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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a question. We had some welding done on our 86 ford crew
cab (on the brush guard). Our son took it to welding class at the high
school and the kids were suppose to get experience on it. The class
teacher insisted on doing the job. We now have pit's in our
windshield, the batteries wont hold a charge (duel), starter and
alternator not working properly. Our son said that he didn't disconect
the battery. I'm not sure where he grounded it. Is this proper or
should he have taken some procautions with it?? If anyone has any
questions or answers please let me know I would be greatful for
anything you can do for us.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
jordan wrote:

> Hi, I have a question. We had some welding done on our 86 ford crew
> cab (on the brush guard). Our son took it to welding class at the high
> school and the kids were suppose to get experience on it. The class
> teacher insisted on doing the job. We now have pit's in our
> windshield, the batteries wont hold a charge (duel), starter and
> alternator not working properly. Our son said that he didn't disconect
> the battery. I'm not sure where he grounded it. Is this proper or
> should he have taken some procautions with it?? If anyone has any
> questions or answers please let me know I would be greatful for
> anything you can do for us.
>


Sounds like an area got too hot from the welding and might have melted
through some wiring --- I would check the welded areas wiring harness
real good as that should have been insulted from the heat with a welders
blanket. Disconnecting the ground is good practice anytime electrical
work or major work is being done but I don't think that caused your
problems. Melted wires down to the wire touching the frame or another
wire would be suspect in my opinion. A check you could also do would be
to put an amp meter at the battery and see what kind of amperage is
being pulled with everything off. Should be very minor -- 100 ma or
less from things like a clock. More than 1 amp would be suspect. Hope
this helps.

J
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Look like the kids learned something. They learned not to send a 120amp
and 24 V welding charge through a trucks electrical system. ;)

mike hunt
"Joey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> jordan wrote:
>
>> Hi, I have a question. We had some welding done on our 86 ford crew
>> cab (on the brush guard). Our son took it to welding class at the high
>> school and the kids were suppose to get experience on it. The class
>> teacher insisted on doing the job. We now have pit's in our
>> windshield, the batteries wont hold a charge (duel), starter and
>> alternator not working properly. Our son said that he didn't disconect
>> the battery. I'm not sure where he grounded it. Is this proper or
>> should he have taken some procautions with it?? If anyone has any
>> questions or answers please let me know I would be greatful for
>> anything you can do for us.
>>

>
> Sounds like an area got too hot from the welding and might have melted
> through some wiring --- I would check the welded areas wiring harness real
> good as that should have been insulted from the heat with a welders
> blanket. Disconnecting the ground is good practice anytime electrical
> work or major work is being done but I don't think that caused your
> problems. Melted wires down to the wire touching the frame or another
> wire would be suspect in my opinion. A check you could also do would be
> to put an amp meter at the battery and see what kind of amperage is being
> pulled with everything off. Should be very minor -- 100 ma or less from
> things like a clock. More than 1 amp would be suspect. Hope this helps.
>
> J
 
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