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TN の がしょう
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It only has a 13.2 gal. tank? The mileage on this sucker would be horrible for its size and it requires premium....hmmm. OH well.
 

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Vivir el momento
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Discussion Starter #263
It only has a 13.2 gal. tank? The mileage on this sucker would be horrible for its size and it requires premium....hmmm. OH well.
The old AE86 had the same 50L fuel capacity. Fuel economy and fuel range have yet to be determined. The premium requirement is a result of the engines high compression ratio.
 

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TN の がしょう
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^ That's reasonable because of the era the AE86 was from. Back then gas tanks were small for cars. I was hoping it would be at least 14 or 15 gal. Then again...that would cause more unbalance of the car.

I'm guessing, since it's a flat-4 and a engine engineered by Subaru, the mpg would probably hover between 30-25 hwy, 22-24 city.
 

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TN の がしょう
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^ It looks like it was taken from a gameplay of Gran Turismo 5.
 

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^ That's reasonable because of the era the AE86 was from. Back then gas tanks were small for cars. I was hoping it would be at least 14 or 15 gal. Then again...that would cause more unbalance of the car.

I'm guessing, since it's a flat-4 and a engine engineered by Subaru, the mpg would probably hover between 30-25 hwy, 22-24 city.
Its possible that it could be better than that particularly the highway portion. The new Impreza according to the EPA does 25 city and 34 highway(this is the 5-speed manual, the CVT is even better) which is ridiculously close to the 2011 Corolla's numbers. Add that the BRZ will have a lower drag coefficient number, less weight than the Impreza and no AWD to weaken its fuel economy numbers, and a 6-speed to strengthen its highway economy numbers.

The only problem my Impreza has on fuel economy is that lack of a 6th gear since my 5th gear is relatively short. This makes my highway fuel economy essentially rubbish to the point my Cressida(when working properly) and my dad's Avalon could beat with ease.
 

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It makes a Scirocco seem synthetic, an RCZ anaesthetised, a 3-series Coupé over-complicated. This is a pure driving device like an Elise or an MX-5 with sharpened sinews. This is how a proper sporting coupé should be. Toyota intended it to embody elements of the 1960s 2000GT and the 1980s rear-drive Corolla Twin-Cam (AE86), and it does.
Via possibly the best electric steering system we've yet encountered, with much more subtle sensitivity than the new 911's system and a more mechnically-connected feel about the centre, you can exploit a balance perfectly tunable with the tiniest throttle inputs.

What a review. Easy to read and full of common sense and objective qualities. Chris Harris is one of the most rational and objective car journalist I have ever seen who truly appreciates cars without prejudice against a particular brand.

I love Evo. They always absolutely adore the LFA and gave it the proper due respect it deserves. Gave it the "best engine of the year" beating the 458 Italia, SLS AMG, GT2 RS, GT3 RS etc. placed LFA no. 3rd in the "best cars of the year" and called LFA the "best car we have ever driven on Nurburgring" and declared it the winner in a comparo with Ferrari 599 GTO.
 

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Newbie One Kanobi
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What a review. Easy to read and full of common sense and objective qualities. Chris Harris is one of the most rational and objective car journalist I have ever seen who truly appreciates cars without prejudice against a particular brand.

I love Evo. They always absolutely adore the LFA and gave it the proper due respect it deserves. Gave it the "best engine of the year" beating the 458 Italia, SLS AMG, GT2 RS, GT3 RS etc. placed LFA no. 3rd in the "best cars of the year" and called LFA the "best car we have ever driven on Nurburgring" and declared it the winner in a comparo with Ferrari 599 GTO.
^^ I agree. Chris Harris is a very good reviewer. he reviews for the car nut and not the fanboi's. But yeah, good reviews.
 

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Evo also reviewed the Subaru BRZ. Surprise! surprise! Now one more reason (aside from the silly Scion branding dropping the ball) to get the Subaru is that it has a sportier suspension than the Toyota GT-86

Driven: Subaru BRZ

Rating:


Hot on the heels of the new Toyota GT 86, we've driven its sister car, the Subaru BRZ. Can a rear-wheel drive coupe really be a true Subaru?

By Mike Duff
December 2011


What is it?

Subaru’s all-new sports coupe, driven for the first time on a Japanese test track. The BRZ is the sister car to the Toyota GT 86 that we’ve just tested, with both cars being differentiated by barely more than badging, wheels and the shape of their radiator grilles.

It’s set to go on sale in the UK in June next year, and although prices haven’t been confirmed, it’s anticipated to cost somewhere between £25K and £28K.



Technical highlights?

The Subaru is mechanically (almost) identical to the Toyota – the only difference of note between the two cars is that the BRZ gets marginally stiffer suspension settings. But, although the two brands are officially happy to split the corporate acclaim, it’s worth nothing that the project was almost entirely engineered by Subaru, and both cars will be produced in its factory.

The creation of a new lightweight sportscar, powered by an all-new boxer engine, is an impressive achievement for a company of Subaru’s relatively modest size. And although there are some links between the BRZ/ GT 86 and the next Subaru Impreza, including shared bit of floorpan, the relationship is a distant one. Somewhat amazingly, the new ‘FA20’ 2-litre boxer engine in the BRZ is almost entirely unrelated to naturally aspirated boxer engines that will power the next Impreza. The coupe’s motor is more compact, lower and lighter – sitting 240mm further back in the chassis.

Suspension has been derived from the Impreza, but cleverly reworked with the lower arms of the front McPherson struts turned back-to-front to make the minimal front overhang possible. Twin wishbones at the back are pure Impreza, but the BRZ gets a larger differential to cater for the fact it's rear-drive only.

One of the engineering team’s core aims was to give the lowest possible centre of gravity – just 460mm. Toyota likes to point out that this is lower than the C-of-G of a Porsche Boxster, Subaru preferred to tell us that the figure was better than that of 458 Italia. Clever weight saving includes the use of high-strength in the roof and upper structure of the car, to reduce mass further, and even the use of thinner glass for windscreen and side windows.

What’s it like to drive?

Our too-brief drive, on Subaru’s smooth (and sodden) test track was too short to deliver any kind of definitive verdict – not least as Subaru unsportingly sent the cars out with chaperones in the passenger seat to prevent any deactivation of the stability control system.

But with that read into the record, first impressions are good – very good. The BRZ doesn’t feel particularly rapid in a straight line – the naturally aspirated motor needs to be thrashed to deliver its best, with peak power coming at a heady 7000rpm. Taken all the way to the redline the BRZ should be capable of dispatching 0-60mph in just under second seconds (I guessed 6.7 and my chaperone just smiled), but it feels like the gearing has been very carefully chosen for the benchmark – the manual transmission (just) allows 100km/h in second gear. Actually getting a sub-7 0-60 would mean interfacing with the rev limiter a couple of tenths afterwards.

But it’s corners that make the BRZ special – even wet ones – with a beautifully poised chassis that talks to the driver through exceptionally communicative electric power steering. Take too much speed into a corner and there’s well-flagged understeer, but judge your entry speed right and then use the immediately reactive throttle to bring the car to the point where the rear tyres are just running out of grip and it’s clear that this is a car that really wants to play. The ‘sport’ setting for the stability control - which I was allowed to activate - even allows a modest slip angle before the yellow light starts flashing and everything gets reined in.

The automatic option, anticipated to be a minority of sales in the UK, is less impressive with a slight delay in response, even when control is taken through the paddles behind the steering wheel. It’s a conventional torque-converter auto, and even trick electronics can’t give it reactions to match a DSG.



How does it compare?

It’s going to be down to price – and the strong value of the Yen means that Subaru’s UK distributors are unable to confirm what the car will actually cost when it gets here next summer. Reckon on around £25,000 for the basic version and between £28,000 to £30,000 for the higher spec model. But on first impressions, the BRZ feels more than capable of taking the fight to rivals like the Audi TT, BMW 1-Coupe and even – power deficit withstanding – the Porsche Cayman.

Versus the Toyota, though? That’s a tricky one – design is always subjective, but we reckon the GT 86 looks slightly better. But with Subaru UK anticipating selling around 1000 cars a year – versus 4000 for the Toyota – the BRZ is always going to be a more exclusive option.

Anything else I need to know?

The base model (which we didn't drive) sounds like it might be a bit of a star – it will come with 16 inch wheels in place of the 17s on our test car, which may well work better on British roads. Its lack of toys and gizmos (Subaru is even threatening to give it black door handles in place of body-coloured ones) could suit the minimalist nature of the car.

evo Rating
Beautiful chassis balance, spot-on electric power steering
Needs to be revved to deliver, not as good looking as GT 86

http://www.evo.co.uk/carreviews/evocarreviews/276025/driven_subaru_brz.html
 

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yeah, Scion is tanking here so obviously they hope with the FR-S and the iQ they hope to get more foot traffic.
The problem with this though is that Scion dealers are part of the Toyota dealership. It wouldn't matter if it had a Scion or Toyota badge but I bet that more foot traffic would come if it had a Toyota badge. :D
 

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TN の がしょう
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OH what? Subaru put their electric power steering in theirs? I hope at least Scion would just keep the traditional power steering. I heard the electric power steering is a bit light, if not, "floaty" I don't want a sports car with 'floaty' steering feel. That's what my camry is for.
 

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Vivir el momento
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Discussion Starter #278
OH what? Subaru put their electric power steering in theirs? I hope at least Scion would just keep the traditional power steering. I heard the electric power steering is a bit light, if not, "floaty" I don't want a sports car with 'floaty' steering feel. That's what my camry is for.
All versions of the car use EPS. The Lexus LFA uses a similar type of column mounted EPS system. So does the IS-F. Even the new 991 Porsche 911 uses EPS instead of the conventional hydraulic system. It's tuned for feedback and weight, like a proper sports car should have.

Don't worry it won't feel nor drive like your Camry that's for sure. :lol:
 

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OH what? Subaru put their electric power steering in theirs? I hope at least Scion would just keep the traditional power steering. I heard the electric power steering is a bit light, if not, "floaty" I don't want a sports car with 'floaty' steering feel. That's what my camry is for.
The hydraulic power steering system is on the way out. As mentioned the 911 uses EPS, the Mustang has EPS mostly as an assist and even the MX-5 has electric power steering. How they're tuned can ultimately determine how good...or bad they are. The 2009 Corolla's first stint with EPS for me was one of the worst as far as steering feel was concerned...apparently there was a recall for these cars and the later 2010s I drove weren't this bad. The 2011-2012 Hyundai Sonata that got rave reviews, I drive a lot of these and they were particularly tuned for ease of use...so it was very easy to drive but steering feel was left out as well. The 2011-2012 Mustang GTs I drove, those were much much more lively and better than many new mainstream cars with hydraulic steering and I was less pessimistic about EPS afterwards. Heck, I initially thought it was hydraulic.

The only thing I possibly worry about EPS on a sports car now is that how good the tuning was. If it can match or possibly beat a good hydraulic steering unit then it'll be brilliant. Due to how much effort was put into how this car feels, I'm not going to worry. With a ordinary car, I'm a bit more worried since I've found only Mazda and Ford have put the most effort into tuning their EPS units properly, the rest...not so much where it seems they want to go to driver-less cars and encourage drivers to think that's a good idea.
 
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