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If one of wheels spins much faster, traction control holds it. This makes another wheel spin.
This is exactly what LSD does.
Am I right?
It is important to me because I want replace my Dodge Durango with LSD to Toyota truck, which doesn't have LSD, but it has traction control. I guess I can go to the beach and feel OK driving on sand.
Traction is even better because it will make 4 wheels spin on sand, but my Durango will only have 3 wheels spinning (only rear diff. is LSD)
Am I right?
 

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Depends upon which model and version of traction-control you have.
What you want is A-TRAC . Other variations:

1) 2WD: VSC and TRAC active, 'Vehicle Stability Contro'l and 'Traction Control' (Limited Slip Diff.).
2) 2WD: Switch turns off 'TRAC' and 'VSC', and turns on 'AUTO LSD'. Gives maximum power to tire with traction by braking spinning tire, without cutting power.
3) 2WD: 3 second push of switch turns off VSC, TRAC & AUTO LSD for open differential.

4) 4WD-Hi: VSC and TRAC are both on. No engine power is cut in TRAC while in H4.
5) 4WD-Hi: 3 second push of switch turns off VSC and TRAC.

6) 4WD-Lo: VSC and TRAC are off (open differentials).
7) 4WD-Lo: Push of A-TRAC button activates A-TRAC (Locker-like limited slip).
8) 4WD-Lo: Push of RR DIFF LOCK switch to lock rear differential.
9) 4WD-Lo: RR DIFF LOCK and A-TRAC combined. 3 MPH limit.
 

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If one of wheels spins much faster, traction control holds it. This makes another wheel spin.
This is exactly what LSD does.
Am I right?
It is important to me because I want replace my Dodge Durango with LSD to Toyota truck, which doesn't have LSD, but it has traction control. I guess I can go to the beach and feel OK driving on sand.
Traction is even better because it will make 4 wheels spin on sand, but my Durango will only have 3 wheels spinning (only rear diff. is LSD)
Am I right?
There are two main variants in traction control.
Most cars just have on road traction control which you turn off when going off-road because when you get wheel spin reduces the engine power in an attempt to regain traction.
Some of the newer 4x4s have an off-road Traction control which uses the brakes to stop the spinning wheel therefore transferring power to the wheel with grip (yes, same principle as LSD).
I wouldn't worry about the Toyota, almost any car with a bit of ground clearance, decent tyres and lowered tyre pressures can drive on sand with ease.
 

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A mechanical LSD using clutches locks both wheels together which means the vehicle looses directional stability (spinning wheels don't provide much lateral grip.) Traction control is supposed to keep one wheel at "road speed" so lateral stability is not lost. Rear wheel drive cars with an LSD would often do big fishtails on a slippery surface as BOTH wheels were spinning faster than road speed. I had LSDs in several RWD Volvos. I learned quickly to feather the throttle in slippery corners least I fishtail off the road. In a straight line, with snow tires, the car would handle snow easily. One could park on a road with the right side wheels in snow and be quite sure you would be able to drive out, even on a hill, so long as the left rear was on bare pavement. Still, snow tires and front wheel drive is probably better and traction control makes it harder to get BOTH frone wheels spinning with the result you lose steering ability. RWD "drift" cars light up both rear wheels which when covered with melted rubber allow the rear end to run at crazy angles with respect to direction of travel.
 
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