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Discussion Starter #1
I am interested to know in what is your prefferable tire rotation pattern of choice. And why you chose it.

I see some like the crisscross, the front to back and the front to the rears and the rears to the fronts crisscrossed.

Does it even make a difference for non-directional tires?
 

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Crisscross is fine for nons. Direction and non-directional have different patterns. Usually where you bought the tires will do it for free.
 

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Not sure why all this hoopla about tire rotations every 5k miles. I monitor the tread depth and when the rears are 2/32nds more than the fronts I rotate front to rear, also watch tire pressure meticulously. The wife's Rogue has not had a tire rotation in 37k miles. Fronts are all 6-7/32nds rears are the same. The dealership has been recommending a rotation every 5k miles, so that's 7 rotations not done and not a dime spent for nothing. Since there is a very slight difference front to rear I'll probably rotate them before winter gets here, but then she really doesnt drive in ice or snow, so I guess we will see.
Her last car a Kia Sorento had 1 rotation at 28 k miles and it was traded in, at 55k miles, with the original tires on the car at 4/32nds tread and would still pass state inspection in Virginia.
Personally I want to watch the wear patterns to see if there are alignment issues, that need to be resolved, especially if under warranty. I've bought two new cars with solid rear axles that had alignment issues. One was a 2006 Corolla, the other my current 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage. Both cars had their rear axles replaced under warranty. The Toyota was so bad Toyota gave me a new set of tires at 18k miles, but would not give me a cash or credit on better tires than the OE brand. Maybe the dealerships WANT to rotate tires so YOU WON'T KNOW YOU HAVE A BAD REAR AXLE!!!!!!!!!!
Personally I don't think 20 tire rotations in 100k miles is necessary AND I also don't like the idea of an impact bearing monkey hitting my lug nuts 80 or 100 times as a low risk operation in the same distance travelled.
Get a decent tread depth gauge and measure your tread depth, all grooves, all tires. Record the depth readings and make sure you do NOT measure at the wear indicators or your readings will be garbage.
Sure you should rotate the tires if the wear is uneven. In my old school mind THAT IS THE REASON TO ROTATE TIRES AND IT HAS BEEN THAT WAY FOR AGES.
 

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Note, my wife is one of the most cautious and careful drivers ever. Absolutely non aggressive in every respect. At first I could not believe how little difference in tread wear I measured, so I double checked and it was right. My own car I rotate front to rear (same side) since I can jack each side of the cr up and swap them very easy and I drive much more aggressively than she does so my car naturally wears the outer and inner edges of the front tires much more than hers.
She has averaged 31 MPG on her Rogue for 37 k miles and her brakes last a very long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I rotate mines 8k-10k miles. It maybe subjective on miles. But rotating, I am sure people does them.
 

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LF to LR, RF to RR, LR to RF, RR to LF. Every 5,000 miles to avoid a buildup of road noise and vibrations and to equalize tread wear (although some vibration may be noticed for a few hundred miles after the very first 5,000 mile rotation).

Same side rotations like Toyota recommended leads to tire noise as the tires get older
 

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The only time I have "rotated" my tires on our 94 camry is when I bought new tires. Then I "rotated" the one with the least wear into the spare position in the trunk & threw the other 3 away.
Like the Old Mechanic, I am uneasy with "the idea of an impact bearing monkey hitting my lug nuts 80 or 100 times as a low risk operation". For this and other reasons, I do my own maintenance and do not use the 2 year Toyota Care free program on our 2018 LE. I also believe that "Sure you should rotate the tires if the wear is uneven. In my old school mind THAT IS THE REASON TO ROTATE TIRES AND IT HAS BEEN THAT WAY FOR AGES".
 

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Hoopla is about negative camber in the rear on modern cars. Especially on UVs. The very moment they moved away from SA suspension in the rear, they had to tilt wheels tops inward for stability purpose. Just drive behind any modern car and look at the rear wheels. They all lean inward.
Argue all you want to, but this wears out the inner tire half faster, than the outer. Again, argue all you want to, but take rear tire off and simply look at it. Fact.
Hence, moving tires F to R same side does nothing to evenly wear R tires, as you did not change rotation direction and, accordingly, loaded the less worn out tire half.
When you do XX them, you actually do provide even wear for rear tires and they serve longer.
Again, simple fact.
Allegedly, you can't do this on directionals (why?) though I did to no detriment to driving.
But, to keep minds calm, directionals, rotate them as manufacturer recommends. Or, simply don't buy them, as you WILL end with half tire width worn out faster, to the joy of tire manufacturer.
Example is Nissan300ZX that had wider tires in the rear and narrower in the front. With a ton of negative camber for stability purposes. You can stand on your ears, you can NOT evenly wear R tires on such set up as you can't rotate them B 2 F.
All this is part of the reason they came up with cambered tires.
285223


Keep in mind that, picture above is misleading. It shows normal tire as always vertical and it is not the case. They lean in the rear and in every turn. Also, more load, more negative camber on tires. except that in case of normal tire, more load is on the tire inner edge and in camber tire, protector stays flat (sorta). As it still leans in turns. Just lesser evil.
Always keep in mind - you do not rotate tires = more $$$ into tire manufacturers sales.
 

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As stated above rotating tires is a treat to me now, before when I had my 2010 is350 I had to “flip” my tires, meaning the left side went to the right and vice versa. Luckily the g force sports from bf Goodrich are bidirectional. Without flipping the inner tire would wear extremely quick.


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Discussion Starter #11
LF to LR, RF to RR, LR to RF, RR to LF. Every 5,000 miles to avoid a buildup of road noise and vibrations and to equalize tread wear (although some vibration may be noticed for a few hundred miles after the very first 5,000 mile rotation).

Same side rotations like Toyota recommended leads to tire noise as the tires get older
Thank you for that information. But may I know the resource where you got it from? I like to read things like those to feed my curiosity. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hoopla is about negative camber in the rear on modern cars. Especially on UVs. The very moment they moved away from SA suspension in the rear, they had to tilt wheels tops inward for stability purpose. Just drive behind any modern car and look at the rear wheels. They all lean inward.
Argue all you want to, but this wears out the inner tire half faster, than the outer. Again, argue all you want to, but take rear tire off and simply look at it. Fact.
Hence, moving tires F to R same side does nothing to evenly wear R tires, as you did not change rotation direction and, accordingly, loaded the less worn out tire half.
When you do XX them, you actually do provide even wear for rear tires and they serve longer.
Again, simple fact.
Allegedly, you can't do this on directionals (why?) though I did to no detriment to driving.
But, to keep minds calm, directionals, rotate them as manufacturer recommends. Or, simply don't buy them, as you WILL end with half tire width worn out faster, to the joy of tire manufacturer.
Example is Nissan300ZX that had wider tires in the rear and narrower in the front. With a ton of negative camber for stability purposes. You can stand on your ears, you can NOT evenly wear R tires on such set up as you can't rotate them B 2 F.
All this is part of the reason they came up with cambered tires.
View attachment 285223

Keep in mind that, picture above is misleading. It shows normal tire as always vertical and it is not the case. They lean in the rear and in every turn. Also, more load, more negative camber on tires. except that in case of normal tire, more load is on the tire inner edge and in camber tire, protector stays flat (sorta). As it still leans in turns. Just lesser evil.
Always keep in mind - you do not rotate tires = more $$$ into tire manufacturers sales.
I rotated mines rears crisscrossed to the fronts, and the fronts straight back. The depth reading starting from the outside to inner side shows 6/32nds, 7/32nds, 7/32nds, 6/32nds. I pump my air to 40 PSI (COLD), the tires are rated 51 PSI MAX.

I hearsay, on radial tires you shouldn't rotate them crisscrossed. So, I am here to hear others opinion on it.
 
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