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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Checking Oil Dipstick
  1. Park on relatively even ground
  2. Key ON, Engine ON for a couple of seconds
  3. Key OFF
  4. Remove dipstick
  5. Clean dipstick
  6. Insert dipstick
  7. Remove dipstick
  8. Check dipstick
  9. Clean dipstick
  10. Insert dipstick
  11. Done!
Sleeve Wood Rectangle Electric blue Font


Checking Automatic Transmission Fluid Dipstick
  1. Go on a long drive
  2. Park on relatively even ground
  3. Key ON, Engine ON
  4. Remove dipstick
  5. Clean dipstick
  6. Insert dipstick
  7. Remove dipstick
  8. Check dipstick
  9. Clean dipstick
  10. Insert dipstick
  11. Repeat steps 1 - 10 or 2 - 10 until satisfied
  12. Done!
Sleeve Wood Cap Grey Denim


Clean Throttle Body & Mass Air Flow Sensor
  1. Buy mass air flow sensor (MAF) cleaner, throttle body (TB) cleaner, cloth, and a toothbrush
  2. Key OFF
  3. Remove MAF
  4. Spray MAF cleaner into MAF
  5. Allow MAF to dry
  6. Remove intake hose's needed to reach TB
  7. Have someone assist you or place an heavy object on the accelerator pedal
    1. This will actuate the butterfly valve open to allow
  8. Spray TB cleaner into TB
    1. Do NOT spray too much TB cleaner or you could cause damage to your engine
  9. Brush & wipe throttle body
  10. Reinstall
  11. Unhook battery for more than 90 seconds
  12. Attempt to start the vehicle
  13. Attempt to start the vehicle again
  14. Let vehicle sit at idle
  15. Take vehicle for test drive
  16. Done!
Coolant Bleeding
  1. Park on relatively even ground
  2. Attach no-spill coolant funnel
  3. Fill funnel to half-full
  4. Make sure HVAC/Heat/Fan is OFF
  5. Key ON, Engine ON
  6. Watch the coolant in the funnel
  7. Add coolant as needed
  8. Watch for bubbles
  9. Use a steering wheel lock, stick, 2x4, some sort of long or heavy object and use it to depress the accelerator pedal and give the engine some load (2000rpm - 3000rpm is what I go for)
  10. Add coolant as needed
  11. Watch for bubbles
  12. Repeat steps 10 - 11 until satisfied
  13. Wait for fan to turn on
  14. Release the accelerator pedal
  15. Repeat steps 10 - 11 until satisfied
  16. Wait for fan to turn on
  17. Done!
Preparing For Emissions Testing
  1. Check codes
  2. Note the codes down
  3. Clear the codes
  4. Go on a nice and long drive to get the catalytic converter hot
  5. Have more than 1/4 fuel and less than 3/4 in the fuel tank to let the EVAP run its test over night (or more than five hours)
  6. Check codes
  7. Check readiness monitors
  8. Done!
Vehicle Response When Cold
  1. Hard shifting
  2. Higher idle
 

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Procedure for checking if air filter needs replaced or if it's still aok?
I am needing to do that before heading west
 

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2008 Toyota Camry Base / CE
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Procedure for checking if air filter needs replaced or if it's still aok?
I am needing to do that before heading west
If it looks dirty, replace it.
 

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2004 Solara SLE Convertible, 3.3 V6
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Checking Oil Dipstick
  1. Park on relatively even ground
  2. Key ON, Engine ON for a couple of seconds
  3. Key OFF
I'm curious what your rationale is for running the engine for a couple of seconds?

Every "official manual" I've ever read for any marque specifies that all oil should be allowed to drain into the sump before checking levels. Most specify checking either before the car has been run or no sooner than 10 minutes after having parked to allow it to drain back into the sump.

Other than your steps 2 & 3 I've been following the remaining steps, with those two omitted, for as long as I've been checking oil levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm curious what your rationale is for running the engine for a couple of seconds?

Every "official manual" I've ever read for any marque specifies that all oil should be allowed to drain into the sump before checking levels. Most specify checking either before the car has been run or no sooner than 10 minutes after having parked to allow it to drain back into the sump.

Other than your steps 2 & 3 I've been following the remaining steps, with those two omitted, for as long as I've been checking oil levels.
Just is what I learned when I still worked in thr shop. That is not to say I meant to check immediately after the engine turns off. It's just to allow the oil to flow a bit before settling into the pan prior to checking. It don't matter whether that is 10 minutes, 5 minutes, 1 minute, or a whole day.
 

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It's just to allow the oil to flow a bit before settling into the pan prior to checking. It don't matter whether that is 10 minutes, 5 minutes, 1 minute, or a whole day.
I'm really not trying to be argumentative here, but your "a whole day" comment pretty much circles back to my question.

Once a engine has been turned off (and the oil has been flowing plenty when driving) it will all (or very nearly all) flow back into the sump once parked on level ground. That's why those two steps are truly unnecessary. And if you were to check one minute after turning the car off, the draining back to the sump may very well not yet be complete. Longer is better as far as waiting for the oil to drain, but after it's drained, that's enough.

But we agree on all else.
 
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I don't agree on the air Filter bit... If it 'looks' dirty 😕
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't agree on the air Filter bit... If it 'looks' dirty 😕
Mine is a pod filter. This thread is really on here so I can be consistent with my post relating to those procedures.
 

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I don't agree on the air Filter bit... If it 'looks' dirty 😕
Why not?

I've never seen an air filter manufacturer that doesn't give their suggested change interval, typically expressed in miles and/or months, on their packaging. But all of them note that if you have been driving in particularly dusty conditions the need will be more frequent.

And those filters, even under normal service, tend to "look dirty" compared to a fresh one. If the miles on the current one are unknown, and it doesn't look "almost like a new one," then replace it with a new one and start paying attention to your miles/months/ and driving conditions to determine your change interval.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Added pictures. Yes I know I am overfilled I am always over filled but I also know I definitely did not use all 5qt from the jug and I definitely did not use an additional 5qt jug. So it's not a big deal to me.
 
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