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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got done doing the water pump and timing belt in my 1999 Toyota Camry CE four cylinder, at which time I also replaced my pulley belts. Prior to doing this job I had noticed I was getting a squeal once in a while, but nothing too bad that didn't go away once I started driving.

After completing the job I see two things are happening. First is whenever I turn my wheel, even the slightest bit, I'm getting an awful loud squeal, and at the same time my power steering pump is actually halting during the squeal.

The pulley belt isn't too tight, nor is it too loose, the fluid is full, and I don't see any leaks. Oddly enough, or coincidentally you might say, I did find a big crack in my air intake which had to have been there for a long time, so I took it off since I'll be replacing it later with a new one. I'm not sure if the squeal, which has gotten exponentially worse since the belt was replaced, would have really been this bad before I took the air intake off....

Unfortunately I did not have time to test if there was any relationship between the air intake being off and the power steering squealing like crazy, but I know it wasn't squealing this bad before I replaced the belt, nowhere even near this bad. Could the air intake being completely off have something to do with the power steering pump acting up?
 

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What color is the ps fluid? Ever been changed? Old fluid leads to problems ...
 

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I'm almost betting there is too much slack and or oil on the belt. Every time when I do the belts in these, the power steering one is always the pain to tension down correctly. I highly doubt it's too tight. I'm always having issues having it tight enough!

I'm trying to find a picture on where you can use as leverage to apply enough belt tention, but I can't find the picture on TN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm almost betting there is too much slack and or oil on the belt. Every time when I do the belts in these, the power steering one is always the pain to tension down correctly. I highly doubt it's too tight. I'm always having issues having it tight enough!

I'm trying to find a picture on where you can use as leverage to apply enough belt tention, but I can't find the picture on TN.
Darn, how tight must it be?
 

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I just got done doing the water pump and timing belt in my 1999 Toyota Camry CE four cylinder, at which time I also replaced my pulley belts. Prior to doing this job I had noticed I was getting a squeal once in a while, but nothing too bad that didn't go away once I started driving.

After completing the job I see two things are happening. First is whenever I turn my wheel, even the slightest bit, I'm getting an awful loud squeal, and at the same time my power steering pump is actually halting during the squeal.

The pulley belt isn't too tight, nor is it too loose, the fluid is full, and I don't see any leaks. Oddly enough, or coincidentally you might say, I did find a big crack in my air intake which had to have been there for a long time, so I took it off since I'll be replacing it later with a new one. I'm not sure if the squeal, which has gotten exponentially worse since the belt was replaced, would have really been this bad before I took the air intake off....

Unfortunately I did not have time to test if there was any relationship between the air intake being off and the power steering squealing like crazy, but I know it wasn't squealing this bad before I replaced the belt, nowhere even near this bad. Could the air intake being completely off have something to do with the power steering pump acting up?
On my uncle's '95 5S-FE, the valve cover oil leak left the power steering pump covered. Degreased after timing belt job and installed a new Bando belt, but it wasn't tight enough and I got similar symptoms. It would squeal loudly and slip; when it slipped, the steering wheel would get real tough to turn for a second. I ended up using a crowbar precariously wedged against the pump to tension it better (still not perfect, read on), and now it never slips enough to lose power steering, but squeals on cold startup. Goes away once everything is warm.

Like Kingdom said, I'm sure I saw a pic somewhere of someone using a crowbar and a floor jack to apply tension...
 

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Yeah... my money is on the belt not being tight enough. Last time I changed belts, it was all I could do laying on my back under the car with a pry bar in one hand and a ratchet in the other to get the belt tight, then tighten the adjustment bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just got done doing the water pump and timing belt in my 1999 Toyota Camry CE four cylinder, at which time I also replaced my pulley belts. Prior to doing this job I had noticed I was getting a squeal once in a while, but nothing too bad that didn't go away once I started driving.

After completing the job I see two things are happening. First is whenever I turn my wheel, even the slightest bit, I'm getting an awful loud squeal, and at the same time my power steering pump is actually halting during the squeal.

The pulley belt isn't too tight, nor is it too loose, the fluid is full, and I don't see any leaks. Oddly enough, or coincidentally you might say, I did find a big crack in my air intake which had to have been there for a long time, so I took it off since I'll be replacing it later with a new one. I'm not sure if the squeal, which has gotten exponentially worse since the belt was replaced, would have really been this bad before I took the air intake off....

Unfortunately I did not have time to test if there was any relationship between the air intake being off and the power steering squealing like crazy, but I know it wasn't squealing this bad before I replaced the belt, nowhere even near this bad. Could the air intake being completely off have something to do with the power steering pump acting up?
On my uncle's '95 5S-FE, the valve cover oil leak left the power steering pump covered. Degreased after timing belt job and installed a new Bando belt, but it wasn't tight enough and I got similar symptoms. It would squeal loudly and slip; when it slipped, the steering wheel would get real tough to turn for a second. I ended up using a crowbar precariously wedged against the pump to tension it better (still not perfect, read on), and now it never slips enough to lose power steering, but squeals on cold startup. Goes away once everything is warm.

Like Kingdom said, I'm sure I saw a pic somewhere of someone using a crowbar and a floor jack to apply tension...
Yeah... my money is on the belt not being tight enough. Last time I changed belts, it was all I could do laying on my back under the car with a pry bar in one hand and a ratchet in the other to get the belt tight, then tighten the adjustment bolt.
Thank you all so much for the reassurance. That takes some stress off the mind, I thought maybe I overtorqued a bearing or the balancer and didn't have enough engine power or something...

I'll definitely be tightening that belt up next chance I get.

Car jack and pry bar placed just right sounds like a plan!
 

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A little digging and I found something close.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/1...power-steering-whine-edges-7.html#post3518030

Basically you'll going to either have to do the method outline there or use a crow bar. There are two bolts holding the pump in. The upper bolt (this hold it to the block) and another bolt that is view able with the passenger wheel removed. This is the adjustment bolt. If you need to tension the belt, you might want to loosen the upper bolt just a little and loosen the adjustment bolt enough where you can adjust the pump by hand. Next, either do what is mention in the thread above or get a second pair of hands (having an assistant is very helpful) to apply enough tension downwards using a crow bar to tighten the adjustment bolt. Once that is god, tighten both bolts down.

This always gets me when I remove the belts on the V6 1MZFE. The 5S looks like the same as well.
 

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had no idea the p/s belt needed to be that tight. is this to make up for a worn out belt or something.
tony
Not really. I've had new belts do the same. It's kind of difficult getting good leverage in getting the belt tension enough. Alternator belts are easy because there is an adjustment bolt that applies tension. Then, you gotta push downward on the PS bump while tightening the adjustment bolt after the correct tension is applied. Kind of difficult w/ two hands lol.
 

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yeah, i'm used to either an adjustment bolt or a spring loaded tensioner pulley. i thought i was done with prybars as belt tightening tools when i sold the 63 impala....:)
tony
 

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yeah, i'm used to either an adjustment bolt or a spring loaded tensioner pulley. i thought i was done with prybars as belt tightening tools when i sold the 63 impala....:)
tony

Lol Oh man you'll have fun working on your camry if you remove the power steering belt :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
had no idea the p/s belt needed to be that tight. is this to make up for a worn out belt or something.
tony
A little digging and I found something close.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/1...power-steering-whine-edges-7.html#post3518030

Basically you'll going to either have to do the method outline there or use a crow bar. There are two bolts holding the pump in. The upper bolt (this hold it to the block) and another bolt that is view able with the passenger wheel removed. This is the adjustment bolt. If you need to tension the belt, you might want to loosen the upper bolt just a little and loosen the adjustment bolt enough where you can adjust the pump by hand. Next, either do what is mention in the thread above or get a second pair of hands (having an assistant is very helpful) to apply enough tension downwards using a crow bar to tighten the adjustment bolt. Once that is god, tighten both bolts down.

This always gets me when I remove the belts on the V6 1MZFE. The 5S looks like the same as well.
It was my first ever timing belt water pump install. Was a success, but I should have replaced a very small seal under one of the cogs on the bottom half of the motor, probably the size of a nickle or a little smaller. It was wet, but I figure with 116,000 miles, it'll last to 200,00 with only minor seepage, at which Time I'll Change the timing belt again.

I tried to unbolt the cog, but the leverage needed, and the correct tool, just wasn't in my immediate grasp. All the other seals looked good. I just had to get this thing done before going back to work. I could have done something about the timing cover gaskets too, the rubber was at least half gone. Se la vi. I Appreciate all the responses here.
 

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It was my first ever timing belt water pump install. Was a success, but I should have replaced a very small seal under one of the cogs on the bottom half of the motor, probably the size of a nickle or a little smaller. It was wet, but I figure with 116,000 miles, it'll last to 200,00 with only minor seepage, at which Time I'll Change the timing belt again.

I tried to unbolt the cog, but the leverage needed, and the correct tool, just wasn't in my immediate grasp. All the other seals looked good. I just had to get this thing done before going back to work. I could have done something about the timing cover gaskets too, the rubber was at least half gone. Se la vi. I Appreciate all the responses here.
Cool, 5S-FE being non-interference, I think its timing belt job is a good starting point. I'm guessing you meant the oil pump shaft seal - I use a large pair of channel locks to prevent the sprocket from turning and an impact driver to get the nut loose.

I just do all the seals when doing a timing belt job on that engine (camshaft, oil pump shaft, oil pump o-ring, crankshaft, new water pump w/housing because the Aisin OEM kit isn't that bad from RockAuto). Watch out for that seepage, oil will cause a timing belt failure. Oh, this tool: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OC94H8...qid=1471980215&sr=sr-1&keywords=aven+camshaft

...is what I use to install the cam seal, works a lot better than PVC pipe and a 2x4 :grin:.

EDIT: if you have the older (I think gen3) rubber timing cover gaskets, I recently tried the Beck/Arnley set (P/N: 0380241) from RockAuto. It worked great, and at $23, was a lot cheaper than the $110 I spent at the dealer last time I did a '95. I think the gen4 uses sticky-backed neoprene-y gasket material, much cheaper from the dealer (I want to say I paid $25 for a set).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Not too worried about the belt or seal or timing cover gasket to blow 25 bucks or whatever. I've seen original timing belts with 200k plus, and oil everywhere. I'll do my timing again in 90k or so anyway...after learning how easy it was.
 

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OP, is this a similar sound that you had? mine only does this on this type of right turns, noticed only after i swapped out the power steering fluid about february 2016. power steering tank has a small leak, refill every 2-3 months.

 

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OP, FWIW, is it tight enough? Is there any oil or grease on the belt? Is it the correct belt? In the over 50 years I've been beating on cars and they've been beating on me, more than one time has the parts counter guy given me a wrong or defective part.
 

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I'm accumulating the parts I need to replace the front crank seal and the two cam seals on my 2000 V6 Solara. Last time I did the timing belt replacement I noticed the power steering pump was pretty oily. The fluid certainly needs replacing. Do I need to drain the old fluid via one of the lines or can I do a partial replace by suctioning the fluid from the reservoir? I don't have any squeals as per the OP bu the gunk on the outside of the pump might indicate a leak.

It seems like there is something else that's stable and unbreakable in the vicinity of the pump that allows using a long screwdriver to keep the belt tight while you tighten the bolts.
 

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I'm accumulating the parts I need to replace the front crank seal and the two cam seals on my 2000 V6 Solara. Last time I did the timing belt replacement I noticed the power steering pump was pretty oily. The fluid certainly needs replacing. Do I need to drain the old fluid via one of the lines or can I do a partial replace by suctioning the fluid from the reservoir? I don't have any squeals as per the OP bu the gunk on the outside of the pump might indicate a leak.

It seems like there is something else that's stable and unbreakable in the vicinity of the pump that allows using a long screwdriver to keep the belt tight while you tighten the bolts.
You can drain the power steering fluid by disconnecting one of the power steering lines. The line between the reservoir to the pump is a dealer only line and might break when you disconnect that line. This line may also need to be removed if your having problem with having enough space or you can disconnect the return line from the metal line. The return line is a one piece but you can replace with a generic rubber hose if they should break. It will fit OK...not perfect.

Of the 4 times I found the power steering pump soaked for me, it was always the high pressure hose leaking...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/1...-did-my-ps-high-pressure-hose-my-1998-v6.html

I got a picture of the PS reservoir big hose. That is one you can try disconnect but depending on your condition, it may break. If not, you can try disconnect the return line (smaller one) from the reservoir. That one will probably snap and you can use a generic rubber hose to get it to fit 80% right (and work). If you want genuine, you need to order the entire line which starts from the rack. Don't know why we can't order JUST the rubber hoses...
 
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