Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would a 205 50 17 tire have noticeable better gas mileage over 215 45 17? Would a 93v be a noticeable stiffer ride over a 87v tire of 215 45 17 or 205 50 17?
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
20,330 Posts
Would a 205 50 17 tire have noticeable better gas mileage over 215 45 17? Would a 93v be a noticeable stiffer ride over a 87v tire of 215 45 17 or 205 50 17?
If you are comparing the same tire in each size than the 205/50R17 will give you a little better MPG and the speedometer will be more accurate. The ride might be close to the same if the 215/45R17 has a softer sidewall but it's also a shorter sidewall so it's probably a similar ride. If you want better MPG get the 205/50R17 in an LRR tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,508 Posts
"Energy Saver" tires typically have better gas mileage, but may not ride as comfortably or as smooth as some other tires.

The biggest determination of gas mileage in tires is usually the PSI. Check the inflation frequently, and fill a couple of PSI more than recommended on the sticker in the drivers side door jamb. But do not fill to the max PSI listed on the tire itself. Always measure tire pressure when the tire is "cold" (not driven for 4 or more hours).

The 205 50 17 is 1.8% larger diameter than the 215 45 17, so it will get slightly better gas mileage. I would use the OEM tire size, or one that has about the same diameter (check a tire retailer website for compatible options, or use a tire calculator on the Internet). If 205 50 17 is OEM, then 215 45 17 is a little small, and a different size should have been chosen if a wider and lower profile tire is desired, that would have resulted in a similar overall diameter.

Regarding 93V vs 87V, the V is the speed rating, and the "number" is the load handling capacity. The mileage difference between the two would depend on the specific characteristics of the tires you are talking about, and it hard to generalize about mileage based solely on the load handling capacity.
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
20,330 Posts
"Energy Saver" tires typically have better gas mileage, but may not ride as comfortably or as smooth as some other tires.

The biggest determination of gas mileage in tires is usually the PSI. Check the inflation frequently, and fill a couple of PSI more than recommended on the sticker in the drivers side door jamb. But do not fill to the max PSI listed on the tire itself. Always measure tire pressure when the tire is "cold" (not driven for 4 or more hours).

The 205 50 17 is 1.8% larger diameter than the 215 45 17, so it will get slightly better gas mileage. I would use the OEM tire size, or one that has about the same diameter (check a tire retailer website for compatible options, or use a tire calculator on the Internet). If 205 50 17 is OEM, then 215 45 17 is a little small, and a different size should have been chosen if a wider and lower profile tire is desired, that would have resulted in a similar overall diameter.

Regarding 93V vs 87V, the V is the speed rating, and the "number" is the load handling capacity. The mileage difference between the two would depend on the specific characteristics of the tires you are talking about, and it hard to generalize about mileage based solely on the load handling capacity.
You are missing a lot of facts here. Tire construction and tread compound will have the biggest effect on ride quality. Air pressure can be adjusted on any tire where you can't simply adjust the tire construction like you can the PSI.

Corollas use many different tire sizes but you need to dig a little deeper to find the truth.

195/65R15 25.0" diameter
205/55R16. 24.9" diameter
215/45R17 24.6" - too small

Other options that are excellent choices.

195/60R16 25.2"
225/50R16. 25.0"
205/50R17 25.1"
225/45R17 25.0"
225/40R18 25.0"

I'm not sure why Toyota ever used the 215/45R17. They switched to the proper size on the 11th Gen Corolla iM hatchback with the 225/45R17. Using the 205/50R17 or 225/45R17 are much better choices as they can get a little more sidewall height, protect the wheel better and correct the speedometer error that using the 215/45R17 size can cause.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,508 Posts
You are missing a lot of facts here. Tire construction and tread compound will have the biggest effect on ride quality.
Yes, "Energy Saver" tires have a tire construction and tread compound that yield better gas mileage. That seems obvious.

Air pressure can be adjusted on any tire where you can't simply adjust the tire construction like you can the PSI.
Yes, obviously air pressure can be adjusted on any tire. When did I say or imply that tire construction can be "adjusted" unless you replace the tire?

As far as the other information about wheel and tire size combinations, that is useful information, but I was assuming that someone who was keenly interested in saving money with tires that got better fuel mileage, is not likely to be in the mood to spring for a set of 4 new wheels (with different wheel sizes than the 17 which they already have). That was my assumption, anyway.
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
20,330 Posts
Yes, "Energy Saver" tires have a tire construction and tread compound that yield better gas mileage. That seems obvious.

Yes, obviously air pressure can be adjusted on any tire. When did I say or imply that tire construction can be "adjusted" unless you replace the tire?

As far as the other information about wheel and tire size combinations, that is useful information, but I was assuming that someone who was keenly interested in saving money with tires that got better fuel mileage, is not likely to be in the mood to spring for a set of 4 new wheels (with different wheel sizes than the 17 which they already have). That was my assumption, anyway.
Air pressure and tire construction both have a big influence on ride and handling. I was pointing out that while air pressure can be adjusted and make a difference in ride the tire construction has more to do with it than air pressure does since that can be adjusted. HArd to type what I'm thinking and make it clear at times. ;)

I was pointing out that if he wants to stay with the OEM 17" size than the 205/50R17 is the best choice for MPG while the 225/45R17 is the best choice for performance. The OEM size is the worst choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,508 Posts
Air pressure and tire construction both have a big influence on ride and handling. I was pointing out that while air pressure can be adjusted and make a difference in ride the tire construction has more to do with it than air pressure does since that can be adjusted. HArd to type what I'm thinking and make it clear at times.
The primary subject was fuel economy. Both PSI and tire construction influence fuel economy.

According to the federal government:
  • Although the primary goal of TPMS is to reduce underinflation in order to make vehicles safer to operate, a further benefit of reduced underinflation is improved fuel economy.

  • On average, fuel economy is expected to increase by 0.308 percent for every 1-percent increase in average tire pressure. [So if the recommended pressure was 35 PSI, running at 32 PSI would decrease MPG from 30 MPG to about 29.2 MPG (a 2.7% decrease).]
(starting on page 28)
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
20,330 Posts
The primary subject was fuel economy. Both PSI and tire construction influence fuel economy.

According to the federal government:
  • Although the primary goal of TPMS is to reduce underinflation in order to make vehicles safer to operate, a further benefit of reduced underinflation is improved fuel economy.

  • On average, fuel economy is expected to increase by 0.308 percent for every 1-percent increase in average tire pressure. [So if the recommended pressure was 35 PSI, running at 32 PSI would decrease MPG from 30 MPG to about 29.2 MPG (a 2.7% decrease).]
(starting on page 28)
That is true. While PSi can be adjusted it's more critical to pick the best tire if looking for MPG. The best tire for achieving MPG is the Michelin Energy Saver. On the Prius forums, they have tested a lot of different tires. The Prius is very sensitive to different tires and the affect they have on MPG. This is why I pointed him to the 205/50R17. It's best for MPG, ride and speedometer accuracy. :D
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top