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I have 30k on my 2016 LE, and I'm quite worried about having a CVT transmission. Hoping some community members have gotten lots of miles on theirs trouble free. I love the car and how it drives, just got worried reading crap about CVT's
 

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just got worried reading crap about CVT's
Some people don't like the way a CVT operates and there have been some notoriously bad engineered units (Jatco Nissan...) hence the crap you read. Despite the impression, it doesn't mean it applies to all and every CVT, just like recalls and firmware updates on regular automatics from various brands don't mean the AT is a flawed concept. There have been a service campaign (firmware update) for Corolla which you should get if not already done. Aside that, those CVT have been in Corolla for now 6 years in NA (9 years worldwide) without a particular surge in complaints (TrueDelta, JD Powers, Consumer Reports) other than the inevitable odd unit of any human made thing. Toyota's maintenance guide is the same whether AT or CVT : inspect fluid every 30K (mainly check for codes and temperature peaks - the main cause of fluid degrading and the main problem with those first Jatco Nissan) and act accordingly, with suggested fluid replacement at 60K for "severe" usage. That's about where I'm at now. It's perfectly doable by yourself but I'd rather go to a trusted mechanic as CVT are simple in concept but require very precise variables.
284606
 

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The procedure is in the following link: https://www.pakwheels.com/forums/t/correct-procedure-oem-to-change-cvt-fluid-oil-in-altis-grande-1800-cc-2zrfe-transmission-k313/995963

I suppose you can use a OBD reader to monitor the transmission temperature but I have not personally confirmed it reads identically as doing it following this guide.

Temperature in Farenheit is between 104F-113F.

I personally recommend doing two drain and fill's to remove most of the previous fluid.


If you learn visually and there is nothing wrong with that here is a nice video to watch of the process:
 

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@Di3S3L may be upwards of 300k.
 

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Some people don't like the way a CVT operates and there have been some notoriously bad engineered units (Jatco Nissan...) hence the crap you read. Despite the impression, it doesn't mean it applies to all and every CVT, just like recalls and firmware updates on regular automatics from various brands don't mean the AT is a flawed concept. There have been a service campaign (firmware update) for Corolla which you should get if not already done. Aside that, those CVT have been in Corolla for now 6 years in NA (9 years worldwide) without a particular surge in complaints (TrueDelta, JD Powers, Consumer Reports) other than the inevitable odd unit of any human made thing. Toyota's maintenance guide is the same whether AT or CVT : inspect fluid every 30K (mainly check for codes and temperature peaks - the main cause of fluid degrading and the main problem with those first Jatco Nissan) and act accordingly, with suggested fluid replacement at 60K for "severe" usage. That's about where I'm at now. It's perfectly doable by yourself but I'd rather go to a trusted mechanic as CVT are simple in concept but require very precise variables.
View attachment 284606
CVT's have been in vehicle's since the 80's but not wide spread as we are seeing now. I also saw some buses are switching to CVT's to increase fuel efficiency
 
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