Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have a 2007 Camry LE V6 and just took it to the dealer for an oil change and brake inspection, since I noticed that the wheels where shaking a bit on the freeway, when I'd press the brakes. Turned out that the rotors were warped and a "push-pin" wasn't moving well. So they replaced the brake-pads and re-surfaced the rotor.
Does anyone else think that they should have replaced the rotors instead of resurfacing it?
The dealer processed the service under the warranty, but I'm not comfortable having "RE-FURBISHED" parts in my car at these low miles....
any comments would be appreciated....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
I would not worry about it especially having a new car warranty. I would say 'on-vehicle' rotor turning is the industry standard for rotor repair.
My $.02
 

·
TN Pussy Man
Camry
Joined
·
13,302 Posts
^ I would agree

replacement of rotors is the last step that they would take

we would regularly just replace them, but that's because with hookups or knowing places with cheap aftermarket rotors and no access to a resurfacer, it's not that much more to just replace them

I'd be more concerned about what they did about the sticky pin, since if it wasn't dealt with, you'll end up having the same problems again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I still think they should replace the rotors, because there's was something wrong with the vehicle and it still is under warranty. Resurfaced rotors reduces time until rotor replacement is required.
 

·
ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
·
368 Posts
Resurfacing rotors is considered to be "normal and customary" in order to restore proper function. That's the mandate, and it's not necessarily required to install "new" parts with no mileage wear.

If it's any consolation, I dealt with this "brake pulsation" problem when I worked in the toyota dealership on brand new, 1994 Camrys. I have also treated this on virtually every other type of car on the road that has rotors.

Don't sweat it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Im surprised they even replaced your pads. Rotor resurfacing is common practice for warranty brake vibration. Rotor runout is typically driver induced anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
green91 said:
Rotor runout is typically driver induced anyway.
Often because of over-torqued wheel lugs too. Tire shops will often way-over torque. This problem at 16k miles seems unusual though ... this car is still new !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
It would surprise you how many tundras, 4runners and tacomas ive done warranty brake maching on. Its primarily from automatics, alot of it is caused by stopping and getting the brakes hot and then holding the brakes for a period at red lights, it causes the area within the pads to cool at a slower rate than the rest of the rotor and causes runout. after this happens a few times youve got a pretty nice vibration on your hands
 

·
ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
·
368 Posts
That's right.

I used to see a lot of overtorqued nuts, but many shops have either taken to hand-torquing the nuts or using a torque stick on the impact gun to prevent that kind of rotor/wheel distortion.

It's nice to have an on-car lathe to refinish the rotors, but many shops that already have a traditional lathe don't want to spend the money. The on-car is good because it takes hub runout into account while truing the plane of rotation of the disc. That runout is easy to mess up on a traditional lathe merely by not properly mounting the rotor on the lathe shaft.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top