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I am located in Canada and am looking at a used Sequoia from the northern US. I would like to know more about the difference in towing capacity ratings from Canada vs US.

According to the 2010 Sequoia the towing capacity is approx 7000lbs for a US model. Here in Canada the specification for towing capacity is 9000lbs.

Why a difference?

Thank you
 

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::::Taken from Wikipedia:::::

Seating arrangements are for seven or eight passengers, eight for SR5 and Limited models and seven for Platinum models. Power folding 60/40 split third row seats are available on the Platinum. The Sequoia has a maximum towing capacity of 10,000 lbs (4,536 kg) with the 5.7-liter V8 in 2WD SR5 form or 9,600 lbs in the 4WD SR5 trim. Other versions tow considerably less, such as the 5.7-liter 4WD Platinum, which can tow 8,800 lbs (3,991 kg). The lowest towing capacity for the Sequioa is the 4.6-liter 4WD SR5, which tows 7,000 lbs (3,175 kg) For complete trailer & weight capacities, see Toyota’s website.[4]
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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I think that's a misprint. The towing capacities should be pretty much the same. The specs I have from the dealership here say up to 10,000 pounds capacity, depending on the model/engine.
 

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Thank you again for the fast reply.
I guess it is like most say: you can not believe what you read.

I must assume you are very knowledgeable when it comes to Toyota's. How is your experience with the Sequoia? I have never owned a Toyota before but am leaning closer and closer!
 

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Thank you again for the fast reply.
I guess it is like most say: you can not believe what you read.

I must assume you are very knowledgeable when it comes to Toyota's. How is your experience with the Sequoia? I have never owned a Toyota before but am leaning closer and closer!
You're very welcome! :D
I work at a Toyota dealership in the sales department, but I'm not a salesperson :lol: Kind of a weird position. But anyway, I do know a lot about the features and specs about Toyotas, Sequoias included. I personally don't and haven't owned one, but talking with the many customers that come into the dealership, I would say 95% are happy with it and they do run....forever.
 

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I am located in Canada and am looking at a used Sequoia from the northern US. I would like to know more about the difference in towing capacity ratings from Canada vs US.

According to the 2010 Sequoia the towing capacity is approx 7000lbs for a US model. Here in Canada the specification for towing capacity is 9000lbs.

Why a difference?

Thank you
The reason the tow ratings are different in the U.S. and Canada is that Toyota in the states is using the new SAE J2807 tow ratings which are being standardized across many different vehicle manufacturers. These ratings give a more realistic number as to what the vehicle can actually tow. For some reason, Toyota Canada has yet to adopt this standard and continues to publish the older rating. That being said, using the older rating, you should never tow more than 85 percent of what the maximum rating states. For instance, my 2011 Sequoia Limited is rated at 9,100 lbs. but should never tow more than 7,735 lbs. which brings it much closer to the ratings stated by Toyota in the States.
 

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The only towing I've done with mine was to pull our Suzuki XL-7 home from a dealer service (the Suzuki is rigged to two behind a motorhome). So I was way under the weight rating and carrying almost none of the weight on the tongue... And that went well. I got better gas mileage towing the Suzuki with the Sequoia than I get driving the Suzuki.

Anyway, I've seen posts from others who are trying to tow a much higher percentage of the Sequoia's tow rating. If you are going to tow anything substantial behind a Sequoia, you're going to probably be looking at some suspension modifications like airbags. Just keep in mind that you can't drop 8000 pounds on the factory hitch with a straight stock Sequoia.
 

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I have seen Sequoias pull horse trailers in my area and do so rather well. Obviously not a goosneck hitch, but they aren't exactly hauling an empty trailer, either. I saw one pull a 3 horse bumper pull slant, with 3 horses and all the gear, and it didn't even break a sweat, so to speak.
 

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I guess I'm the one that disagrees about towing with the sequoia. I have an 08 4x4 limited, 5.7 and the towing package. The power is great, but the 6 spd tranny was continually "huntin"g even in tow haul mode and the suspension was way to soft. I was pulling a 5x10 flatbed with a riding mower, so about 2000lbs on flat ground between 55-60mpg. I was seriously disappointed and surprised. My 05 Expedition was much better even with the smaller engine.

Other than that, I love the Sequoia
 

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I guess I'm the one that disagrees about towing with the sequoia. I have an 08 4x4 limited, 5.7 and the towing package. The power is great, but the 6 spd tranny was continually "huntin"g even in tow haul mode and the suspension was way to soft. I was pulling a 5x10 flatbed with a riding mower, so about 2000lbs on flat ground between 55-60mpg. I was seriously disappointed and surprised. My 05 Expedition was much better even with the smaller engine.

Other than that, I love the Sequoia

I don't know if you were doing this or not but, if not, give this a try. In addition to using the Tow/Haul mode take you transmission out of drive and use it in S5 mode. This allows the transmission to only use gears one through five and might eliminate the "hunting" issues. This is what Toyota says to use in my 2011 manual. As for the suspension, some airbags in the rear springs might help.
 

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I did try taking the truck out of overdrive, but there was still a fair amount of "hunting". It just felt like the truck was always a gear off at roadspeed. Going up through the gears was no issue and the brakes were solid, at least with the small trailer.

It wasn't sag, it was just a feeling of not being rock solid--best way I can describe it. As far as airbags, I am not a believer in airbags. They don't increase the capacity, but rather mask the symptoms of being overloaded/over capacity, which can lead to problems in a hurry.

I also think that Toyota is a bit misleading on the tow capacities. The brochure at a dealership clearly states up to 9100 when properly equipped and references the tow package which seems to imply that it makes it tow ready, but, if you read the manual closely, Toyota states that the factory hitch is only rated for 6k, anything over 5k needs a weight distributing hitch. Some of that might be for legal/liability issues, butmMy other SUV's never had this type of confusion.

Make sure you read the manual carefully if you are planning on towing.
 

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I did try taking the truck out of overdrive, but there was still a fair amount of "hunting". It just felt like the truck was always a gear off at roadspeed. Going up through the gears was no issue and the brakes were solid, at least with the small trailer.

It wasn't sag, it was just a feeling of not being rock solid--best way I can describe it. As far as airbags, I am not a believer in airbags. They don't increase the capacity, but rather mask the symptoms of being overloaded/over capacity, which can lead to problems in a hurry.

I also think that Toyota is a bit misleading on the tow capacities. The brochure at a dealership clearly states up to 9100 when properly equipped and references the tow package which seems to imply that it makes it tow ready, but, if you read the manual closely, Toyota states that the factory hitch is only rated for 6k, anything over 5k needs a weight distributing hitch. Some of that might be for legal/liability issues, butmMy other SUV's never had this type of confusion.

Make sure you read the manual carefully if you are planning on towing.
Strange that shifting out of overdrive didn't help. I've talked to many that have said their towing experience has been flawless.

As for the airbags, I didn't mean to suggest they would increase the capacity of the truck. You're quite right – they won't and people who believe they will get into trouble fast. They also don't provide a predictable ride like a tuned suspension system would. On the up side, they do provide a more level towing platform and firmer ride in the back as well as taking a bit of strain of the rear suspension. They will also help a bit with side to side lean when cornering. Of course, all this assumes the owner/driver has the vehicle properly equipped for what they are towing with no overloading and driving in such a manner to not overtax the vehicle. In my experience, most problems occur through human error, such as overloading, not understanding what the vehicle is actually capable of and driving too fast for road/load conditions.

You are quite right about the stated towing capacity as well. More marketing than actual towing capacity. With that in mind, I never tow more than 85 percent of the stated capacity. Manufacturer's are far to eager to outdo each other in the numbers game and many owners don't do enough research beyond what the sales person says. Even so, the Sequoia is quite capable of towing heavy loads with ease and in a safe manner. By heavy, I mean up to about 7,500 lbs. Beyond that I really wouldn't feel comfortable and would probably move up to a three-quarter or one ton truck. My trailer only weighs in at 6,000 lbs. fully loaded. Easily pulled by the Sequoia with the proper hitch and common sense driving.
 

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what exactly is the reason behind releasing the same model with different towing in different countries ? i mean i just don't get the concept behind it.
The vehicles are physically the same and capable of pulling the same weight. The only difference is in the standard of testing to determine how much that weight is. In the U.S., Toyota has adopted the new standards before they become mandatory. In Canada, those standards have yet to be adopted. I remember reading an article on the subject that stated those standards would become mandatory across all vehicle manufacturers sometime in the next few years. I'm sure you'll see the Canadian and U.S. number match sometime before that deadline comes into effect.
 
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