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It seems after 22 years I've replaced just about everything in this car, a few times, but I can't help wondering - is there some 22 year old part just waiting to die on me? Any diehards know of parts to give out on the '98 1MZFE that I haven't replaced yet?

Thoughts welcome!

Accelerator cable assembly (recall)
Timing belt, tensioner, tension bearing, idler, crank + cam seals
P/S belt
Water pump
Alternator, belt
Fuel injectors
Fuel filter
Valve cover gaskets
Spark plugs, wires
Coil packs
Rear sway bar bushings
Wheel bearings
Inner and outer tie rods
PVC valve
EGR valve
Strut mounts, stabilizer links
Air filter
Calipers, brake hoses
Brake pads
Rotors
Coolant
All console bulbs (LED)
Upper radiator hose
ATF and filter
Did I mention oil?
 

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2004 Toyota Camry, 2017 Toyota Camry, and many many more lol
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238 Posts
It seems after 22 years I've replaced just about everything in this car, a few times, but I can't help wondering - is there some 22 year old part just waiting to die on me? Any diehards know of parts to give out on the '98 1MZFE that I haven't replaced yet?

Thoughts welcome!

Accelerator cable assembly (recall)
Timing belt, tensioner, tension bearing, idler, crank + cam seals
P/S belt
Water pump
Alternator, belt
Fuel injectors
Fuel filter
Valve cover gaskets
Spark plugs, wires
Coil packs
Rear sway bar bushings
Wheel bearings
Inner and outer tie rods
PVC valve
EGR valve
Strut mounts, stabilizer links
Air filter
Calipers, brake hoses
Brake pads
Rotors
Coolant
All console bulbs (LED)
Upper radiator hose
ATF and filter
Did I mention oil?
Looks like after 22 years you are good to go lol of course always keep an eye on everything I check all my vehicles at least once a week to make sure everything is good like the fluids and stuff and you have only replaced the upper radiator hose that’s surprising most of them dry rot after awhile or at least that’s what I have seen. Have you done a brake flush? Or a power steering flush? If not and the fluid is dirty I would go ahead and do it just my thoughts.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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x2 brake fluid, and power steering fluid, these should be done every 50k miles, along with the coolant and AT fluid, on a high mileage car

There are a few youtube videos on the dealer who did the servicing on the 2, million mile Tundras, and the changing of fluids on a regular interval was key to them lasting so long (i.e., do NOT follow the factory recommendations, change them more frequently than that, that dealer used 50k miles as the interval and found it worked very well).

As far as parts goes, replace them when they wear out, and when they do they'll let you know.
However, keep an eye on CV boots and belts for early signs of cracking, replace them before they split (CVs can be re-booted almost forever, so long as they are done before dirt gets in).

The suspension isn't on your list: keep an eye on the bushings, for signs of cracking/ splitting, and I've found struts and top mounts, if replaced at ~80k mile intervals, maintains a new car ride. Sadly, if Toyota no longer sells the struts for your car you then have to get onto the "aftermarket roulette", to try and find pattern parts which will ride/handle as well as the originals did.
 

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Camreee
'99 Auto V6 Camry
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407 Posts
Regarding OEM quality shocks/top-mounts: Toyota still sells them, for $210 per corner.

KYBs Excel-G line is comparable in every way to OEM. (except possibly longevity, not saying they don't last, just that I don't know that they will last 200-300k miles like OEM ones do for some people, no clue). The damping is slightly stronger for a firmer feel but also more linear than OEM, and the KYB top hat bearings seem to have better steering response and return under cornering.

Another option is to just grab 4 Excel-G/OEM struts, and a KYB or Toyota Top-hat. Should be fine to put your springs on them if they don't sag. I don't recall where I saw it but Toyota has listed the pinch weld ride heights that you measure to find out if a spring is still in spec.

Moog and Monroe premium lines will hold up fine and are worth the money if you do your own work and want to save a few hundred bucks; Anything below that is a waste of money unless you're selling the car within a year.

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Others have mentioned flushing ATF and P/S fluid. If you do so I would highly recommend adding in a Magnefine in-line filter to both the power steering return line and transmission radiator return line when the fluid has been drained. These filters are super easy to install with 2 constant tension hose clamps, a spare foot of 3/8ths hose, and a knife. They will extend the life of both systems by magnetically pulling ferrous particles out of the return fluid after it's been cycled through where its used. That way metal particles are not being continuously cycled and sent into your radiators, pumps, steering rack, and trans. Don't buy the plastic ones if you decide to install some. The metal cased ones are a bit more but have replaceable filters.

The trans magnets don't pick up all the metal going through the pan, even with extra magnets under the mesh filter you won't catch all the shavings on the pan magnets before they cycle through the transmission who knows how many times. These In-line filters work much better at getting metal out before it ever can cause more wear because the magnets are much much closer to fluid which is guaranteed to pass by the magnet on its way to being cooled.
 

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Camreee
'99 Auto V6 Camry
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407 Posts
Also another thing to keep an eye on is the front control arm rear donut bushing. It takes a buttload of longitudal force every time you accelerate or brake.

When that bushing is shot those forces are no longer controlled as effectively or at all by that bushing, causing your tie rods, ball joints and possibly steering rack see a lot more wear, especially if the bushing has split.

When you brake or accelerate they take over the donut bushings job of holding the hub aligned, but ball joints and tie rods are not designed to handle that type of force by themselves, and they die really quickly along with causing bump steer problems if the bushing is broken.

It's easier to replace the entire arm, but if you want a slightly firmer front end feel you can install split whiteline polyurethane bushings ($50 for 2) without any additional tools but a hacksaw to cut the bushing retainer ring out, you can press the split ones in by hand or with your foot.

Along with being a performance upgrade stability-wise when it comes to steering, braking and torque steer, they will take pressure off the ball joints and outer tie rods and increase their lifespan by holding the control arm in place so other parts don't need to compensate for bushing flex.
 

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Motor mounts might be done...they were in my 1998.



Coolant By-pass hose near the knock sensor. replace the knock sensor harness too. Some opt to even get brand new knock sensors since its' down there'. Do not use 'ebay genuine' ones as they are often time counterfeit. I got lucky pulling low miles one from the junkyard. By-pass hose sometimes gets overlooked because of well...it's underneath the lower pendulum. You'll know when it goes -- steam and your temp gauge will be pegged real quick. Adding in any coolant you'll get steam of coolant/water from the front and a back of the engine near the starter.

Thread on the knock sensors and has a better pic of the coolant by-pass hose p/n


This coolant bypass hose tends to fail from 200-300K, age seems to be around 15-20 ish years old. Good coolant quality helps extends this hose life.

Lots of pictures in my other thread








new OEM harness is around $30. do NOT go dorman on this part, bad reviews.


Also not a bad time to replace these coolant hoses going to the throttle body. I used cut to fit hoses on my 1995, but on my 1998 i got oem hoses.



By-pass hose part number. go OEM for this.
 

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Camreeeee, I can't find replacement filters for the Magnefine metal filter either on Amazon or at Magnefine's website. Where can I find them? Also, how often should they be changed, or in the alternative, the Magnefine filter replaced?
 

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2004 Toyota Camry, 2017 Toyota Camry, and many many more lol
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Camreeeee, I can't find replacement filters for the Magnefine metal filter either on Amazon or at Magnefine's website. Where can I find them? Also, how often should they be changed, or in the alternative, the Magnefine filter replaced?
You could check eBay they might have them usually they have a lot of parts or check RockAuto possibly
 

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short-throw dipstick
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For Magnefines: https://magnefinefilters.com/

...is the domestic importer for them in the US.

OP, just keep doing the requisite fluids and other maintenance (timing belt) on time and you should be good. And perhaps make sure to handle the water bypass hose below the intake every 150K or so (if it bursts it will dump coolant and you risk overheating the engine). Everything else, change when they go bad. The difference between your car and, say, some Chrysler garbage from the same era is the high quality of OE parts; they last a very long time.
 
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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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"do you recommend any other brands of water bypass hoses?"

Yes: OEM, for the reasons already stated
 

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People don't usually think about it, but your speakers are 22 years old. They may sound good now but for how long? Ironically my speakers were OEM when I got the car and they died within a few months. One of them at least. Upgrading audio is worthwhile. You don't have to go crazy mind you, but even upgrading to newer speakers will make things sound a lot nicer.

If you have power seats have you taken the covers off and re-greased everything? Some fresh grease will help the seats slide and help prevent the motors from burning out. At 22 years old, that grease is still good but how much is still there?

Look under your battery tray. Is the metal starting to rust? It's a pretty common area to rust and it wouldn't hurt to check. If it is rusty and it's just surface rust, clean it off with a wire brush and paint it so it will last longer.

Check your motor mounts for cracking or signs of age.

You said upper radiator hose but what about lower?

That's all I can think of to check on the moment.
 

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norm356, can you recommend a brand and vendor for those CV boots? How about tie rod boots, too? Thanks
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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I buy all of those parts from the dealer (or from an online dealer who gives me the best deal). OEM parts last 100~200k + miles. Aftermarket / pattern parts usually don't. Their lower initial cost isn't worth it, in my experience.
 

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2001 Camry LE
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Fuel pumps aren't a particular problem on this car and tend to last well over 200K+ miles, but I don't know how many miles your car has. Your starter is original as well? They are not a common problem either, and tend to give warning before they completely fail.

The one thing I see missing from your list that surprises me is the radiator... yours is original??? On one of my 2001s, the radiator cracked along the top tank at 13 years old, roughly 120K miles, replaced by the previous owner. On my other 2001, the radiator cracked the exact same way at 17 years old and 88K miles.
 
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