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I'm trying to avoid the cost (both money and time) of visiting the dealer. I'm thinking I should probably wait until I replace my tires and have this taken care of then.
 

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I'm trying to avoid the cost (both money and time) of visiting the dealer. I'm thinking I should probably wait until I replace my tires and have this taken care of then.
I read the sensors inside the tires should last from 5 to 8 years for the 2007 TCH. The new 2012's should last up to 10 years. I never looked at the 2009 though 2011 models to see the expediency of those sensor batteries.
 

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Since my car is 5 years old, I'm thinking one of my sensor batteries may need to be replaced. Can I do this myself? If so, how? Thanks.
Yes, you can do this yourself. You would have to break down the one tire that had the bad sensor. Do all four tires to replace all 4 sensors. The sensors come with the battery already attached. They are made as one unit.

I would think the new replacement sensors would last twice as long as the old ones. A independent or chain tire shop should be cheaper at replacing a single or all your tire sensors if they are suspect.
 

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TPMS showing different PSI from my tire gauge

TPMS shows 40 PSI while my manual tire gauge shows 70 on 2 of the tires.

Also on one of my tire, I feel a little water coming out as I press the valve.

Tomorrow, I will go buy another tire gauge to see what it says.
 

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Many cheap gauges are far from accurate. I tossed two recently after I tested them on a known 50 psi source. One said 38 psi (a Discount tire chrome nice looking gauge) and one said 60 (Autozone cheapie).

I'd bet your TPMS is at least close to right.
 

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I bought a 3 digit Accutire digital gauge MS-4021B for $9.95 from Amazon about 6 months ago. Joes Racing dial gauge is another that Consumer Reports rates really high.

I set my tires to 40 psi 'cold' using this same gauge and the tire pressure screen matches. doznI4SE, it took me two nights to get mine inside the 0.5 reading. Not easy as I was letting them down from 44 psi nitrogen.
 

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TPMS shows 40 PSI while my manual tire gauge shows 70 on 2 of the tires.

Also on one of my tires, I feel a little water coming out as I press the valve.

Tomorrow, I will go buy another tire gauge to see what it says.
Not sure what the moisture in that one tire can do. This is another reason for using nitrogen as it resist any moisture getting into the tires. If your using air you might have a tire shop let it down then air it up with a quality dry air compressor. A good chance the tire with the moisture could mess up any tire gauge. Walmart automotive/tire shop is pretty low priced working with a single tire problem. Discount Tire Store if one is nearby may not even charge.
 

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...........Also on one of my tire, I feel a little water coming out as I press the valve.......
Did that tire have the valve cap on securely?

Was it raining or wet when you checked the tire?

Was this tire mounted at the factory, done aftermarket, and has this tire had any work done to it after factory?

I'm trying to understand the possible source of this water you saw.
 

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:wtf: Really? Can you site a credible source that says nitrogen resists moisture? That's just plain BS!
One of the benefits of nitrogen being used in airplane tires to reduce water vapors. Nitrogen is used in the NASCAR tires preventing any rim corrosion.

Look for the words water and water vapor mentioned six or more times on this page.

http://www.getnitrogen.org/why/index.php

This from a older site.

http://www.tireblast.com/2009/02/nitrogen-for-your-tires.html

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/question594.htm

Why nitrogen in truck tires.

http://www.nitrofill.com/nitrogen-in-tires.aspx

The Indy race cars use nitrogen for the same reasons as the NASCAR teams.
 

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Nitrogen does not resist water vapor. It just doesn't contain humidity when a clean source is used.

Race teams (of all kinds) use nitrogen because it is more stable pressure-wise as it heats. It has nothing to do with corrosion.

So many myths about the wonders of nitrogen...
 

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Nitrogen does not resist water vapor. It just doesn't contain humidity when a clean source is used.

Race teams (of all kinds) use nitrogen because it is more stable pressure-wise as it heats. It has nothing to do with corrosion.

So many myths about the wonders of nitrogen...
Yea, right..

This article is not about the nitrogen. It's really about reducing oxygen and water vapor in your tires. The air in our tires is composed of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and about 1% water vapor and other gases. When pure dry nitrogen is used to replace the air in your tires it improves fuel efficiency, handling and it will extend the life of steel rims or custom wheels and tires. By reducing oxygen and water vapor in your tires from 22% to less than 7%, your tires will maintain pressure three to four times longer. Plus it will keep you safer on the highway.

How does oxygen and water damage my rims and tires? Oxygen, especially at high temperatures and pressures, corrodes aluminum, steel wheels and rubber. This process is called oxidation. When oxidation occurs small particles of rust and aluminum oxidization in your steel or aluminum wheels can clog valve stems, causing them to leak. The oxidation can cause the surfaces of your wheel flange and tire beads not to seal properly causing another leak point.

Oxygen can also age the thin layer of rubber called the inner liner or radial ply. As the inner liner ages, more and more air migrates through the rubber, causing additional pressure losses. As oxygen migrates through rubber it can come in contact with steel belts and the steel bead causing them to rust.

While both nitrogen and oxygen can migrate through rubber, nitrogen does it much slower. It might take six months to lose a couple of pounds of nitrogen, compared to less than a month with wet compressed air. Dry nitrogen does not cause rust and corrosion on steel rims or aluminum custom wheels, and it does not degrade rubber like wet compressed air.
 

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I'll agree with most of that. The fuel economy and handling claims are pretty much wishful thinking, but it does make sense to use a less caustic and more stable fill for your tires where possible. Problem is... most places don't have a way to pull a vacuum and remove the air that's already in the tire. They just fill them with nitrogen. Partially effective at least I guess.
 

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I'll agree with most of that. The fuel economy and handling claims are pretty much wishful thinking, but it does make sense to use a less caustic and more stable fill for your tires where possible. Problem is... most places don't have a way to pull a vacuum and remove the air that's already in the tire. They just fill them with nitrogen. Partially effective at least I guess.
I rented a tank of nitrogen from a welding supplier here in town years ago to do my '07 TCH tires. When I bought the '12 XLE TCH the dealer had already put nitrogen in them. The hybrid tech told me this new nitrogen generator they use has the ability to somehow pulse the tires eliminating almost all the air, then fills them to normal pressure with nitrogen. It was like $35 added to the cost of my new car.

My favorite thing about using nitrogen is you only have to add a pound ever 6 months. I like to run a consistent tire pressure and this sure helps. I have the dealer add to max 44 psi with nitrogen. In late October when it's cold at night I let the tires down to the desired pressure. This way when I drive off and is 30F degrees outside, I know my tires are at 40 psi. I would run 35 psi if I lived in a icy/snowy area for safety. I also read that nitrogen can help the tires last longer.
 
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