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what should I do? I attempted to change and flush my ATF in my 2005 corrola. Got a filter kit with gasket, 7 quarts of T-IV compatible Castorl ATF and got to work. I drained the pan and took it off to find that, both the gasket and the filter the auto parts store gave me doesn't fit. So I cleaned the pan and the outside of the old filter with brake cleaner, dried them thoroughly and put them back on with a thin coat of liquid gasket on the old gasket. Thats disaster number one. Disconected the tranny lines to the radiator and pointed them to a bucket. Added fluid had a friend start the car, and started dumping fluid in to replace what was coming out. But it wouldn't fill fast enough to compensate for what was being pumped out and the fluid started sputtering which told me it emptied the pan and was sucking air. However the fluid ran bright red before it started coughing so the old stuff got out. Reattached the hoses tried to re fill the AT to find I was about 3/4 a quart low. I test drove it and it ran/shifted fine. Can I drive it to the store (30 miles away) to get more fluid or should I have a friend take me? Should I try and return the mis-sized part i was sold and demand they give me a few quarts of free fluid since I will have to drain the pan to replace the filter screen? Or am I fine just using the old filter and gasket (as long as it doesn't leak)? Also, did I ruin my tranny by letting it suck air? Thanks in advance!
 

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you didn't ruin the tranny if you sucked some air, as long as you weren't revving the life out of it while you did your flush you shouldn't have a problem. you said you were about a quart low after you filled up; was this with the fluid at operating temp, or cold? as the fluid will expand as it's heated.


as long as you don't have leaks i would just leave the old gasket on ans get a refund on the new one and buy the correct gasket from toyota when you do your next flush or drain and fill.

if the vehicle drives fine i would drive it to the store for the extra fluid, but if you have any signs of slipping, i would cease and desist. just avoid high rpms and overrevving ( aka drive rationally.)
 

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first of all, i would just like to know why didn't you go buy the filter and gasket at your local toyota dealer? I have read in the web that those filter and gasket from autoparts store doesn't fit most of the time...that is why i would get the genuine ones at a toyota dealer. Now, im not saying that all of those doesn't fit, it may have just been a mistake..maybe the autoparts store read the number wrong and got the wrong parts for your car.

i say if you have a friend that could drive you then do that instead of driving your car so that you could avoid another disaster.

also i say go return the parts..get ur money back and get the same atf fluid with the money that you got back...why would you keep the parts that you wouldn't be able to use...
 

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2002 Camry
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I too sucked some air and got a bit of sputtering when I changed the fluid on my Camry. When this happened, I just had my assistant shut off the engine and then I dumped a funnel full of fluid down the dipstick hole to allow it to catch up before I ran the engine again. I found that it comes out of the transmission cooler line slightly faster than than it goes in the dipstick hole. I found that running the engine for about 10-15 seconds at a time worked pretty good with no subsequent sputtering. The sputtering will not damage your transmission.

I bought an aftermarket gasket and strainer kit for a fraction of the cost of OEM (around $20) and it fit perfectly. Next time, I won't bother to replace my strainer. It was very clean.
 

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Celica91:

First, allow me to applaud your decision to do this job yourself. The dealer by me won't even take my car in to do this drain/fill, and they have to special order the filter and gasket. I just did my 2004 Corolla with A/T at 100,000 miles. I bought the filter and gasket kit from Advance Auto, it was a Pro-King FK-284. The gasket turned out to be the wrong size (it was close, but too long - probably for the standard tranny). The filter looked like it would fit fine, but since the gasket would not, I decided to clean the filter (a mesh screen type) in a parts washer and re-use it and the gasket, then return the filter and gasket for a refund.

I did not use any sealant when reusing the old gasket - I could not find a brand that recommended use on a tranny - tranny fluid eats most liquid sealants. I carefully torqued the pan back on using a star pattern and I have had no leaks.

Observations/lessons learned: My car is primarily an interstate highway commuter. The mesh filter screen was filthy and the magnets on the pan were buried in particulate. The oil was not burned, but not the brilliant red of the fresh stuff. I didn't purge via the cooler lines and replaced only 4 quarts total. The transmission responds much smoother than it did, but it wasn't bad to begin with. Good lesson here - prior to dropping a pan, always hold the new gasket up to the pan before removing to make sure it is the right one. (I meant to do this, but my son got ahead of me and had the pan off before I had the chance). So long as you have ATF on the dipstick while the engine is cold, running, and in PARK, you should be fine to drive it to the store for more ATF (the level will go up as the tranny heats up). I always make the final level adjustments with the transmission hot and idling in PARK. Good luck.
 

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2002 Camry
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My experience is that if you don't drain via the cooler return line, the remaining dirty fluid in the torque converter and cooler will mix with the new fluid that you just added and contaminate it within a few days. I can vouch for this from personal experience on my 1996 Camry. I got about 3 liters out by dropping the pan. In a couple days, the fluid looked approximately the same reddish-brown color that I had before I dropped the pan. So, in the end, I drained via the cooler line until cherry red fluid was coming out the cooler return line. The fluid still looks new, months later.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=280006

I have not had to change the fluid on my 2008 Corolla yet. I just bought mine a couple of weeks ago. So I dont have any first hand experience about a Corolla transmission fluid change. I am dreading the cost of the T-IV fluid. The dealers up here in Canada rape us. At least with the Camry, I can use aftermarket Dexron III which is only about $3/liter. By the way, I used an aftermarket Pro King kit too. $20. No problem with the gasket or strainer size.

Phillyhouse - I was very surprised to hear that your strainer was dirty. That is opposite my experience. My strainer was extremely clean. There was a thin film of metal dust on the pan and magnets with very little grit in the pan. Next time, I am planning to simply flush and forgo changing the strainer.
 

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Hmmm.

Not sure why mine was so dirty. I did the job at 100K, first time I had ever done anything to it. The manual never tells you to do anything until 100K (and then only if you are under the "special operating conditions") but I decided my gently driven '04 was due for a drain and refill. I would estimate that there was about the equivalent of a tablespoon of black metal granules on the magnets alone. I completely blackened a paper towel when wiping out the inside of the pan.

I had considered doing the cooler line purge procedure, but felt that the risk to the tranny was not worth the gain of a quart or two of fresh fluid. I plan to just drain and fill more often now that I cleaned out the filter....
 

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Used to do the drain and refill but now do the cooler line disconnect. The fluid cleans up nicely and stays clean, unlike a drain and refill that mixes new and old.

It takes about 10 quarts to purge the refill the trans. You can do the job yourself just be quick on turning the engine off before all the fluid comes out of the trans.

You will never be able to add fluid quickly enough to compensate for the fluid that is coming out the hose. Overfill the trans pan, start the engine to pump most of it out, stop engine and refill.

Use a transparent plastic bottle to catch the fluid coming out. If you know how much you put into the trans, you know how much you can let flow out before turning the engine off. Start off with a drain and refill.
 

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2002 Camry
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Hmmm.

Not sure why mine was so dirty. I did the job at 100K, first time I had ever done anything to it. The manual never tells you to do anything until 100K
That may be the reason it was pretty dirty. I did mine after only 60,000 km = approximately 40,000 miles. This is mostly city driving with a few longer vacation trips. I am not sure what the recommended service interval is for the transmission fluid on the Camry. Mine was starting to get brownish-red, so I just decided to change it.

I had considered doing the cooler line purge procedure, but felt that the risk to the tranny was not worth the gain of a quart or two of fresh fluid
It's more than just a gain of a quart or two doing the cooler line purge. More like 6 quarts. Based on my experience with the Camry, a drain and refill only seems to get out about 3 quarts of transmission fluid. A full exchange requires about 10 quarts - like Toyomoyo said. I am not sure if the Corolla holds less than the Camry? I am also not sure if the Corolla has a separate chamber for the differential like the GEN3 Camry. I don't think it does. I still need to research this some more.
 
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