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Hey Corollaers-

I removed my '07 LE's axle nut to get to the ball joint. Shiny new axle nut's going back on but I'm not sure what torque setting I should be applying. I've heard very different numbers from 159 ft lbs to 184 ft lbs. What's the right setting?
 

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Am I looking at the "axle spindle nut" number? Kind of confused because I keep hearing different-sounding names for this part which MIGHT be the same part, but might not. I've heard it get called: axle nut, axle spindle nut, axle hub nut, CV axle nut. At this point I can't be sure what the others are referring to.
 

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When I had a shop replace my axle they re used the original nut. When it was staked at torque it was on point and same spot at 159. Did the same job myself as the axle they replaced was too cheap and used new nut with 159. No problems at all.


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Torque it around 160 foot pounds and stake the nut. You will be fine.
Don't forget, most mechanics rarely use a torque wrench. They just go "tight"
Good luck
 

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Don't use an impact wrench. Tighten it by hand with a manual torque wrench.
 

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Torque it around 160 foot pounds and stake the nut. You will be fine.
Don't forget, most mechanics rarely use a torque wrench. They just go "tight"
Good luck
You are exactly right lol at my shop they would always drive the axle nut down with an impact and so now we are not allowed to use impacts on them since those people would damage them and they rarely ever stake the nut either
 

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You are exactly right lol at my shop they would always drive the axle nut down with an impact and so now we are not allowed to use impacts on them since those people would damage them and they rarely ever stake the nut either
The severity of the impact "shakes" the ball bearings in the bearing assembly and damages them, which results in the bearing assembly having a shorter lifespan than normal. That's one of the reasons not to use an impact on anything with ball bearings.

I have an old friend who is a retired mechanic. Worked for Toyota earlier in his career before he had his own shop. He said the Toyota mechanics used to use an air chisel to remove the C-shaped (or U-shaped) washer that would secure the parking brake cable to the pin on the drum brake shoes. They would get warranty comebacks and final figured out that the impact of the air chisel was deforming the shape of the brake shoe just enough to cause noise. With any tool that causes impact, you have to be careful and thoughtful before deciding to use it. They are great and convenient tools, but not always good for the job.
 
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The severity of the impact "shakes" the ball bearings in the bearing assembly and damages them, which results in the bearing assembly having a shorter lifespan than normal. That's one of the reasons not to use an impact on anything with ball bearings.
Yeah I never did personally and was always told not too but the younger guys at my shop love their air tools and try to use them for everything. One of them didn’t even know what staking the axle nut meant.
 

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I never used an impact to tighten anything as critical as an axle bearing nut. The impact load as radially applied in the same direction of rotation as the bearing. The bearing is doing nothing to accept the load from the impact. It's being applied to the pinion gear and spider gears in the differential, where the mass of the pinion itself is absorbing much of the impact.
I'm not arguing for the use of impact wrenches on axle bearings, but there are cases where they would be appropriate. For example when you have a nut so tight it can not be removed by any normal means. You want to save the axle but the bearing is being replaced anyway. One time we had to use the weight of the car to get a rear axle nut on a 280ZX removed, pry bar between the lug nits, breaker bar on the axle nut itself, then drop the car down on the lift until something moved. Reused the lower control arm and stub axle, replaced the bearing and seal.

Fixed a 1977 Honda Accord when it was a year old. Right wheel took the impact. Drove the strut tower into the unibody hard enough for the windshield to pop out of its weatherstrip, but not break. Even broke the heater housing inside the car. Replaced the strut, everything else was reused, front end aligned AND SOLD IT TO MY FATHER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Reinstalled the windshield, repaired the busted heater housing with a torch and an oyster knife.

Only the strut itself was bent. HE DROVE IT ANOTHER 50k miles without any problem with any part in that wheel, NOTHING was replaced in 50 k miles. He traded the car in and they gave him $2800 for the car with 63k miles. When you talk about impact on a bearing, that example takes the cake for me. We did replace the whole right side skirt, from the cowl to the radiator support, but no other suspension component except the strut itself, just the cartridge assembly.

Arguing hypotheticals is an exercise in ludicrous confrontations. POP had retired and worked as a volunteer for the American Cancer Society. They paid him 39 cents a mile and he averaged 39.5 MPG. This was a man who flew B17s home from missions over Germany with almost unbelievable battle damage, bombs dropped through the wing, one near miss from an 88 that left 175 holes in his plane and knocked him out cold in the pilots seat, when a piece of that 88 hit his helmet. It was hi first mission 12/24/43, supposedly a milk run to the French coast where they were building the launch ramps for the V1 buzz bombs. It took 3 planes to make his 30 missions, ending on D-Day 6/6/44.

Ever rolled a car around with no steering gear? They roll good forward, terrible backward, due to the caster in the front end.

I read almost daily, on this forum, about bearing replacements that failed in days. weeks, months after installation. I NEVER had a bearing failure like that and replaced hundreds of bearing from 1969 to 1999 when I retired, every configuration you could imagine. These days the bearings are made as an assembly, back then they were individual bearings with a spacer between them and seals separate. Never had one fail.
 

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