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TN's furry friend
1995 Toyota Camry LE
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Discussion Starter #1
i can hear the metal on the pads when the wheel turns now, so time for new pads. what brands are good, thinking about ordering some ceramic ones off of ebay. thanks.
 

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Camry
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6,925 Posts
I have Hawk HPS pads on my Camry right now.
But they are semi-metallic. They make ceramic pads also.

Does it make any difference whether ceramic or semi-metallic pads are used?
 

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I have used Raybestos "full ceramics" on both of my Camrys. (They also make a semi-ceramic pad which is part semi-metalic and part ceramic.) The full ceramics seem to be fine, but my cars are everyday drivers. I would not consider them performance pads. They do well in normal driving.

Mike
 

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Premium Member
'96 Camry XLE
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11,246 Posts
touringcamry said:
I have Hawk HPS pads on my Camry right now.
But they are semi-metallic. They make ceramic pads also.

Does it make any difference whether ceramic or semi-metallic pads are used?
:thumbup: I have the same. Hawk HPA Street Pads. They said they are supposed to squeak as they are not ceramic, but no squeaking in the 10k milesa I've had them on.

And like he said above, they now make ceramic ones.
 

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Dealer Tech..not Toyota
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540 Posts
whats in them makes the difference on squealing, temps...etc.
i like Bendix, but on occasion Raybestos, or Wearever are ok.
 

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ASG14 said:
:thumbup: I have the same. Hawk HPA Street Pads. They said they are supposed to squeak as they are not ceramic, but no squeaking in the 10k milesa I've had them on.

And like he said above, they now make ceramic ones.
I haven't had any problem with my HPS pads squeaking. I've had them on the vehicle for about 38k miles and they're about 1/2 done.
 

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tC
2007 Scion tC
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486 Posts
akebono proacts!!!! very little dust, no noise and long life.
 

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I run morse hi po ceramics on my Lincoln Town Car, and it greatly improved the stopping power over a brand new set of motorcraft pads. I wanted an improvement, and the new ford pads didn't cut the mustard, so I bought those and haven't had a squeak, and the boat stops real quick now.

I also have semi-metallics on my Triumph. Work great, but haven't seen a real difference with semi-metallic vs. ceramic in my driving. I have wilwood 6-piston calipers, so these aren't ancient crap calipers.

Good Luck,
GT6
 

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FLIP'N THE G-5 WHIP
2005 Black Camry
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895 Posts
that is what i will get.
 

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Where are we going today?
Camry 00/Corolla 19
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2,606 Posts
green stuff is pretty good also.. but slightly dusty.

i bought some ceramic pads from autozone, the good stuff.. cannot remember the name and it works great.
editL: it was raybestos pads. not the low end ones though
 

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87 Camry Wgn 232k
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475 Posts
Ceramic Pads: CR's Recommendations

ConsumerReports.org.
December 2005
Brake pads: What to look for
What you should know when having brake servicing done.

Ceramic: These are composed of ceramic fibers, nonferrous filler materials, bonding agents, and possibly small amounts of metal. Lighter in color and more expensive than other brake pads, ceramic pads are cleaner and quieter, and offer excellent braking characteristics without wearing down the rotors.”

Look for a certified label


“In an effort to improve the customer's comfort level--and also to avoid future government regulations--brake manufacturers can test and verify their products under two voluntary certification standards.”

“The first is an independent proprietary program developed by Greening Testing Laboratories in Detroit called D3EA--which stands for Dual Dynamometer Differential Effectiveness Analysis. This procedure tests front and rear friction materials together on dual dynamometers, then simulates vehicle weight and speed through a computer program to measure braking effectiveness and balance for different applications. D3EA was introduced in 1996, and among the first aftermarket companies to achieve D3EA certification were ACDelco, NAPA, Raybestos, and Satisfied.”

“In November of 2002, the Brake Manufacturers Council (BMC) announced a second certification standard called BEEP, or Brake Effectiveness Evaluation Procedure.”

“The D3EA tests are proprietary and more expensive, but they're also completely independent and tougher to pass.”

Consumers must remember that not all of an aftermarket manufacturer's lineup gets certified, only pads designed for a specific vehicle that passed the designated test. Also, since the D3EA tests are expensive, manufacturers may test just the standard line for a particular vehicle. One can assume then that any upgraded line from that same manufacturer will meet the test standards. That's why heavy duty or the new ceramic pads may not carry the seal. The best advice is to look for manufacturers that aggressively test their standard line, then move up in grade if you need more performance or seek other advantages such as minimal wheel dust.”

For the full report see the following link:
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/brake-pads-what-to-look-for-1205.htm
 

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87 Camry Wgn 232k
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Hi WhiteRabbit,

So which brand of ceramic pads did you select? Are you pleased with them? How do they compare to your previous brake pads?
 
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