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Discussion Starter #1
If you could give info like engine and if auto or manual, I would appreciate it.
And any other factors, like if all highway or if you are a hypermiler...that sort of thing.

I'm in the market, and I had wanted a corrolla with stick for the high mpg's that i could easily get...but the wife wants something bigger for trips when she is sitting in the back with the toddler.

I currently have a 97 4runner with 240K miles (thing is a freakin tank) that we use for road trips, that gets about 18mpg mixed driving.

I went to fueleconomy.gov and saw that the camry didnt get much better than about 24mpg mixed driving.

If the difference isnt that much, than I would just as soon get another 4runner and then have even more room and be able to tow and have 4wd, etc....

But, I'm wondering what you guys really get in real life driving.

thx
 

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There have been a million threads discussing fuel economy here. A quick search would probably net you more info that you could ever want.
 

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I just bought a 2000 Solara SLE V6 3.0L about 2 months ago (automatic), and I'm getting around 22mpg in town on 87 octane gas. I get around 25mpg on the highway, but I haven't changed the oil myself yet. I have heard running synthetic oil that it will probably net better gas mileage.
 

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97 Camry 4 cylinder 5 speed gets around 30 MPG, highest I've gotten is 33.

94 Camry V6 5 speed with tons of modifications, including a high flow fuel pump, gets around 17 MPG highway :D
 

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Wow people here get pretty good mileage. My brother drives the Camry now, maybe 20 miles of freeway + 5 miles of city, and he gets around 29 mpg (+/-1)

Oh, 2.2 Auto, btw, on California gas
 

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'97 Camry 2.2l/auto, city mostly, 25mpg

Some have mentioned octane, octane and MPG are not related, just FYI.

87 octane and 95 octane have the same "energy" per gallon so will result in the same MPG.
Higher octane fuel is less likely to pre-ignite under compression than lower octane.
Higher octane also does not "burn cleaner", another myth.

If your engine doesn't "knock/ping" on regular gas then running with anything else is a waste of money.
 

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97 4cyl automatic 130k miles

19-20 city. very short distances, 35-40mph speed limit, and lots of stop lights.

most ive gotten on highway is about 28mpg. not sure if running a 225/45 tire has anything to do with it
 

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Some have mentioned octane, octane and MPG are not related, just FYI.

87 octane and 95 octane have the same "energy" per gallon so will result in the same MPG.

Higher octane fuel is less likely to pre-ignite under compression than lower octane.

If your engine doesn't "knock/ping" on regular gas then running with anything else is a waste of money.
Your first sentence is not true. Your 2nd & 3rd sentences are true. Your 4th sentence may be true.

For older engines that did not yet employ knock sensors, timing is not affected by pre-ignition due to low octane fuel, and as such, these engines are prone to knock on low octane fuel in certain driving situations - and when this happens, your MPG is negatively affected.

More recent engines that employ knock sensors adjust timing when pre-ignition begins, retarding timing to prevent hard knocks. Timing that is retarded from ideal happens a little too late for the engine to gain as much rotational energy from the flame dispersion, so MPG is negatively affected.

Energy content of gasoline is about equal, regardless of octane level, that is true. Getting the engine to convert this energy content into rotational power efficiently is the issue.

I will agree if someone has driving characteristics that would never cause an early engine w/o knock sensors to knock on low octane fuel, or with a newer engine w/knock sensors to retard timing due to pre-ignition, that person would not gain any MPG benefit from a higher octane fuel.

The major question is whether the added cost of the higher octane fuel is justified by having more than enough offset in better MPG, so that the cost of fuel per mile is lower. I personally think MPG is improved slightly with a higher octane fuel, but is not enough to lower the fuel cost per mile to justify it.
 

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Your first sentence is not true. Your 2nd & 3rd sentences are true. Your 4th sentence may be true.

For older engines that did not yet employ knock sensors, timing is not affected by pre-ignition due to low octane fuel, and as such, these engines are prone to knock on low octane fuel in certain driving situations - and when this happens, your MPG is negatively affected.

More recent engines that employ knock sensors adjust timing when pre-ignition begins, retarding timing to prevent hard knocks. Timing that is retarded from ideal happens a little too late for the engine to gain as much rotational energy from the flame dispersion, so MPG is negatively affected.

Energy content of gasoline is about equal, regardless of octane level, that is true. Getting the engine to convert this energy content into rotational power efficiently is the issue.

I will agree if someone has driving characteristics that would never cause an early engine w/o knock sensors to knock on low octane fuel, or with a newer engine w/knock sensors to retard timing due to pre-ignition, that person would not gain any MPG benefit from a higher octane fuel.

The major question is whether the added cost of the higher octane fuel is justified by having more than enough offset in better MPG, so that the cost of fuel per mile is lower. I personally think MPG is improved slightly with a higher octane fuel, but is not enough to lower the fuel cost per mile to justify it.
Interesting take on that.
If an engine designed to run on 87 octane pings/knocks in any driving situation then, IMO, there is a problem with the engine or the gas itself.
Switch brands of gas, run some Seaform thru the system to try to clean off any carbon build up that might cause hot spots in the cylinders causing pinging/knocking.
If the engine is running hotter than usual, which can cause pinging, get the cooling system checked out.
Engine timing sensors may have issues or CPU.

Running a higher octane fuel might prevent the pinging/knocking but the underlying issue of why there was pinging/knocking using the designated octane level is not dealt with, and could end up being a bigger issue in the future.

So engine issues aside I still think MPG and octane are not related.
i.e. 5SFE engine running well with 87 octane getting 25mpg would get the same 25mpg running 93octane, only change would be in the weight of your wallet :)
 

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You know, I just read through your post, OP, and I just wanted to point out that the jump from 18-24 mpg is pretty big.

Over 18k miles, a car with 18 mpg uses 1000 gallons, while a car with 24 mph uses 750 gallons, that's a difference of 250 gallons, or about $1000 if gas is ~$4/gal.

It's not a HUGE amount, but I think its pretty significant to most people (it is to me, at least).
 

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are there any other benefits of running a higher octane. ive heard that its good to just occasionally run a premium tank of gas through the engine. like any cleaning benefits? because i know shell always has those commercials of what their premium gas does and stuff. so i was curious if it's any beneficial to a little 5sfe engine like mine?
 

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are there any other benefits of running a higher octane. ive heard that its good to just occasionally run a premium tank of gas through the engine. like any cleaning benefits? because i know shell always has those commercials of what their premium gas does and stuff. so i was curious if it's any beneficial to a little 5sfe engine like mine?
In my opinion, no, as far as the octane, some brands of gas have "cleaners" added, but they are added to all octane levels of that brand as far as I know.

If you are able to buy generic gas for a few cents less a gallon, no additives, then running a tank of name brand gas a few times a year, of the same octane, might be a benefit.
But a can of Seafoam in the tank for $10 once a year would probably work better.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You know, I just read through your post, OP, and I just wanted to point out that the jump from 18-24 mpg is pretty big.

Over 18k miles, a car with 18 mpg uses 1000 gallons, while a car with 24 mph uses 750 gallons, that's a difference of 250 gallons, or about $1000 if gas is ~$4/gal.

It's not a HUGE amount, but I think its pretty significant to most people (it is to me, at least).

hey,
yeah, but we would probably only run about 10K miles per year, so it would be a bit less than a grand a year...maybe 600 or so...and the added benefit of 4wd, good towing capacity, and more room, are enough to be worth it in my opinion.

of course, the wife may disagree :lol:

from what I have read, there is a pretty big variance in mpg's, but it looks like I could probably get near 30...especially if I buy a 4cyl with a stick.

If I can find one, lol
 

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Discussion Starter #18
to add onto the post above,
consider the difference between a corolla and camry.

a corolla will get, say, 38 mpg mixed driving

the camry gets 28 mpg mixed driving.

So, apparently, many on here are willing to overlook this expense each year to own a slightly larger vehicle.:thumbsup:

other than size, there are no advantages of a camry over a corolla....are there?

However, as mentioned, the 4 runner has many advantages over a camry...for about the same cost difference as the corolla/camry comparo.

just a thought...
 

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to add onto the post above,
consider the difference between a corolla and camry.

a corolla will get, say, 38 mpg mixed driving

the camry gets 28 mpg mixed driving.

So, apparently, many on here are willing to overlook this expense each year to own a slightly larger vehicle.:thumbsup:

other than size, there are no advantages of a camry over a corolla....are there?

However, as mentioned, the 4 runner has many advantages over a camry...for about the same cost difference as the corolla/camry comparo.

just a thought...
Do you personally get 38mpg mixed with a Corolla? What year?
 

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