from OEM tires since they worked pretty good until they wore down and introduced more hydroplane effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The point is you're the one wanting to go wider to PREVENT hydroplaning. The wider tires may not be noticeably worse...but it sure isn't helping you prevent hydroplaning.
The new tires work great in the rain! I just tested them in deep puddles and there was no hydroplaning....Boy did I create some massive water roost from the side. Very impressive in comparison. I also think the heavier tires help to keep the tread on the ground which is needed to limit or prevent hydroplaning.
 
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