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2012 Camry Hybrid
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1,442 Posts
I buy my tires from Discount Tire as they have many stores in many cities. Although I don't know what area of the US they are in.

I would suggest the MXV4 Primacy in the H-series as it has the deeper 11/32 tread and is lower priced than the V-series which is the OEM tire for the Canadian TCH owners.

I run 40 psi in mine tested for air pressure about a hour after dusk. I over-inflate them to about 44 psi during the day then let them down to the desired air pressure. It's best to recheck your tire pressure ever couple of months.

Your tires and car will ride better at 38 psi, but i'm a mpg nut so go figure. lol

These tires are LRR tires and should have a tiny Green-X designation on the sidewalls. I have seen advertisements like michelinman web page where these tires will give you 8% increase in mpg same as the Energy tire, but the MXV4's include a quieter, smoother ride. Tires that helps pay for themselves.

http://www.michelinman.com/tire-selector/category/luxury-performance-touring/primacy-mxv4/tire-details
 

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2012 TCH LE
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5 Posts
One option is to go with a more common size: 215 60R16 is only .3 inch too small in diameter and 225 60R16 is 0.1 inch too tall. I went with the smaller size for my winter tires and had no problems (only a small speedometer error; less than 5%).

In both cases the error is less than the typical thread wear thickness. I would personnally stay away from the wider size because you would likely see a drop in mileage with the extra drag.

Yves
Thanks, Yves.

Do you think that there could ever be slightest chance that my extended warranty coverage from Toyota will ever balk at my using a non-OEM tire size?
 

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Thanks, Yves.

Do you think that there could ever be slightest chance that my extended warranty coverage from Toyota will ever balk at my using a non-OEM tire size?
Hard to say; chances are they wouldn't even notice, unless you went for whole inches in diameter difference. What you end up doing with smaller diameter tires, however, is chewing up your mileage warranty a bit faster because you will reach the maximum faster (1000 miles on a 100000 distance assuming a 1% error). It's up to you; I did find at least twice as much choice in the more popular size and they generally come out cheaper because they are in stock.

Yves
 

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Premium Member
'13 TAH & '10 FJC
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895 Posts
Thanks, Yves.

Do you think that there could ever be slightest chance that my extended warranty coverage from Toyota will ever balk at my using a non-OEM tire size?
I doubt Toyota would balk but it's certainly possible; however, I can tell you as a retired accident reconstructionist, if you are in a bad accident, this will play a part in the report and a good attorney will bring it up. Even if you are not technically at fault, I've been in court (criminal AND civil) where good attorneys put some percentage of responsibility on the other driver due to vehicle modifications, and this was always considered one of them. They will, in court, list all of the 'possible' issues with the vehicle from the 'modification' and how this would have affected your vehicle and it's handling, wear and tear, etc, etc. This is why I always stick to the OE tire size recommended by the manufacturer. I personally think changing tire size to save a few bucks is penny wise but pound foolish, especially with our 'litigious' society and the ability of an insurance company lawyer to play the game to reduce the company's liability because that is their job, to reduce the amount of any payout, be it to a 'victim' or to their own insured.

JMHO.

Robert
 

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60 Posts
Bought a lease return 2012 TCH LE. The dealership put new Kelly "Explorer Plus" tires on it. I'm a hard core Michelin guy, but I thought, "Cool -- new tires. I'll see how they do."

Well, I don't like them.

Internet research says Michelin Primacy MXV4s are the bomb for this car. So I call my local tire store (which is conveniently running a $70 Michelin rebate).

Me: "Hi. I'm looking for 205 65R/16s in Michelin Primacy MXV4."

Tire Guy: "Let me check the computer. Nope. Not able to get those. The Primacy MXV4 is being discontinued. Maybe try the Energy Saver."

Me: "What do you have in stock for my 2012 Camry Hybrid LE?"

Tire Guy: "We'll have to special order anything you want. That's a very oddball sized tire."

Me: "You mean the car that's often the best selling car in the U.S. has oddball sized tires?!!"

Recommendations?

No internet results show anyone as happy with other tire choices, nor does Consumer Reports like any others as well.
CART SUMMARY Edit cart
Tire Size: 205/65R16
Michelin Primacy MXV4 tread and side
Michelin - Primacy MXV4
Performance Touring All Season
Tire size: 205/65R16
QTY: 4 $522.84
Shipping charge applies: $29.96
$452.84
after $70 rebate
Subtotal: (4 items) $522.84
Estimated taxes and fees $21.16
Shipping and handling$29.96
YOU'RE SAVING $106.44
off standard FedEx rates!
ORDER TOTAL
(due today) $573.96

www.tirebuyer.com/tirebuyer/checkout
 

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Premium Member
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557 Posts
I doubt Toyota would balk but it's certainly possible; however, I can tell you as a retired accident reconstructionist, if you are in a bad accident, this will play a part in the report and a good attorney will bring it up. Even if you are not technically at fault, I've been in court (criminal AND civil) where good attorneys put some percentage of responsibility on the other driver due to vehicle modifications, and this was always considered one of them. They will, in court, list all of the 'possible' issues with the vehicle from the 'modification' and how this would have affected your vehicle and it's handling, wear and tear, etc, etc. This is why I always stick to the OE tire size recommended by the manufacturer. I personally think changing tire size to save a few bucks is penny wise but pound foolish, especially with our 'litigious' society and the ability of an insurance company lawyer to play the game to reduce the company's liability because that is their job, to reduce the amount of any payout, be it to a 'victim' or to their own insured.

JMHO.

Robert
Sorry to veer off topic, but have you ever seen anyone's butt in a sling post-accident because of illegal tinting?
 

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Premium Member
'13 TAH & '10 FJC
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895 Posts
Sorry to veer off topic, but have you ever seen anyone's butt in a sling post-accident because of illegal tinting?
Well, as a Mod, I'll say we are on topic, somewhat :)eek::facepalm:), which is discussing mods on vehicles, especially ones that can flag in an accident. Tires can be a big red flag for attorneys and so can tinting, especially when it exceeds State vehicle code standards (and the list could go on...lift kits, even slight performance mods, like intakes and 'chipped' engines were brought up in cases I was involved in). I especially saw them bring this up in low light/nighttime accidents, naturally addressing visibility issues for both vehicles and their drivers, no matter who had the main fault potentially assigned. With the tinting, they would ALWAYS bring up visibility, either by the tinted vehicle driver or the other driver who could not see what was going on in the tinted vehicle.

Just like the tires, they are trying to push a percentage of fault one way or another and will use the tinting 'abnormality' against you if it is your vehicle that has the excess tinting. These are MAJOR accidents, not fender benders, BTW, and even a few percentage points pushed one way or another could mean a lighter/heavier criminal sentence or thousands of dollars more or less on the civil side.

This is why I was pointing out to the OP that the hundred or two saved by buying a more available but less expensive size of tire could backfire. Heck, I saw insurance companies back out of their commitment on defending or assisting drivers (civilly, of course, as 'criminal' actions are not covered) who had modded their cars/trucks and then didn't inform the insurance carrier and the carrier would point out that the policy was null and void and point to the section in the coverage that requires the insured to notify them of 'extensive vehicle modifications'. Now, just like the IRS code and many of the terms within it, that is a 'gray' term with no real detailed meaning....which just gives the insurance company the power to decide what that term actually means on a case by case basis...and force you to pay an attorney out of your pocket to fight for your version of the definition, not theirs....

Which takes us back to the main theme response that I made in the thread, and my OPINION that, based on what I have seen in both criminal and civil courts, saving a few bucks on that different sized tire doesn't make any sense to me at all, since there is a reason why the developer of the vehicle used that size to begin with. Now, changing out the wheels and tires as a package but keeping the same total size, that is a different story; however, again, just like the tinting, if I was investigating a fatality or major injury accident, any noted mods like that go into the report and any good attorney will use it to their advantage in a court of law or a settlement hearing for the benefit of their client, be they the vehicle driver/owner, or the insurance company. ANY mod or change that changes vehicle dynamics can and will be used against you, if possible, especially if they can point to any negative as a result. On tinting, it's visibility, on the slightly different tire size it could be handling dynamics, speedometer/odometer off calibration. That chipped engine? Too much power for the vehicle or the driver's experience/ability (usually saw that with a younger driver, a lift kit and very dark tinting....and the attorney would have a field day). Saw them all...shook my head on some; however, many of them had valuable enough points that I always look at the benefit of the change versus the potential adverse side effects.

Based on this, I won't change my tire size and only tint to the max allowed by my State.

Now, that power chip and cold air intake? :rockon::D ........;)

Again, JMHO.

HTH

Robert
 

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I'm glad the MXV4s came standard with the TCH. I've been on this tire model since 2005 on my Pacifica. It's a descent all season tire that runs smoothly and quietly.

There's always the option of buying it from the dealer. My local Chrysler dealer usually would try to price match or get fairly close if I provided a competitors ad.
 

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118 Posts
JBY, my local Discount tire has plenty of MXV4 in stock. Did you try visiting your local Americas/Discount tire and seeing if they can help you? If the MXV4 is getting rare as a hen's teeth, you might want to look into getting a set of Primacy MXM4. The M4 is a very similar LRR tyre with excellent wet and dry handling.
 

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BeerSteakTxas
2012 Camry LE
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10,494 Posts
Bought a lease return 2012 TCH LE. The dealership put new Kelly "Explorer Plus" tires on it. I'm a hard core Michelin guy, but I thought, "Cool -- new tires. I'll see how they do."

Well, I don't like them.

Internet research says Michelin Primacy MXV4s are the bomb for this car. So I call my local tire store (which is conveniently running a $70 Michelin rebate).

Me: "Hi. I'm looking for 205 65R/16s in Michelin Primacy MXV4."

Tire Guy: "Let me check the computer. Nope. Not able to get those. The Primacy MXV4 is being discontinued. Maybe try the Energy Saver."

Me: "What do you have in stock for my 2012 Camry Hybrid LE?"

Tire Guy: "We'll have to special order anything you want. That's a very oddball sized tire."

Me: "You mean the car that's often the best selling car in the U.S. has oddball sized tires?!!"

Recommendations?

No internet results show anyone as happy with other tire choices, nor does Consumer Reports like any others as well.
I have Primacy on one camry and Energy Savers on another and no matter what ppl say I'd stay behind my opinion; the Energy Savers are better tires than the Primacys. Both tires are quiet, but the Energy Saver offers notisably better better wet and dry grip and better snow/ice traction. Seems to me it also wears better.
Go for Energy Saver or Pirelli P7 plus Cinturato.
 

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2007 TCH owner
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341 Posts
Long term review - Hankook Optimo H727

I bought this tire to replace my Yokohama Avid TRZ (oem) tires which are really bad in snow in Kansas City. I was happy with the Hankook for 2 winters since it provides the traction I needed. Now at close to 40k miles, it started to be noisy on the road. On the other hand while it's becoming noisy my MPG is going up at 40mpg avg (city and highway driving 50/50)

Guess I might be looking for new tires soon...

I know people would recommend Michelin, Goodyear but I'm looking for all seasons with good snow traction and the price range of Hankook. Low rolling resistance tire is a "No" for me (honestly you could still get good mileage without that)
 

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2008 TCH
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695 Posts
I bought this tire to replace my Yokohama Avid TRZ (oem) tires which are really bad in snow in Kansas City. I was happy with the Hankook for 2 winters since it provides the traction I needed. Now at close to 40k miles, it started to be noisy on the road. On the other hand while it's becoming noisy my MPG is going up at 40mpg avg (city and highway driving 50/50)

Guess I might be looking for new tires soon...

I know people would recommend Michelin, Goodyear but I'm looking for all seasons with good snow traction and the price range of Hankook. Low rolling resistance tire is a "No" for me (honestly you could still get good mileage without that)
Good info. Thanks for sharing. I had a set of Hankook Optimo's on ours that replaced the OEM Michelins. They were great and went over 86,000 miles before needing replacement. I remember our Hankook's becoming noisy after about 65,000 miles. I also remember the jump in fuel economy.

We went with Yokohama YK 580's after the Hankooks. We have got about 30,000 miles on them now and they were right at $600 out the door. They are a great tire in the rain and track better than both the Michelins and the Hankooks. However on certain surfaces the noise can be really annoying. I'm a little worried on how they will sound after 60,000 miles. It is for this reason ONLY that I would not recommend them. I think that overall the Hankooks were the best tires we have had for this car so far.

The problem with buying tires is that you never know how good they are until you spend a lot of time with them. I now know that I will never go back to the Michelins or this particular Yokohama.

FWIW... OEM Michelins went 72,000 miles, Hankooks went 87,000 miles and the Yoko's are just over 30,000 miles and have tons of tread left. They barely look worn at all.
 

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2012 Camry Hybrid
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1,442 Posts
Michelin has a new tire out called the Premier A/S tire. This tire looks to be a little better than their popular Primacy MXV4 tire. This tire is designed for good traction, better stopping and still retains high mpg. The tread is cut so the tire will still have like new traction even when the tread gets thin. You can check the info below if you interested.

http://www.michelinman.com/tire-selector/name/premier-a-s-tires?Wt.mc_id=Paid%2520Search;Google;michlen%20man&WT.srch=1&mkwid=s8ULx5BTv&gclid=CJf__OjO5L4CFUOSfgod754Aeg

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Michelin&tireModel=Premier+A%2FS
 

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14TAH Touring 10 TundraDC
2014 TAH Touring
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393 Posts
Interesting tire, does not look like it comes in the Original Equipment Size:215/55-17
 
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