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M

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Discussion Starter #1
We just bought a '95 LE four wagon. The timing belt was done
at 63k miles, but we see no receipt for water pump replacement.
It has 108k miles on it now. If this is the original water pump,
can we reasonably expect it to last until Spring, say another 5k
miles?
 
D

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Discussion Starter #2
mjc<DELETETHIS>13 wrote:
> We just bought a '95 LE four wagon. The timing belt was done
> at 63k miles, but we see no receipt for water pump replacement.
> It has 108k miles on it now. If this is the original water pump,
> can we reasonably expect it to last until Spring, say another 5k
> miles?

=============================
Recommended replacement interval for timing belts on your engine is
60,000 miles.
If you have been using Toyota coolant and distilled water, the water
pump should be fine until 120,000 miles. Generally with a Toyota water
pump, the failure mode will begin with weeping at the seal so you would
have advance notice.
 
J
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Discussion Starter #3
Water pump usually fail slowly. It first starts leaking coolant, and
then the corrosion takes out the bearing. So if the car isn't using
coolant and you don't have air in the radiator, it should be fine for
now.

Some mechanics skip the water pump every other timing belt change if it
turns smoothly and doesn't appear to be leaking at the 60K interval.
But some Toyota pumps, well maintained with OEM coolant and distilled
water, would start leaking coolant and giving the frequent "mysterious
coolant use" problem many have posted about. I have seen both.

My take is that the 4 cyl pump is about $35 (Beck Arnley,
www.rockauto.com) to $57 (Aisin, the OEM pump). Toyota or the new
Prestone Extended Life coolant and distilled water no more than $15.
Just change it every time you do the timing belt, because it takes 3-4
hours to get at the pump at the book rate.


mjc<DELETETHIS>13 wrote:
> We just bought a '95 LE four wagon. The timing belt was done
> at 63k miles, but we see no receipt for water pump replacement.
> It has 108k miles on it now. If this is the original water pump,
> can we reasonably expect it to last until Spring, say another 5k
> miles?
 
M

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Discussion Starter #4
Daniel wrote:
> mjc<DELETETHIS>13 wrote:
>
>>We just bought a '95 LE four wagon. The timing belt was done
>>at 63k miles, but we see no receipt for water pump replacement.
>>It has 108k miles on it now. If this is the original water pump,
>>can we reasonably expect it to last until Spring, say another 5k
>>miles?

>
> =============================
> Recommended replacement interval for timing belts on your engine is
> 60,000 miles.
> If you have been using Toyota coolant and distilled water, the water
> pump should be fine until 120,000 miles. Generally with a Toyota water
> pump, the failure mode will begin with weeping at the seal so you would
> have advance notice.
>



Thanks. We'd rather wait until Spring if it's safe to do so.
I doubt that Toyota coolant was used, though - the car was
serviced mainly at an indie shop.
 
S

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Discussion Starter #5
Water pump bearings make an awful squeel as they are failing. I drive
until this happens (or it's time for a timing belt replacement) and head
for the repair garage at that time.
Labor will far exceed the cost of the hardware. They will probably ask
for 2 hours at $80 each.


[email protected] wrote:
> Water pump usually fail slowly. It first starts leaking coolant, and
> then the corrosion takes out the bearing. So if the car isn't using
> coolant and you don't have air in the radiator, it should be fine for
> now.
>
> Some mechanics skip the water pump every other timing belt change if it
> turns smoothly and doesn't appear to be leaking at the 60K interval.
> But some Toyota pumps, well maintained with OEM coolant and distilled
> water, would start leaking coolant and giving the frequent "mysterious
> coolant use" problem many have posted about. I have seen both.
>
> My take is that the 4 cyl pump is about $35 (Beck Arnley,
> www.rockauto.com) to $57 (Aisin, the OEM pump). Toyota or the new
> Prestone Extended Life coolant and distilled water no more than $15.
> Just change it every time you do the timing belt, because it takes 3-4
> hours to get at the pump at the book rate.
>
>
> mjc<DELETETHIS>13 wrote:
>> We just bought a '95 LE four wagon. The timing belt was done
>> at 63k miles, but we see no receipt for water pump replacement.
>> It has 108k miles on it now. If this is the original water pump,
>> can we reasonably expect it to last until Spring, say another 5k
>> miles?

>
 

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wow, this a old post...my 95 Camry still has the original water pump and it has182,000 miles on it! I always use the Prestone classic green antifreeze + distilled water (never caused any problems since I bought the car in 1998) and I always flush the system with their super flush product every two years.
 

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4 Posts
No longer than a KIA

Water pump failed on '03 Camry with 70K miles on it. Not the worst part. Valve guides needed replacing. Told Toyota of Greenville that if I'd wanted to replace valve guides at 70K miles, I would have bought a KIA. Then the dumb bunny fails to say "Water pumps in Camrys can last 200K but sometimes fail at 100K." (A little white lie is okay with car dealers.) "Since we have the head off, why don't we replace the water pump." I would have replaced the water pump. The water pump had clearly failed either during the repair or prior to the repair. Leaking coolant when we got it back. Long diagnosis problem because car is now in NC with daughter. (She pretended she was Chad Knaus' neice and the dealer up there got right to it.) Toyota quality started to drop as its arrogance started to rise in about 2000, maybe a bit before. Love my '00 4Runner. "03 Camry has survived two teenagers, but I wouldn't buy a Toyota now (unless it was an '00 4Runner). And Toyota of Greenville is worse than the worst days of Ford dealerships.
 
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