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'00 Camry V6 (1MZ-FE)
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To those who have a 07 V6 models, do you feel the torque steer on your cars? I did take a test drive, but it was very short, and I didn't feel any.

But I didn't feel any when I took a test drive on my 2000 Camry V6 either, however, every now and then, I do get the torque steer when I really floor it.

Any 07 V6 owners here?
 

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Maven
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If you stomp on it from a red light be prepared to hang on and keep it pulled to the center because, yes, it is gong to try to put you in the next lane of traffic. You will also get about 12 mpg doing this on a regular basis.
 

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'00 Camry V6 (1MZ-FE)
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
gdanaher said:
If you stomp on it from a red light be prepared to hang on and keep it pulled to the center because, yes, it is gong to try to put you in the next lane of traffic. You will also get about 12 mpg doing this on a regular basis.
I don't want to open another thread, so I may as well just ask here. Besides a few minor appearance differences, are there any differences between the SE V6 and the LE V6?
 

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451 Posts
NewRacer said:
Okay I get the wheel spin.

But on a stright line, say a stop light, when you floor it, does the steering wheel pull left and right?
Yup, if it'll spin a wheel, it'll pull the car... Normal accelleration and you will not notice any torque steer, get on it a bit and you'll feel it. Be prepared, it can be pretty strong especially if you kick down a gear or 3 at a realtively slow speed, say under 45MPH.

FWIW - on a couple of occasions I found the torque steer works to an advantage, especially while cornering... I didn't do it often, but a couple of times I found a sweet-spot where a little understeer and torque steer combined to net a pretty nice hook.
 

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NewRacer said:
I don't want to open another thread, so I may as well just ask here. Besides a few minor appearance differences, are there any differences between the SE V6 and the LE V6?
There are some structural, suspension and package combination differences... The most obvious differences are the body kit and different guage package and 17" wheels.
 

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Premium Member
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2,262 Posts
west467 said:
Yes, I get torque steer, isn't it Great!!
What should someone expect from 268 HP
in the front?

Like everyone else said; HOLD ON!!:)
You guys must be used to cars with no ass or only driven RWD. This is probably the least torque steer I ahve felt given the power on a FWD. You would be hard pressed to get such little toque steer from an Accord V6 or Sonata. I was amazed how well mannered it was at WOT from a stop compared to other cars I have driven.
 

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Gen 6 Camry
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yes, there is torque steer present when you stomp on the gas. I wonder if its the same for people that has TRD springs. I had an integra before and it had a lot of torque steer until i lowered the car with stiffer springs and shocks.
 

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it is what it is
07 Camry SE
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2,294 Posts
jofrad said:
yes, there is torque steer present when you stomp on the gas. I wonder if its the same for people that has TRD springs. I had an integra before and it had a lot of torque steer until i lowered the car with stiffer springs and shocks.
Even with TRD springs you get torque steer.
 

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Premium Member
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astrokat said:
I noticed that as well. My car is 268 miles on it and i was worried I jacked up the aligment. I am glad all is normal.:lol:
It seems like maybe some folks don't understand what torque steer is. Basically it is the torque of the power getting to the wheels causing the front wheels to pull to the side, not hop or spin.
 

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NewRacer said:
I don't want to open another thread, so I may as well just ask here. Besides a few minor appearance differences, are there any differences between the SE V6 and the LE V6?
A v-brace behind the rear passenger seats (shared with the XLE), as well as underbody aerodynamic pieces (actual aero pieces, not the lip kit). Shocks with higher dampening rates, stiffer springs, and a thicker rear sway bar. The steering ratio and feel are also different. Mechanically, the gear ratios, engine components, ECU tuning, etc are all the same. It also has a different gauge cluster, as someone already pointed out. Its loses the optitron gauges in favor for a more traditional back-lit setup. But still quite nice, I enjoy it.
 

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SEcond Rate Products
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406 Posts
The torque steer in my car is virtually undetectable...

the only thing that it does that could be in the least bit classified as torque steer would be when cornering with large throttle openings... which basically none of you normal folk would (or should) be doing anyway.

(Used to race FWD cars so trust me, this car's torque steer is negligable.)

Now mine has VSC/TRAC but i doubt that comes in to play.

It's just a well-thought-out (in terms of geometry, all reliability/flare issues aside) drivetrain that minimizes torque steer.

Any FWD (or even AWD under the right conditions) car that has un-equal-length half shafts (drive shafts, propeller shafts, the tube thingies that turn the wheels, whatever you wanna call them) is going to have torque steer to the side with the shortest shaft.

This car's shafts are equal length... viola, no torque steer.
 

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repocop said:
The torque steer in my car is virtually undetectable...

the only thing that it does that could be in the least bit classified as torque steer would be when cornering with large throttle openings... which basically none of you normal folk would (or should) be doing anyway.

(Used to race FWD cars so trust me, this car's torque steer is negligable.)

Now mine has VSC/TRAC but i doubt that comes in to play.

It's just a well-thought-out (in terms of geometry, all reliability/flare issues aside) drivetrain that minimizes torque steer.

Any FWD (or even AWD under the right conditions) car that has un-equal-length half shafts (drive shafts, propeller shafts, the tube thingies that turn the wheels, whatever you wanna call them) is going to have torque steer to the side with the shortest shaft.

This car's shafts are equal length... viola, no torque steer.
Some info..

"Even equal-length driveshafts aren't perfect. The linkages and bearings in the intermediate shaft, and the shaft itself, still have torque-output delays.

Other causes of torque steer can't be helped, which is why torque steer can never be totally cured. It goes back to the problem of having the front wheels do all the work. Any time the tire contact patches are unequal, you'll get torque steer. Under cornering, for instance, one wheel has more weight transferred to it and—depending on suspension and steering geometry—might have a differently shaped contact patch. Another time this happens is when each tire has varying grip, as in wet or wintry conditions." <<<--- Back to my statement, if it'll spin, it'll steer.

What causes it???

"In a front-wheel-drive car, engine power is applied to wheels that also want to turn, unlike in a rear-wheeldrive car in which these two tasks are separate. When you turn the steering wheel, the wheels pivot about the appropriately named steering axis. Power is applied pretty much equally over the tire's contact patch (the part that's touching the road), which we'll approximate to a single force at the center of the patch. Now, if you extend the steering axis to the ground, it will be offset from the center of the contact patch. In case you were wondering, yes, this is called the steering offset.

The fundamental reason for torque steer is that the power applied at the contact patch wants to turn the wheel around the steering axis, which, you'll remember from the last sentence, is offset. If you compare it to a door, the steering axis is the hinge, and the center of the contact patch is where you push to swing the door open, hence the offset.

Most cars, of course, have two front wheels, so the forces on each wheel should counteract each other. But if the forces on each wheel are different, or if a tire's contact patch changes, that imbalance will cause one tire to twist more than the other, and that's when you get torque steer."
 

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SEcond Rate Products
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406 Posts
ok. thanks for the long-winded copy and paste...what were you trying to accomplish exactly?

the overwhelming majority of straight-line dry-pavement torque steer in FWD cars is caused by poor transaxle/half shaft design.

of course you can't make a fwd drivetrain steer free, but the camry i drive every day is pretty damn close.


i've owned many FWD and AWD vehicles, as well as driven them in compettition, i've experienced everything from really horrendous torque steer (RSX Type-S) to ridiculous torque steer + fishtailing events (Mitsu VR4) so I've got a bit of a base to sample from.

one of the worst torque steering cars we've owned, and some might find this surprising, others will not be surprised, was actually a 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora. which is why i chuckle every time someone talks about one of those GM cars with the big V8's in a FWD config.. lol
 

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ASE Master Technician
2006 Lexus GS430
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2,396 Posts
The worst torque steer i have ever experienced was in my 94 Taurus SHO 5-Speed
 
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