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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This new clutch install on this 5fse Camry was done under pretty crappy conditions. Notice how the driveway is a pretty steep ramp for one, not a big help to have the car at such an angle but it was the only work area I had practical use of. I also had no professional tools like a transmission jack or lift, just a floor jack and a couple of jack stands, wrenches and socket sets. I thought that it might make some feel better if it could be done this way then it could be done anywhere by almost anyone.

The old clutch disk was worn down so there was only .2 mm, two-tenths of a millimeter over the rivet heads, so it was close to catastrophe.

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The end of the tranny fit right into the fender well without bending anything, I know some say you will have to bend something to get it to move over far enough but I don't know why they say this, after you have the tranny loose and supported you can move it right over as shown enough to get the job done easily.
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My only "trick" which I did not see anyone else do was to use TWO separate support bars, one for the engine and one for the gearbox, I did this because I noticed that the transmission needed to be supported on a different center-line than the engine, if I would have hung it on my chains off the same bar the engine was hanging on it would NOT have slid into the fender well in the right spot or have been as easy to line up when it was time to put things back together. This way you can move the transmission bar side to side and up and down without moving the engine and have an advantage in lining things up!
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So I slid the tranny over, cleaned all the dust out of it with a brush and some kerosene and rags AND compressed air, wear a mask and have a breeze so you do not breath any old clutch dust, I doubt if it is good for you. The flywheel looked fine so I roughed it up good with some 80-grit sandpaper, cleaned it and the new disk and pressure-plate off with Acetone and bolted it back together using the centering tool that was part of the Aisin clutch kit. I was careful to wiggle the centering tool around a bit to center it up as well as possible before tightening a few pressure-plate bolts to freeze it in place, then of course tightened the bolts all up in a cross pattern as suggested by Aisin.

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The biggest trick to getting the transmission back on is to have it perfectly lined up and cleaned, and put some never-seize on the dowel pins. It helps to have a lot of mechanical experience, a lot of brains and a lot of patience, but I think patience is the most important asset you can have for this job. Just relax, fiddle with the chains and bar etc. and get that sucker lined up perfectly and slowly move it back home. It will get stuck until the splines are lined up so they can engage, and you may have to walk away and come back the next day or later to fiddle with it enough. You will have to rotate the flywheel a bit along with putting pressure on the back of the gearbox and wiggling it a little, and just when you are ready to scrap the car it will slide into place, then you will have to pry and wiggle it a little more to get the dowel pins to go in their holes. But it will happen with that patience we were talking about, and you WILL get that first bolt in, then the rest will fall like dominoes and go right in.

I had bolts holding the chains together under the gearbox, and now and then I would have the tranny supported by the jack and tighten or loosen the chains to get things level, you can also slide the chains around to tilt the gearbox, stick things between the chain and the bar etc.. I had a nice two-by four as a pry bar, and other pry-bars of various sorts. It would have helped to have three or four arms and three legs too. It would have been NICE to have two floor jacks instead of one.

My last "trick" was pulling BOTH axles. You have enough to do just getting the gearbox lined up and back on without fiddling with getting that stupid passenger-side axle back in too. It really needs to come out and be checked and cleaned anyway right? Get it out of the way and make it easy on yourself, especially if you are working alone as I do.

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After that you can put the transmission mount back in and lower everything so it is supported on the frame rail and you can take off the chains etc. and put them in a dark corner so you will not have to look at them again for hopefully a long, long time.

I am sure this car had it's original clutch etc. with only 75K on it. I could notice that the original throwout bearing was of higher quality than the Koyo in the Aisin kit, it was heavier made and just looked better. I of course saved all the parts to use again in the future at some point.
I bought the recommended grease to use on the throwout arm pivot after making it surgically clean.

This was the first manual gearbox/clutch work I did since the 1980s when I worked on my 73' z28 and my 73' Trans-Am! But it was no big deal because I had a pdf of the factory service manual, and I have never stopped working on motorcycles and every car I ever owned, so if you use it you never lose it.

Ideally it would be great to have a smooth level floor to work on and a transmission jack or support, those things would greatly speed up the job, as would any number of other professional garage luxuries, but I was not in a hurry, and I probably did a better job than any pro shop would do because they are always in a big hurry and they certainly would not have taken the time I did with the cleaning, and pro-shops have a habit of losing OEM fastners here and there and just not doing as good a job as someone who owns the car will do because they care about something besides MONEY.
 

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1995 T100 2WD & 1993 MR2
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Thanks for taking the time to write this up and include pics too. This will help someone alot down the road.(y)
 

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Thank you for chocking your wheels at least!

I've replaced the trans in an MR2 Spyder with just a regular jack by myself. I have also replaced trans on Humvees by myself without a jack (Thank the maker ratchet straps exist) and it is NOT fun. Also, I recognize that red handle pry bar! I have one myself that I may or may not have tactically acquired from my last unit.

I will point out that in your second picture your suspension is VERY rusty. For a car with only 75k miles that is a lot of surface damage on those components. I would recommend replacing your shocks at least soon and spray them with a bedliner type to protect the mounts.
 
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I will point out that in your second picture your suspension is VERY rusty. For a car with only 75k miles. I would recommend
LOL Mileage has Nothing to do with rust, it is the climate the car is exposed to x the time it has been exposed, and this is the snow-belt on the south-shore of Lake Erie where there is road-salt in the winter and high humidity in the summer.

Since you like recommending, my recommendation to myself is going to be not to recommend what you and others do with your time since I don't know JACK about what else your car might need that has a higher priority, if you have a house to maintain, a demanding job, elderly parents to take care of, how many other cars you have to work on that might have priority etc.... There you go....
 

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LOL Mileage has Nothing to do with rust, it is the climate the car is exposed to x the time it has been exposed, and this is the snow-belt on the south-shore of Lake Erie where there is road-salt in the winter and high humidity in the summer.

Since you like recommending, I would recommend not recommending what other people need to do with their time since you are not them and don't know if they maybe own a house to maintain, many other vehicles, elderly parents to care for, are working construction and have a life etc. There you go......
Way to be an ass. Never said you HAD to do anything. And cool, you have a life. Takes about 40 minutes to do both sets of shocks. A hell of a lot less time than your clutch job took.

Low mileage means it hasn't gone far. Unless this was driven only in the winter and never washed, that is a lot of damage for it's mileage. So yes, mileage matters in this case.

If you REALLY cared about elderly parents and working your job, getting to and from safely should be top priority. I only made a suggestion for your own safety. But you choose to get defensive for whatever reason. Do you feel attacked or something?
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Way to be an ass.
Psssssst. FYI this project car has never been on the road since I bought it a short time ago. So make sure you assume you know more about other people and their cars than they do, whle you are hijacking threads with brilliant suggestions like "Rust bad, must fix, duhhhhhh".
 

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Hardly a thread hijack, he was just making a suggestion. Relaaaaax.

...maybe this one too (not saying you have a double chin, but to prevent):

Good job getting the clutch done.
 

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Has time for a project car, doesn't have time to make sure project car is safe. Logic.
 

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93 Camry DX 2.2L 5sp manual 149K
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Nortonguy,
Thanks for your post. Good pictures and ideas. I may be doing this job too because of a rear main seal. My clutch is working fine, but while I am in there, might as well.
 

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Cool you aren’t the first to do a clutch in a driveway I have done it lol I don’t have a transmission jack either at home just at the shop it would of been helpful for sure though I just used some regular jack stands to set it on. I did mine with all hand tools too because at the time I didn’t have any power or air tools it was an adventure for sure lol but at least I had experience doing clutches before though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nortonguy,
Thanks for your post. Good pictures and ideas. I may be doing this job too because of a rear main seal. My clutch is working fine, but while I am in there, might as well.
My old clutch disk was about .250" thick and that took it very close to the rivets !!! The new Aisin disk was only about .075" thicker than the old disk, so there is only 75 thousandths of an inch difference between having a new clutch and one that is slipping. I could drive my car the way it was, but if I tried to floor it in a high gear the disk would slip badly. I was lucky I did not get that small fraction of a millimeter down to the rivets and screw up my flywheel. So you are right about throwing at least a new disk in there. I could have used my old pressure-plate and throwout bearing as they were in great shape too and looked to be better quality than the new Aisin/Koyo components, but I will just store them away for the next clutch job.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cool you aren’t the first to do a clutch in a driveway I have done it lol I don’t have a transmission jack either at home just at the shop it would of been helpful for sure though I just used some regular jack stands to set it on. I did mine with all hand tools too because at the time I didn’t have any power or air tools it was an adventure for sure lol but at least I had experience doing clutches before though.
I never use power tools. In the factory service manual for the 4th gen Camry Toyota actually warns against using power impact tools on some jobs. And we have all seen screwed up threads from dummies using power tools to drive home nuts and bolts. I had to replace ALL the lug-nuts on a Camry once that only had 50K on it because someone screwed them up so badly overtorqueing them with an impact, it was sad.

I do all my jobs at a walking pace and do them right or don't do them at all. Before I put my axles back in I wire-wheeled the rusty spots they had and primered and painted them. Lots left to do on the car, but it is just a fun project ride and I will enjoy slowly going over it and making it all right.
 

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I never use power tools. In the factory service manual for the 4th gen Camry Toyota actually warns against using power impact tools on some jobs. And we have all seen screwed up threads from dummies using power tools to drive home nuts and bolts. I had to replace ALL the lug-nuts on a Camry once that only had 50K on it because someone screwed them up so badly overtorqueing them with an impact, it was sad.

I do all my jobs at a walking pace and do them right or don't do them at all. Before I put my axles back in I wire-wheeled the rusty spots they had and primered and painted them. Lots left to do on the car, but it is just a fun project ride and I will enjoy slowly going over it and making it all right.
You are exactly right we have all seen them on my dads Camry he had Sam’s club do his tires and they drove the lug nuts all the way down with the impact didn’t even hand tighten them first and I went to take off the tire to do the brakes and the stud snapped. At my shop we are not allowed to use impacts on axle nuts, brakes, or anything on the interior of the car or starters or alternators if we are caught using them we are fired on the spot no questions asked. And I won’t do it because the guy in the bay next to me is a snitch so nobody could get away with it anyway. I prefer using all hand tools anyway I much more enjoy doing it with hand tools rather than power or air tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
if we are caught using them we are fired on the spot no questions asked.
You are lucky to work at a garage where they want to pay the guys the money and time to do things right with wrenches and ratchets. I think it is one out of a hundred garages that actually give a shit about anything but the money, the rest of them range from being ignorant to outright criminals. In Pennsylvania everyone has to go to a garage and get their vehicles safety inspected each year, and it is a real racket for the garages as if there is nothing wrong with the vehicle they will invent something that is wrong with it anyway just so they can make the cash. I have seen them get caught by the State Police fraud unit doing this, I have seen them first-hand say that a car needed a new engine when the engine was fine, say parts were bad that were perfect and do work so poorly and incompetently on my own vehicle that it was literally dangerous for me to drive it home after the fact.

This is why I always do all of my own repairs if it is at all possible. I think exhaust work is about the only thing most garages can regularly handle with some minimum sort of competence at all.
 

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You are lucky to work at a garage where they want to pay the guys the money and time to do things right with wrenches and ratchets. I think it is one out of a hundred garages that actually give a shit about anything but the money, the rest of them range from being ignorant to outright criminals. In Pennsylvania everyone has to go to a garage and get their vehicles safety inspected each year, and it is a real racket for the garages as if there is nothing wrong with the vehicle they will invent something that is wrong with it anyway just so they can make the cash. I have seen them get caught by the State Police fraud unit doing this, I have seen them first-hand say that a car needed a new engine when the engine was fine, say parts were bad that were perfect and do work so poorly and incompetently on my own vehicle that it was literally dangerous for me to drive it home after the fact.

This is why I always do all of my own repairs if it is at all possible. I think exhaust work is about the only thing most garages can regularly handle with some minimum sort of competence at all.
Yep I work at a dealership our new boss cares a lot they fired the old one for screaming at a customer who had a question about her car and he done it in the waiting room and had over 100 complaints including from all the mechanics, salesman and customers and the district manager showed up 30 minutes later and had him sign his walking papers he couldn’t believe it That he had been fired and said he was only doing it to motivate the workers to do better so that wouldn’t happen to them he really didn’t care for customer service as you can tell. The new boss doesn’t allow anything like that to happen and insured that nothing like that would ever happen again as long as he was manager the one who they were going to promote to manager got hurt by having a cherry picker chain snap on him and hit him in the shoulder. We do inspections here in Virginia also and they are very strict on them but we don’t rip people off sometimes we will tell them if the part is getting worn like for example brake pads or something but we won’t force them to replace them right then.
 
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