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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Toyota needs to cut cost for sure, they didn't put power seats in SE model, and no TMPS.

I never like the power seat. Mechanical seat is far easier to adjust. To put down seat back, I pull the lever and the back drop instantly, unlike power seat takes 20 second. To move seat backwards, I use my heel to lift the bar, instantly it moves back by 5 inches, it takes power seat another 20 second to move back.

TMPS gives me trouble too. The warn light is always on. false alarm. I check tire pressure regularly, no need the warning light, especially the false light.
 

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Toyota needs to cut cost for sure, they didn't put power seats in SE model, and no TMPS.

I never like the power seat. Mechanical seat is far easier to adjust. To put down seat back, I pull the lever and the back drop instantly, unlike power seat takes 20 second. To move seat backwards, I use my heel to lift the bar, instantly it moves back by 5 inches, it takes power seat another 20 second to move back.

TMPS gives me trouble too. The warn light is always on. false alarm. I check tire pressure regularly, no need the warning light, especially the false light.
You are wasting more than 40 seconds typing these unnecessary posts. After the seat is set why do you need to readjust in the course of your life that time means nothing?

I think that all cars built no matter what region they go to have TPMS. Even though it's not by law required in Canada. It doesn't really save any money for a manufacturer to delete it, especially when it's such a good safety feature.
 

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Apparently CAD didn't see enough data to justify a mandate like in the US. So I doubt there's any incentive to include them for cars sold in CAD.
 

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Yep... The Canadian models may not have the direct pressure display on the dash, but the TPMS is there.

OTOH, our Canadian friends can't shut off their DRLs ;)
 

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You are wasting more than 40 seconds typing these unnecessary posts. After the seat is set why do you need to readjust in the course of your life that time means nothing?

I think that all cars built no matter what region they go to have TPMS. Even though it's not by law required in Canada. It doesn't really save any money for a manufacturer to delete it, especially when it's such a good safety feature.
I don't know about that. Those TPMS sensors are what about $70-100 per wheel? Multiply that by 100K+/- cars. That's a lot of money.
 

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I don't know about that. Those TPMS sensors are what about $70-100 per wheel? Multiply that by 100K+/- cars. That's a lot of money.
You are talking about retail prices.
Just how many sensors of any type do you think the order for a generational run? At least 2 million or more.

I will contend that yes it is a lot of money when it's added up but it really doesn't matter when they just add it to the price of the vehicle.
 

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You are talking about retail prices.
Just how many sensors of any type do you think the order for a generational run? At least 2 million or more.

I will contend that yes it is a lot of money when it's added up but it really doesn't matter when they just add it to the price of the vehicle.
True the manufacture cost is probably $40(no idea, just wild guess)? But yeah, for those bean counters every little bit that's discontented adds up. But I get your point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Around world 800+K Corolla sold every year. Ten cents per car saving is a lot. Toyota has a complicated configuration system for the cars around the world. In Asia and Europe more than half million sold without those many options in US and Canada, and vice versa. Even the same engine has different output, emission and fuel economy configuration in different countries. In China Toyota even have two generations of Corolla sold in different name simultaneously.
 

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True the manufacture cost is probably $40(no idea, just wild guess)? But yeah, for those bean counters every little bit that's discontented adds up. But I get your point.
Consumer retail for wife’s 2007 Prius is $42.37 for a genuine Denso TPMS from Denso themselves.
Other auto part sellers may sell Genuine Denso for high $30s to low $40s.
Toyota maybe gets manufacture volume discounted price of $15-$20?

 

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Around world 800+K Corolla sold every year. Ten cents per car saving is a lot. Toyota has a complicated configuration system for the cars around the world. In Asia and Europe more than half million sold without those many options in US and Canada, and vice versa. Even the same engine has different output, emission and fuel economy configuration in different countries. In China Toyota even have two generations of Corolla sold in different name simultaneously.
There are also costs associated with stocking different parts for different models.
These capital and inventory costs may exceed the "few cents" that are saved per unit sold in countries that don't require specific features.

This is also why many sub-premium models already have the wiring in place for premium options, such as cruise control, intermittent wipers (added them to my '08 Tacoma base model for maybe $250?), fog lights, etc....
 

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I don't know about that. Those TPMS sensors are what about $70-100 per wheel? Multiply that by 100K+/- cars. That's a lot of money.

Well I have TPMS on my base model S 2022 HB that's so low spec'd they don't even sell it in the USA, so it can't be so much of a saving to them to justify ensuring no models going to Canada have them or not because there was zero chance my car was going to any market other than Canada when it was being built.. I'd rather not have it, but it doesn't really matter. Just a warning light to ignore when the batteries die or I put on my snow tires which I didn't bother paying to put TPMS sensors on.
 

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There are also costs associated with stocking different parts for different models.
These capital and inventory costs may exceed the "few cents" that are saved per unit sold in countries that don't require specific features.

This is also why many sub-premium models already have the wiring in place for premium options, such as cruise control, intermittent wipers (added them to my '08 Tacoma base model for maybe $250?), fog lights, etc....
Not to mention the costs of having variations on your assembly lines.
 

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The Corolla is sold worldwide. For cost cutting, it would make more sense for Toyota to be strategic in finding ways to cut cost somewhere that can be applied across the board, instead of a small market like Canada. Keep in mind that if they sell 1 million Corolla’s, every dollar saved translates to $1M profit.
Car manufacturers understand different people have different needs and budgets. That’s why most vehicles are sold with different trims for different prices. No power seats in the SE is not necessary for costing cutting reasons, it is more likely just to satisfy customers who do not want the power seat, or do not want to pay for them, or both.
I have no need for power seats either, not because they are slower to adjust, but mainly to keep things simple and less to break. We had cars before with power seats, some with memory, some even programmed to the individual keys. They are fancy, but I can count the number of times we use the feature with 2 hands for the entire time we owned each of the cars. I also I like to keep the car weight down where possible.
Our 2019 HB SE Upgrade came with TPMS. It is not something we want, but we could not get one without at the time. It is not a big deal, we live with it.
 

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Our 2019 HB SE Upgrade came with TPMS. It is not something we want, but we could not get one without at the time. It is not a big deal, we live with it.
Corolla Hatchback is made in Japan, so it always has TPMS, be it sold in USA or Canada... What you get is the world's most well engineered car, so any complaint is futile. If you don't like it, good luck with your VW, Hyundai, Honda, Chrysler/Dodge/Ram or GMC product.

Toyota New Global Architecture

The Toyota New Global Architecture (abbreviated as TNGA) are modular automobile platforms that underpin various Toyota and Lexus models starting with the fourth-generation Prius in late 2015. TNGA platforms accommodate different vehicle sizes and also front-, rear- and all-wheel drive configurations.

The platforms were developed as part of a company-wide effort to simplify the vehicles being produced by Toyota. Before the introduction of the TNGA, Toyota was building roughly 100 different platform variants.As of 2020, the five TNGA platforms underpin more than 50% of Toyota vehicles sold worldwide and is expected to underpin about 80% by 2023.

Each platform is based on a standardized seat height that allows for sharing of key interior components such as steering systems, shifters, pedals, seat frames and airbags. These components are often less visible, allowing for cars that share platforms to have unique interiors. Compared to Toyota's older platforms, TNGA costs 20 percent less to produce while offering increased chassis stiffness, lower centers of gravity for better handling and lower hood cowls for better forward visibility.

The TNGA platform was developed alongside the Dynamic Force engine, which similarly is replacing more than 800 engine variants with a much simpler lineup of 17 versions of nine engines. Toyota is also simplifying its lineup of transmissions, hybrid systems, and all-wheel drive systems.


TNGA-C (GA-C)
The TNGA-C platform underpins unibody vehicles in the C-segment or compact car, and subcompact/compact crossover SUV categories. The platform is offered in both front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive variants and is paired with a transverse engine. The platform also supports a wheelbase length of 2,640–2,850 mm (103.9–112.2 in). TNGA-C replaces the older MC/New MC platform.

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
The Corolla is sold worldwide. For cost cutting, it would make more sense for Toyota to be strategic in finding ways to cut cost somewhere that can be applied across the board, instead of a small market like Canada. Keep in mind that if they sell 1 million Corolla’s, every dollar saved translates to $1M profit.
Car manufacturers understand different people have different needs and budgets. That’s why most vehicles are sold with different trims for different prices. No power seats in the SE is not necessary for costing cutting reasons, it is more likely just to satisfy customers who do not want the power seat, or do not want to pay for them, or both.
I have no need for power seats either, not because they are slower to adjust, but mainly to keep things simple and less to break. We had cars before with power seats, some with memory, some even programmed to the individual keys. They are fancy, but I can count the number of times we use the feature with 2 hands for the entire time we owned each of the cars. I also I like to keep the car weight down where possible.
Our 2019 HB SE Upgrade came with TPMS. It is not something we want, but we could not get one without at the time. It is not a big deal, we live with it.
What you said is Toyota JIT just in time system is an efficiency improvement method renowned in manufacturing, now spread into everywhere such as retail and hospitals systems. The cost of inventory and management was invisible to many before Taiichi Ono sees it. Reduce the cost by improve efficiency and reduce waste is the core practice/value of Toyota, instead of cutting corners.

The SE model has many bells and whistles more than I need. It is kind of luxury to me. 😀
 

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The indirect TPMS on our Mk VII VW Golfs has saved my bacon more than once. The Mk VI Golf that I had that didn't have it, nearly killed me with a blowout on the autoroute. Though I do check pressures, on a regular basis, I didn't check them every day when I commuted and never noticed the left rear tire was a little low; I was running a little late for a client meeting that morning. It blew out at speed, in the fast lane. I managed to pull over but it was a spot too dangerous to change a tire, so I called in a tow.

On my Golfs, the indirect system has correctly identified individual flats, or all tires a bit low. That happened after a winter tire changeover at a reputable tire shop. They never checked the pressures, and the TPMS pinged on the way home (8 km). All tires were down by more than 10 psi as they had been stored all summer.

I live on a gravel road and get frequent flats from sharp rocks and the occasional nail or screw. No TPMS is one thing I really dislike on my Corolla (not to mention the crappy Hankook tires, the brand that has given me the most flats ever and was what blew out in the above incident). An indirect system is cheap (it uses ABS sensors and an algorithm), does not require a second set of sensors for winter tires, and while it won't give the exact pressure of each tire, it will correctly identify a low tire(s).
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The indirect TPMS on our Mk VII VW Golfs has saved my bacon more than once. The Mk VI Golf that I had that didn't have it, nearly killed me with a blowout on the autoroute. Though I do check pressures, on a regular basis, I didn't check them every day when I commuted and never noticed the left rear tire was a little low; I was running a little late for a client meeting that morning. It blew out at speed, in the fast lane. I managed to pull over but it was a spot too dangerous to change a tire, so I called in a tow.

On my Golfs, the indirect system has correctly identified individual flats, or all tires a bit low. That happened after a winter tire changeover at a reputable tire shop. They never checked the pressures, and the TPMS pinged on the way home (8 km). All tires were down by more than 10 psi as they had been stored all summer.

I live on a gravel road and get frequent flats from sharp rocks and the occasional nail or screw. No TPMS is one thing I really dislike on my Corolla (not to mention the crappy Hankook tires, the brand that has given me the most flats ever and was what blew out in the above incident). An indirect system is cheap (it uses ABS sensors and an algorithm), does not require a second set of sensors for winter tires, and while it won't give the exact pressure of each tire, it will correctly identify a low tire(s).
In your situation seems definitely it is necessary. On my wife's Infiniti Q50 the TPMS light always on since new. We spend $60x4=240 before tax for the sensors on the winter tires and work perfectly. Last week I put OEM tires back and the light is on again. My 21 yrs young Honda Civic DX has virtually zero electronics not a problem for me since I bought it brand new. The only electronics is the radio. No ABS, no power windows and doors, no air conditioning, no CD bluetooth anything, I never have problem with that. Especially the gas pedal is directly connected to the engine throat thru a cable, instant response. The Q50's throat is controlled by computer, very sluggish despite it has 325hp and the Civic 1.7L only has 105hp. The Civic's heater is controlled by knob directly turn up or down the amount of wind from the heat exchanger, the Q50's temperature is controlled by computer again. I test-drove the Sienna minivan, it is hybrid. I even can not control the engine. The computer controls the engine, turns it on and off. The fun of drive a mechanical car is over. Automakers sell many features unnecessary to customers, nowadays cars are so expensive.
 
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