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Discussion Starter #1
The 8-speed transmission on the current gen Camry, specifically the 2018 model is scaring me away. It's a shame though because I love the new Camry's SE redesign but I'd feel more comfortable knowing that the 6 speed from the last gen is not suffering from the jerkiness/stuttering of the new platform.

I saw several videos of current gen owners getting crazy MPG numbers like high 30s to anywhere from low to mid 40s with the 4 cylinder engine. What changed from 2017 to 2018 besides the transmission for the Camry to be able to make those numbers? Do the extra 2 gears really make that much of a difference?
 

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Yep, the extra gears drop RPM and increase load on the engine, which makes it run more thermally efficient. The secret to driving for better mileage is covered in the fuel economy section of the forum where I have posted good information. Bottom line is avoid using the brakes and keep engine RPMs as low as possible, which is where the 8 speed shines.
EPA testing showed the potential for an 80% in fuel economy with powertrain improvements alone. Those who drive the model in question and follow the above suggestion can get mileages that are almost unbelievable.
 

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I believe that the 2017 and my 2015 have the same powertrain, and my 2015 always stays near 35mpg because I don't use it for any short trips at all so the engine spends little time in a cold state.

On the freeway for an hour or more, after resetting the ODO, the cruising speed determines the mileage, with 75mph netting about 36mpg. It drops a couple of mpg up at 80mph, and increases a couple of mpg at 70mph.

The mileage in gentle "city" driving (with not too many stop lights) is fantastic, as long as the engine isn't allowed to cool off every five or ten miles. Credit the transmission with keeping engine rpm well below 2000 rpm (actually as low as 1100rpm under load).

Of course the design of the engine, with it's variable camshaft timing, allows the engine to pull down low with authority, and the engine mounts and such keep any excess vibration from resulting at such a low rpm.
The engine is also specifically designed to last a super long time under such low rpm loading, which is key to the design approach for best mpg.

Keep your tires inflated right at their recommended pressure, don't wait for them to lose 2-3psi if you want to hit the best mpg numbers! The arrival of cold weather will drop your tire's psi, likely more than you expected!
 

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16' Camry SE & 18' Camry XSE
16 SE & 18 XSE Camry
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You are forming your opinion about new 8-spd trans based on 20 people posting here on toyotanation and further 70 or so people posting on other forums. This is 100 people out of about close to 1 milion gen 8 camrys sold up to now. I have no issues with my trans in my 2018 Kentucky made Camry. I still have 2016 Camry SE with about 50k miles and for me, the new 8spd trans is miles ahead of old 6spd in all regards.

To answer your question, while driving to work 37 miles each way 50% suburbs, 40% highway 10% city I get 29-33 mpg with my 2016 and 38-44 mpg with my 2018. That all depends on the temperature, cars burn more gas in winter.
 

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Can you tell us what rpm that your 2018 Camry 4-cyl is turning at 75mph? On the earlier generation it seems to be well above 2000rpm, 2200(?) or so, and I am curious how much lower it is on the 2018 and 2019 models.
As Old Mechanic mentioned, the lower rpm is key to achieving super-high engine efficiency, by keeping the cylinder pressures higher and by keeping the "pumping losses" as low as possible.

Another question, is the 2018 model a bigger or smaller car than the previous generation (which is pretty big).
Is there any change in weight of the vehicles?
 

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Peak engine efficiency is at 80-90% of full throttle. The other factor is RPM. Some manufacturers are actually opening the throttle valve completely (drive by wire) and using the fuel delivery to control power delivery. With the 8 speeds they can lower RPM enough to run the throttle plate wide open. This increases compression pressure which produces more power for every combustion It's actually what used to be called lugging the engine, but with fuel delivery controlled. The controlled delivery means higher compression pressure at lower RPM. The control unit will not allow you to "lug" in the traditional sense when carburetors delivered the fuel.
Add to that the precision of fuel delivery. In Mazda engines the fuel is injected 5 times before, during, and after peak combustion pressures are reached. Pre ignition is no longer possible and peak combustion pressures are spread out over a wider range of the power stroke, giving more of a push than a bang to the con rod and the rest of the powertrain., octane requirements mean nothing anymore regardless of the compression ratio.
This is close to homogeneous charge compression ignition and direct injection at super high pressures are a key. No need to after treat the exhaust (no cat)
Mazda even had the engine stop the piston in exactly the right place to fire the plug on a compressed mixture and restart the engine with no starter motor. This was coincidental, now it is intentional. Ever crank your engine and have it fire instantly?
The ECU can determine crank position by "counting" the teeth on the flywheel. That's counting say 105 teeth 700 times a minute at idle.
I'd bet the RPM would be lower than 2k, maybe less than 1700 at 70 mph. That's where your two extra gears make a huge difference, with lower engine speed combined with the throttle being wide open or very close to it.
 

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16' Camry SE & 18' Camry XSE
16 SE & 18 XSE Camry
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Can you tell us what rpm that your 2018 Camry 4-cyl is turning at 75mph? On the earlier generation it seems to be well above 2000rpm, 2200(?) or so, and I am curious how much lower it is on the 2018 and 2019 models.
As Old Mechanic mentioned, the lower rpm is key to achieving super-high engine efficiency, by keeping the cylinder pressures higher and by keeping the "pumping losses" as low as possible.

Another question, is the 2018 model a bigger or smaller car than the previous generation (which is pretty big).
Is there any change in weight of the vehicles?
Next time Ill take my wife's 18 to work Ill take a closer look and get back.
 

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BeerSteakTxas
2012 Camry LE
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The 8-speed transmission on the current gen Camry, specifically the 2018 model is scaring me away. It's a shame though because I love the new Camry's SE redesign but I'd feel more comfortable knowing that the 6 speed from the last gen is not suffering from the jerkiness/stuttering of the new platform.

I saw several videos of current gen owners getting crazy MPG numbers like high 30s to anywhere from low to mid 40s with the 4 cylinder engine. What changed from 2017 to 2018 besides the transmission for the Camry to be able to make those numbers? Do the extra 2 gears really make that much of a difference?
If you so worried about the 8AT and MPG get a used Gen 7 Hybrid: no 8 AT and better MPG .
And take both cars for a test drive: I had a 2012 and 14 2.5 6AT and imo the new 8 AT is sluggish and busy around town.
 

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Just my opinion, but I would take the 8 speed over a CVT transmission vehicle.
One would think that the CVT vehicles would post better fuel economy numbers vs the 8 speed.
Take a look at the fuel economy of the new CVT Corolla vs the 8 speed Camry.
As advised above.....take a 8 speed for a drive and compare to a late model 6 speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just my opinion, but I would take the 8 speed over a CVT transmission vehicle.
One would think that the CVT vehicles would post better fuel economy numbers vs the 8 speed.
Take a look at the fuel economy of the new CVT Corolla vs the 8 speed Camry.
As advised above.....take a 8 speed for a drive and compare to a late model 6 speed.
Yeah, I'm kind of excited and nervous at the same time. I'm a veteran when buying cars and negotiating but it's just the tranny that makes nervous. Tomorrow I start test driving. I'll report back for sure.
 

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16' Camry SE & 18' Camry XSE
16 SE & 18 XSE Camry
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Guys, Google toyota synergy drive. They are not using conventional cvt in hybryd camry. It's an interesting design and also reason why you don't hear about that transmission's failures. It's like it is a reversed differential with electric and ice engine on both ends.

is a nice explanation.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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Almost 1 year of ownership, put on 17k miles. I've never had it on the interstate for hours, so I'd expect those numbers to be in the 34-36 MPG range.

Dave.
 

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I just bought mine last Friday, and have been doing a mix of city and freeway driving - netting 28 mpg combined. I’m curious to see what it will do on long road trips on the open highways.
 

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Just remember that the money you might save in mpgs over the course of YEARS in a competitor vehicle can easily be outweighed by unexpected repair or maintenance costs from a more unreliable design.
 

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16' Camry SE & 18' Camry XSE
16 SE & 18 XSE Camry
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New Camrys have direct injection - this is the primary reason for improved MPG.
New camrys have both, direct and port injection to prevent carbon buildup. I hail Toyota for doing so and also bought a 2018 camry :)

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New camrys have both, direct and port injection to prevent carbon buildup. I hail Toyota for doing so and also bought a 2018 camry :)

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Smart on their part after seeing what happened to Volkswagen’s GDI engines with carbon buildup.
 
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