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Don't know about BMW or C-HR but from what came with my Corolla
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I'll keep this Toyota relevant. The only thing mentioned in the maintenance schedule is to check the trans for any leaks. That's it. From your posted schedule, I find it dubious that they list the transmission fluid/oil as an inspect item. In my opinion, if the fluid has oddities in it such as burnt smell, then it's already too late to do anything about it.

I mentioned to my service adviser at my dealership as to how much they charge to change the filter and oil in my trans. He said I don't need to touch the trans as it's a lifetime fluid in it. I still pressed him and he threw out a ball park figure of about $240.
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102, 2018 ZRE182
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Actually, the term "cvt" (continiously variable transmission) is a generic one. The difference is whether a CVT achieves its continuously variable thing via push-belt, pull-chain or planetary set.
The eCVT/HSD doesn't achieve the continuously variable thing via a planetary gearset though (those are fixed-ratio), it is via the addition of a differential on the input-side of the gearbox and electric motor/generators in the system which give the characteristic CVT "slip" ability. In essence it is the input motor/generator which is the "CVT" and the planetary is just a final-drive.
 

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2001 Camry LE
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Hurry up because I'm not sure many Honda or any other manufacturer still use dipstick. Technically, no transmission is "sealed": they all have a drain plug and a fill plug. There are many theories surrounding the disappearance of dipstick in transmission, from manufacturers wanting to save on assembly to wanting to sell replacement transmission... but the truth is that there is an engineering advantage in preventing air and contaminants contact with fluid. Plus newer transmission, AT or CVT, requiring precise parameters to operate, their fluid maintenance are no longer like oil in engine. Still serviceable, just in a different way.
I think Hyundai/Kia's sealed transmissions are similar to Toyota's with the fill bolt on the side and supposedly needing to measure the temperature when changing the fluid. This type isn't terrible but not easy. Subaru's CVT is like the Corolla where the fluid needs to be pumped in from the bottom. I think this is the case with newer Nissan CVTs too. These are the most difficult to change fluid and I would need to pay someone to do it. The process on Honda's CVT is simpler, there is a fill bolt on the top (no dipstick) and then a check level bolt on the side where you simply fill the transmission until it leaks out the check level bolt. Some vehicles like the Pilot still have a traditional 6 speed automatic with dipstick.
 

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I'll keep this Toyota relevant. The only thing mentioned in the maintenance schedule is to check the trans for any leaks. That's it. From your posted schedule, I find it dubious that they list the transmission fluid/oil as an inspect item. In my opinion, if the fluid has oddities in it such as burnt smell, then it's already too late to do anything about it.

I mentioned to my service adviser at my dealership as to how much they charge to change the filter and oil in my trans. He said I don't need to touch the trans as it's a lifetime fluid in it. I still pressed him and he threw out a ball park figure of about $240.
It wasn't cheap when my parents changed the CVT fluids on the Nissan Versa, the dealer charged them $10/L and the bill came to CAD$300.

It's simple, the "advisor" doesn't know the actual cost for CVT fluid replacement because it is not part of the service packages. If the advisor go ask the tech, him/her can likely give more idea how much fluid you need, and how much time it takes. Then they can quote you the fluids + hours of labour which the current rate is CAD$120/hr.

I think the car is still relatively new, and most of our preemptive services aren't exactly due so I would not be surprised they don't know.
 

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2001 Camry LE
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Sounds about right. Cost to change CVT fluid at a dealer on Corolla, Subaru, or Nissan are all over $200 USD. The fluid itself is expensive along with the labor. On some older Nissans (2008-2013 Rogue or 2007-2012 Altima/Sentra) you could change the fluid yourself, since there was a dipstick, but I think they've since sealed it off and the fluid needs to be pumped in from the bottom.
 

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2001 Camry LE
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so eCVT: is the system also sealed and fluid pumped in from the bottom ?
I think it is. Someone else can chime in on this. I think the e-CVT is easier though because it doesn't need to be at operating temperature(?)... don't quote me on that...
 

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It wasn't cheap when my parents changed the CVT fluids on the Nissan Versa, the dealer charged them $10/L and the bill came to CAD$300.

It's simple, the "advisor" doesn't know the actual cost for CVT fluid replacement because it is not part of the service packages. If the advisor go ask the tech, him/her can likely give more idea how much fluid you need, and how much time it takes. Then they can quote you the fluids + hours of labour which the current rate is CAD$120/hr.

I think the car is still relatively new, and most of our preemptive services aren't exactly due so I would not be surprised they don't know.
The SA didn't know not because the car is relatively new. It's more because as you said it's not a standard service that gets done. This follows on to the whole declaration from Toyota that the fluid in the trans is lifetime. I don't know when Toyota started using CVTs in their line up. But I would think there are a significant number of these transmissions which are at or above 50k miles by now. This brings back a memory of a conversation I heard while working with my SA on getting my car in for the complimentary routine service. The conversation centered around the owner's Tacoma. Don't remember if it was a 2018 or 2019. What grabbed my attention was the one SA working with that owner's truck had 80,000 miles on it.

Have to go back to my experience with BMW on this topic. When I got my 135i new I was looking for a dealership to do a fluid/filter service on that car after completing the break in procedure. Everyone advised not to mess with the trans. I made friends with a tech working at my dealership. Even with his 20+ years of experience, he said he's never done a fluid service on a DCT (the trans in my car). In the end he agreed to help by doing the work. But he modified the trans service by only replacing the filter which is externally accessible. The other filter is in the sump of the trans and would require the belly pan of the trans to be dropped.
 

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TN の がしょう
2015 Camry XSE V6
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The 86 is stupidly offered with an automatic.
It's not as stupid compared to a travesty WRX w/ CVT transmission that Subaru started offering since 2013.
I'm so appalled on how much used car dealerships are reselling CVT WRX compared to manual ones.

Come to think I almost got one with a CVT because my wife can't drive stick but I wanted a WRX. I'm glad I took better judgement and went with the Camry.

OP, when it comes down to CVT, I would be more comfortable getting a Toyota with CVT instead of Nissan, Subaru, or any other MFG only because I have not heard much complaints about Toyota's CVT transmissions. Nissan and Subarus though get a lot of complaints from what I see.

From what I know, only a handful of models have CVT transmissions:

C-HR, Corolla, Corolla Hatchback. Hybrids have different type of CVT transmission that is different from non-hybrids.
 

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According to Scotty Kilmer, CVT is cheaper to make and is easier to achieve good gas mileage. He also made fun of "lifetime fluid" is for the "lifetime" of the warranty or lease. To me, it makes total sense... many people get new cars every 5-7 years and the car manufactuers want you to get another car around that time.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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According to Scotty Kilmer, CVT is cheaper to make and is easier to achieve good gas mileage. He also made fun of "lifetime fluid" is for the "lifetime" of the warranty or lease. To me, it makes total sense... many people get new cars every 5-7 years and the car manufactuers want you to get another car around that time.
Exactly, if you want your car to last, change the fluids more often than recommended. It won't hurt anything and is the cheapest of insurance to a healthy car.
 

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2018 Yaris LE hatch, 2020 Yaris LE hatch
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Nissan's Jatco built CVT's are the "notorious" ones.
 

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I'm looking to purchase a Toyota in the future, but I want an automatic transmission that's not a CVT.

Also, something that has a timing chain, not timing belt.

What year is the last Corolla that has a regular automatic transmission and a timing chain?
I know this is an old thread but maybe it willl help someone else if opnis gone. I recommend in his case the Camry with the 6 speed auto. The 2.3 is surprisingly bquick, don't bother going for the six cyl. They went to an 8 speed in 2018 that was a disaster for a lot of people like Jeep's 9 speed. Until more time passes personally I would only consider a cvt in a Honda. Also avoid direct injection like the plague. That's also being phased in.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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I know this is an old thread but maybe it willl help someone else if opnis gone. I recommend in his case the Camry with the 6 speed auto. The 2.3 is surprisingly bquick, don't bother going for the six cyl. They went to an 8 speed in 2018 that was a disaster for a lot of people like Jeep's 9 speed. Until more time passes personally I would only consider a cvt in a Honda. Also avoid direct injection like the plague. That's also being phased in.
The 8AT in the new Camry needed a flash to change a few things to make it more drivable but the transmission has been fine since the re-flash.
 

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Nissan's Jatco built CVT's are the "notorious" ones.
I had the Nissan X-Trail, the CVT transmission was replaced 3 times within 3 years of my ownership. I got rid of it a few weeks before the warranty expired.
Because of the bad experience with Nissan CVT transmission so tried to avoid car with CVT. Before I bought my 2019 Corolla with a CVT I was looking for a 1.8 AT 2013-2014 model, but couldn't find one with low km so I had to bite the bullet and I bought my 2019 with the CVT with the assurance of Toyota reliability and 5 years unlimited km warranty. A manual Corolla would be my perfect choice but sadly for me the wife can't drive a manual car. But I believe if the car is well looked after then it will have less problems during the ownership unless it's the manufactures' design flaw then it's bad luck.
 

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The 8AT in the new Camry needed a flash to change a few things to make it more drivable but the transmission has been fine since the re-flash.
To be fair, the stock transmission itself has been fine. I gave the car enough time to learn my habits, and the 8-AT transmission is just as smooth as the 4AT on the corolla. Patience, that's all it took :)
 

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There have been complaints about the driveability of the 8AT on the Camry, but I haven't heard of any outright failing, so I wouldn't consider it a reliability problem like the dreadful Nissan CVTs.

When the 2014 Corolla first came out I too was skeptical about its long term reliability. However, it's been almost 7 years and I have been pleasantly surprised. Nissan's CVT still gives me pause, but Honda and Subaru both seem to have very few reported problems (Subaru more than Honda). The Corolla's CVT seems to be the best of them all, though, and I really haven't heard of anyone having issues with it. I would plan on changing the CVT fluid every 60K or so and at this point wouldn't be concerned about owning one.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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I had the Nissan X-Trail, the CVT transmission was replaced 3 times within 3 years of my ownership. I got rid of it a few weeks before the warranty expired.
Because of the bad experience with Nissan CVT transmission so tried to avoid car with CVT. Before I bought my 2019 Corolla with a CVT I was looking for a 1.8 AT 2013-2014 model, but couldn't find one with low km so I had to bite the bullet and I bought my 2019 with the CVT with the assurance of Toyota reliability and 5 years unlimited km warranty. A manual Corolla would be my perfect choice but sadly for me the wife can't drive a manual car. But I believe if the car is well looked after then it will have less problems during the ownership unless it's the manufactures' design flaw then it's bad luck.
I was going to ask you why not just get a MT Corolla. You can always teach you wife to drive a MT. I taught all 3 of my daughters and they love it. My wife already knew how to drive a MT when I met her. :)
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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There have been complaints about the driveability of the 8AT on the Camry, but I haven't heard of any outright failing, so I wouldn't consider it a reliability problem like the dreadful Nissan CVTs.

When the 2014 Corolla first came out I too was skeptical about its long term reliability. However, it's been almost 7 years and I have been pleasantly surprised. Nissan's CVT still gives me pause, but Honda and Subaru both seem to have very few reported problems (Subaru more than Honda). The Corolla's CVT seems to be the best of them all, though, and I really haven't heard of anyone having issues with it. I would plan on changing the CVT fluid every 60K or so and at this point wouldn't be concerned about owning one.
The drivability issues seem to have been worked out from owners on the forums. The best CVT's are in the hybrid vehicles since they are a planetary gear design and they are bullet proof. So if you get a Prius, Corolla hybrid, RAV4 hybrid, Camry hybrid or Avalon hybrid you are in business.
 
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