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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
89 Camry 3sfe timing belt change write-up with some pictures

Timing belt changing on 89 Camry with 3s-fe engine
The purpose of this masterpiece is to supplement the timing belt changing instructions outlined in the Toyota repair manual in order to help people with limited experience to avoid mistakes.
The timing belt change jobs can be divided into the three categories:
  • Routine change due to recommended mileage or age interval or when the used car is purchased with unknown timing belt change history;
  • The timing belt needs to be removed in order to change the leaking water pump, oil seal or noisy idler bearing;
  • The timing belt is broken.
The categories number 1 and 2 [the belt is neither broken nor jumped the teeth and valve timing is NOT lost] are going to be covered in the following work.

1. Prepare necessary tools:
· Breaker bar,1/2 inch drive, with step-down adapter and 19 mm socket
· 12 inch long extension 3/8 inch drive
· 17 and 14 mm deep sockets 3/8 inch drive
· ¼ inch drive ratchet with 10 mm socket
· 12/14 mm offset box wrench
· 3/8 inch drive short metric sockets, 10 to 22 mm size, 8 and 3 inches long extensions, spark plug socket and reversible ratchet
· 10 mm box end offset wrench or 10mm combo wrench;
· Torque wrench 20 to 90 foot lbs
· Harmonic balancer puller
· Crankshaft pulley holding device

· Mirror
· Paint marker
· At least one jack stand and jack
· Copy of belt changing procedure from repair manual [http://www.camrystuff.com/manuals/Gen2/Engine_Mechanical.pdf, pages EM23 toEM33].

Note: additional tools can be required.
2. Undo the crankshaft bolt:
If the previous service have been done by franchise or tire shop, the crank bolt can be too tight: if electrical impact gun cannot break it loose, the local tire shop may undo the bolt for you, ad then snug it back so you will be able to remove it yourself. Do not attempt to go fast or far after this procedure; go straight back to the belt change.
  • Turn the front wheel to the right; set the parking brake;
  • Disconnect negative battery cable
  • Break loose the lug nuts on the front right wheel,
  • Raise the car and place it on the jack stand
  • Remove the wheel and the splash shield to expose the pulley
  • Lock the pulley with holding device
  • Break the bolt loose using breaker bar or impact gun.
3. Time for power steering reservoir and right front motor mount:
  • Unbolt power steering fluid reservoir bracket and move it away without disconnecting hoses; you may wrap plastic bag around it. I also used solid wire to temporary strap the reservoir to the top of the strut tower to keep it out of the way
  • Place the jack under the engine using care to prevent the oil pan damage
  • Remove nuts and bolts on the top of motor mount and mounting bracket
  • Use deep 17 mm socket to remove the most difficult nut facing the firewall; use caution to retrieve it as there almost no space to there [in most difficult case you may need to make some sort of “tool” to catch this nut].
4. Down the fender well:
· Slide the special wrench between the frame rail and the power steering pump pulley and place its head on the pivot bolt, figure below:

· With the aid of the cheater, break this bolt loose then loosen it about ¾ turn
· Using 14 mm offset box wrench, loosen the belt tension bolt, move the power steering pump toward the engine and slip the belt of the pump pulley, let it hang down on the crank pulley;
· After verifying that jack under the engine is secure, remove two nuts in the green rectangle; this will separate engine block from mounting bracket. Use 12 inch extension and 14 mm deep socket for this purpose, figure below:

5. Motor mount, timing stetting, and alternator’s time:
  • Remove the motor mount and bracket as one piece; it is not possible by design to remove just bracket, then motor mount. Once off the car they can be separated if necessary; figure below

  • Remove the spark plugs
  • Pull the 3 inch rubber plug from upper timing belt cover to expose the timing hole on the cam sprocket; place 22 mm socket on the alternator pulley and rotate it clockwise using ratchet
  • With the aid of mirror align the timing hole in the sprocket with the mark on the cam bearing housing as outlined in the manual.
  • Now make sure that the timing mark on the crank pulley lines up with “0” on the timing scale
  • Disconnect and remove alternator and its bracket
  • Remove drive belts from the crank pulley
  • Completely remove crank pulley bolt
  • Using harmonic balancer puller or bar type puller take the pulley off [use M6 class10.8 or stronger screws to attach puller to the pulley]
  • Using 10 mm socket and ¼ inch drive ratchet, remove the timing cover screws and timing covers; the upper cover may come out easier if the power steering return pipe is pushed toward the strut tower. Moving engine up or down with the jack may also help to maneuver the upper cover out
  • Remove the timing belt guide
6. The fun with the belt:
The “pretension” of the belt is done by a tension roller spring during the manual rotation of the engine right after the belt installation; once the roller’s bolt is tightened, spring has no effect on the belt tension.
In order to assure correct timing phase there should be certain number of belt teeth between two timed pulleys [cam and crank]

  • Using quick drying marking pen, place the marks on the cam sprocket and #3 timing cover; this will make the cam position easy to see, figure below

  • Match mark the belt to the cam sprocket as illustrated, figure below

  • Match mark the belt relative to the crank sprocket, figure below

  • Mark the side of the belt which is facing the radiator
  • Loosen the belt tension roller bolt
  • Use appropriate tool to push the roller down to free up the belt, then temporary tighten the roller bolt
  • Slide the belt out
  • Place random mark on the new belt [two teeth next to each other]
  • Line up old and new belts side by side on the flat level surface and align the marks
  • Transfer remaining mark from old to the new belt
  • This will assure same number of teeth between the marks on old and new belt which is critical to set the timing phase.
  • Inspect rollers, seals, bearings and do necessary repairs
  • Install the new belt, make sure that each of the marked teeth on the sprockets is placed between 2 marked teeth on the belt, figure below


  • Loosen the bolt to allow the tension roller to contact the belt under spring force
  • Install the belt guide, lower timing cover and crankshaft pulley, snag the pulley bolt in
  • Rotate engine 2 full turns clockwise and recheck the timing marks
  • Rotate the engine clockwise 1 and 7/8 turns and tighten the tension roller bolt to about 35 foot-pounds
  • Install the upper timing cover and the rubber plug
7. Proceed to assembly:
  • Place the motor mount and bracket on its position then insert the long bolt in red square into its hole and begin to thread it in. This will bring the mounting bracket and the engine block into the proper alignment in order to install and tighten 2 engine to mounting bracket nuts, figure below


  • Once nuts are tightened remove the long bolt, place mounting bracket to alternator bracket brace and install all bolts and nuts to secure bracket to the mount and mount to the body. Reinstall and tighten the long “alignment“ bolt
  • Install spark plugs, alternator and drive belts
  • Remove jack from under the engine
  • Position holding device on the crank pulley
  • Place torque wrench on the crank pulley bolt, torque to 80 foot pounds
  • Install splash guard and wheel
  • Lower the car, torque the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds
  • Install the power steering reservoir
  • Reconnect the battery
You should be ready to go.
 

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Dr J thanks for all the great tips and insight. So can you tell me where to start from scratch on setting up the timing phasing if the belt has jumped time? I got under the bottom cover today tp discover that the belt was loose because the stationary idler pulley bearing was distroyed. The balls and pieces of the bearing were laying at the bottom. I will also check my other post. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
If the car suddenly began to run poorly (rough idle warm, lack of power) the belt is most likely jumped the timing.
if no symptoms like that were experienced, and the belt is still on the pulleys you may do the following:
match mark belt to the crank and cam pulleys (and cam pulley to the cover #3; do not worry about timing marks at this point)
remove the old belt
Remove the broken idler roller and install new one instead
install the old belt
erase marks
place the engine in TDC cylinder 1 compression stroke and align CAMsprocket to the bearing notch mark
Then check position of the crank shaft sprocket (round mark at the bottom opposite to key way-yellow dot on the photo)
if the mark on the crank is past (in clockwise) direction the cast boss on the oil pump cover (another yellow dot), the cam is timing is retarded if so
mark the cam sprocket relative to the cover number 3
mark the belt relative to the cam and crank sprocket
then count number of teeth the timing is off (one tooth in most cases)
place random mark on the new belt
remove the old belt
place belts next to each other and line up the marks
THEN place the second mark on the new belt that it is closer to the first mark on the new belt by one tooth (or the number of teeth the belt jumped) as compared to the old belt
(for example there were 36 teeth between the marks on the jumped belt and the belt jumped 1 tooth so on the new belt you will have 36-1 = 35 teeth [numbers are random])
 

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:headbang:Completed the install and ran engine. No joy. Engine running rough and now removing top cover to reinspect timing marks. Any suggestions as to which way to move the cam gear relative to the belt? Clockwise to advance? I know it has to be off but I swear I had all marks lined up as per the manual.
 

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3s-gte in a Camry?!?
'89 Camry Alltrac
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:headbang:Completed the install and ran engine. No joy. Engine running rough and now removing top cover to reinspect timing marks. Any suggestions as to which way to move the cam gear relative to the belt? Clockwise to advance? I know it has to be off but I swear I had all marks lined up as per the manual.
You probably need to rotate the cam back (top towards the back of the car). If you look at the pictures above, you can see when everything is aligned at 0 and installed in the car, it looks like the cam is rotated about 10* back (in line with the motor, not vertical to the ground).

-Charlie
 

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"GOT ER DUN" Removed covers to verify timing phase. Everything was good as I had already knew it was right. Anyway still ran rough, put in new Denso plugs and threw away the 1-1/2 year old E-3 plugs. Runs good now. Thanks for all the help from all you wrenchers out there, young and old.
 

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I plan on pulling my water pump and oil pump and possibly replacing the timing belt and components in the next month. Looking over my all data manual the only part that appears to be stumping me is the push rod installation.

Can someone please go into detail just exactly what you need to do. People seem to go through this like it's second nature in diy threads. I still don't understand it completely. I have done most work outside of timing belts and hopefully this will be fairly easy.

my all data manuals says..

1. Place a plate washer between the tensioner and a block.
2. Using a press, slowly press in the push rod using 100 - 1.000 kg (220 - 2,205 lb, 981 - 9,607 N) of pressure.
3. Align the holes of the push rod and housing, and pass a 1.27 mm hexagon wrench (sized 1.27 mm) through the holes to keep the setting position of the push rod.
4. Release the press.
 

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Great Stuff Doc'

Remove the motor mount and bracket as one piece; it is not possible by design to remove just bracket, then motor mount. Once off the car they can be separated if necessary;

It is possible however to remove the mount & leave the bracket attached to the block, creating a needless second step; trust me I just did it:headbang:

I had not searched out this info, this used with the FSM will the job a-heck-of-allot-simpler.


Thanks Doc'
JS
 

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3s-gte in a Camry?!?
'89 Camry Alltrac
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I plan on pulling my water pump and oil pump and possibly replacing the timing belt and components in the next month. Looking over my all data manual the only part that appears to be stumping me is the push rod installation.

Can someone please go into detail just exactly what you need to do. People seem to go through this like it's second nature in diy threads. I still don't understand it completely. I have done most work outside of timing belts and hopefully this will be fairly easy.

my all data manuals says..

1. Place a plate washer between the tensioner and a block.
2. Using a press, slowly press in the push rod using 100 - 1.000 kg (220 - 2,205 lb, 981 - 9,607 N) of pressure.
3. Align the holes of the push rod and housing, and pass a 1.27 mm hexagon wrench (sized 1.27 mm) through the holes to keep the setting position of the push rod.
4. Release the press.
Does the V6 really have a hydraulic tensioner? The 3s-fe has a spring tensioner that doesn't require any special attention.

If it does have a hydraulic tensioner, you just need to take a few minutes (5-10) to slowly compress the tensioner. If you do it too fast, you can damage it. Really though, I would suggest getting a new one. It will be pre-compressed and ready to go, and will be less likely fail at some later date. :)

-Charlie
 

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Aloha Doctor J-
This is a great write-up. Can it be used for the V6 timing belt as well? Say in a general sense? Also, does someone make timing belts that last longer than the stock Toyota ones or is it best to stick with the stock ones? How often should these belts be changed to be on the safe side? Thank you again.
Mahalo
 

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Does the V6 really have a hydraulic tensioner? The 3s-fe has a spring tensioner that doesn't require any special attention.

If it does have a hydraulic tensioner, you just need to take a few minutes (5-10) to slowly compress the tensioner. If you do it too fast, you can damage it. Really though, I would suggest getting a new one. It will be pre-compressed and ready to go, and will be less likely fail at some later date. :)

-Charlie
Yes, that text was taken from my all data diy manual online. I can see it as well when looking under the wheel well. There is a lot of oil leaking and I think it's time to replace the cam seals, crank seal, oil pump seal, and redo the water pump seal. I will pull them and if any need replacing I will replace it.

So all I need to do is to slowly press it in until it bottoms out, then just set the allen wrench and then pull it after I set it in and it rests against the timing belt?

I would like to pull the oil pump. I asked in the other thread already but if I do not have an engine hoist, I was thinking I could jack up the engine under the oil pan with a block of wood in between, pull the timing belt side things, then put the engine mount back on so I pull the oil pan and pump, will this work?
 

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So all I need to do is to slowly press it in until it bottoms out, then just set the allen wrench and then pull it after I set it in and it rests against the timing belt?....

I was thinking I could jack up the engine under the oil pan with a block of wood in between....
That's what I did when I changed mines. I don't know if it bottomed out before the holes lined up to put the hex wrench through though. I kind of eye balled it and then tightened up the vise to where I thought the holes would line up and then just kept feeling with the wrench as I tightened it up a tiny bit at a time until it lined up.

I used a rag to keep my vise from biting into the part on either side, just to be safe.



Glen, I used this thread, the FSM and these threads to help me do my change. Jacking up the engine like holmesnmanny said was the trick for me to get the engine mount/bracket out.

http://www.tracystruesoaps.com/tutorials/gen2tb/timingbelt.html

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=178720
 
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