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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory. In
fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road freak... ;)

(1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
(2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
(3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
(4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?

I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
have a discussion...
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I do not use chains, Never have had the need. WHY? Cause I drive a Toyota!
Really, I drive on BFGoodrich AT KO's 31/10.5/15, The only tire I have been
using since my first Toyota back in 90. THough I only live in PA, so there
really is not much snow here, I rarely even have to lock in the front
wheels. I usually use 4X4 in the mt's or the mud. WE haul a camper so alot
of the time its for deceleration. My 91 SR5 v6 had ARB lockers and NO I have
never "landed in the ditch" Off road driving take experience, usually that
means getting out there and screwing up or having a good teacher.

Searcher
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chris wrote:
> In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory. In
> fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road freak... ;)
>
> (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
> (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
> (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
> (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>
> I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
> have a discussion...
>
>

1) Neither...I drive in the winter on real winter tires, Bridgestone
Blizzak DM-Z3. I feel that they are much safer than all-season or
all-terrain tires, especially when trying to dodge the fool sliding
toward you in your lane.
2) Chains for both the truck and the trailer. These are required
in Washington for towing a trailer when winter traction tires are
required on cars.
3) LaClede diamond pattern chains
4) Not because of 4wd, but because of lack of tire traction where
4wd was no help
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Chris schrieb:

> In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory. In
> fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road freak... ;)
>
> (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
> (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
> (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
> (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>
> I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
> have a discussion...


I have a BJ42 with LockRight front and rear.

I'm driving Colway AT's 31x10,5-15 in winter. I always have two pairs (eq. 4)
chains with me. Winters here in Bavaria can throw half a meter or more snow on
the tracks in half a day and sometimes flash freezing rain gives 2cm of pure
blank ice on the streets in 2 hours. Chains provide excellent traction in such
situations and dig even through mud incidently covered beneath snow on the
green.

A hidden trench once used 4L and chains to dig out w/o winching. Couldn't see
the track anymore due to heavy snow drifts.

Regards,

Axel
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:X%[email protected]
> In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory.
> In fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road
> freak... ;)
>
> (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
> (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
> (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
> (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>
> I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
> have a discussion...
>


In what state are tire chains mandatory?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
|
| "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| news:X%[email protected]
| > In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there
mandatory.
| > In fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road
| > freak... ;)
| >
| > (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
| > (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
| > (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
| > (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
| >
| > I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them.
Lets
| > have a discussion...
| >
|
| In what state are tire chains mandatory?
|
|

Colorado, when the passes are snow bound. No chains, no go.

--
Jarhead

"We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human
passions unbridled by morality and religion...Our Constitution was made
only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the
government of any other."
-John Adams
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 19:56:03 GMT, "Doug Kanter" <[email protected]>
found these unused words floating about:

>
>"Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:X%[email protected]
>> In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory.
>> In fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road
>> freak... ;)
>>
>> (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
>> (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
>> (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
>> (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>>
>> I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
>> have a discussion...
>>

>
>In what state are tire chains mandatory?
>

Oregon - "Snow Zone" {execptions apply}
Washington - Some areas plus if you tow.
Nevada - Where posted
Utah - Where posted
California - Where posted
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mandatory in California too. If you don't have chains, you either won't
be allowed to enter or leave the ski resort areas.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mandatory in California too. If you don't have chains, you either won't
be allowed to enter or leave the ski resort areas.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mandatory in California too. If you don't have chains, you either won't
be allowed to enter or leave the ski resort areas.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Doug Kanter wrote:
> "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:X%[email protected]
>
>>In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory.
>>In fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road
>>freak... ;)
>>
>>(1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
>>(2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
>>(3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
>>(4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>>
>>I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
>>have a discussion...
>>

>
>
> In what state are tire chains mandatory?
>
>

Chains must be onboard when driving mountain passes in Washington,
and must be used under specified conditions.

I like Wyoming's Basic Chain Law. You need whatever traction device
necessary to stay under control. If you slide off the road and
didn't use chains, you're in violation. If you didn't slide off,
you didn't legally need chains.


Ken
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On Tue, 13 Dec 2005 12:05:26 -0800, Ken Shelton
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Doug Kanter wrote:
>> "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:X%[email protected]
>>
>>>In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory.
>>>In fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road
>>>freak... ;)
>>>
>>>(1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?
>>>(2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?
>>>(3.) What brand do you carry If you do?
>>>(4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?
>>>
>>>I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
>>>have a discussion...
>>>

>>
>>
>> In what state are tire chains mandatory?




Nevada and California have mandatory chain carry and use laws.

I've used both chains and cables but now I carry Spikes-Spiders (Sport
model) - great in ice, snow and mud. They are expensive but the
first time you put them on at the side of the road when it's 20F in a
freezing rain and it takes about one minute per tire, it'll be worth
every dollar you paid for them.

I'm not an "off-roader" but occasionally I have to drive on dirt roads
in bad weather in the mountains by Reno/Lake Tahoe.

Skip
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
in article X%[email protected], Chris at
[email protected] wrote on 12/12/05 1:56 AM:

> In some States Tire chains are illegal, in other states there mandatory. In
> fact some chains are made for mud and snow for the real off road freak... ;)
>
> (1.) Do you have (S/M or A/T) tires?


Yes. My Jeep has Goodyear MTR's, and my Land Cruiser has BFG AT's. The
MTR's are not good on snow and ice, while the AT's are excellent. Then
again, the BFG's suck in mud and the MTR's are good in mud. Gotta choose
your battles with tires.

> (2.) How about chains, do you have a set or two?


I have TWO sets of heavy-duty, high-quality chains for my Jeep. That's
because things get hairy enough up at elk camp that a guy just might need
both sets. I learned that the year I just had one set!

I have a set of the same good chains for the Land Cruiser, because it's the
family adventure-mobile and it's my responsibility to get us all there
alive. If things go really hairy I'd chain up but otherwise, a good rig
with with good tires and a good nut behind the wheel will get you there just
fine. The BFG AT's have the "snowflake" symbol that means, legally
speaking, that they ARE a traction device in and of themselves, so I'm not
legally required to carry chains. But I still do.

> (3.) What brand do you carry If you do?


Les Schwab premium.

> (4.) Have you ever landed your self in a ditch because of 4WD?


Because of 4wd? Are you one one those flat-earthers who thinks that 4wd is
BAD in snow?

>
> I've heard both the pros & cons on this matter. I myself use them. Lets
> have a discussion...


I'll chain up if the shit gets REALLY bad, or if my vehicle and tires are
not appropriate to the conditions. Otherwise I maintain a good distance to
obstacles and TAKE IT EASY.

-jeff
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
They sure do! The California Highway Patrol sets up check points at the
entrances to the ski areas. If you don't have them on, you're turned
away at which time you have three options...put on the chains you're
carrying but didn't put on yet, go down the mountain and buy them from
someone on the side of the road who is selling them for a premium(a $40
set of chains can cost you $100.00 plus from these scalpers); or just
go back home. These chain scalpers are on the side of the road just
looking for un-prepared suckers who will most likely pay their
outrageous prices rather than go driving hours to go back down the
mountain to a real store, or worse, cancel their trip all together and
just go home.

If you happen to be leaving a resort area and are turned back, you're
faced with additional lodging and food prices until the conditions
improve and you're allowed to leave without chains.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
They sure do! The California Highway Patrol sets up check points at the
entrances to the ski areas. If you don't have them on, you're turned
away at which time you have three options...put on the chains you're
carrying but didn't put on yet, go down the mountain and buy them from
someone on the side of the road who is selling them for a premium(a $40
set of chains can cost you $100.00 plus from these scalpers); or just
go back home. These chain scalpers are on the side of the road just
looking for un-prepared suckers who will most likely pay their
outrageous prices rather than go driving hours to go back down the
mountain to a real store, or worse, cancel their trip all together and
just go home.

If you happen to be leaving a resort area and are turned back, you're
faced with additional lodging and food prices until the conditions
improve and you're allowed to leave without chains.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 10:16:36 GMT, Jeff Olsen
<[email protected]> wrote:

>in article [email protected], MrFixit469
>at [email protected] wrote on 12/12/05 8:10 PM:
>
>> Mandatory in California too. If you don't have chains, you either won't
>> be allowed to enter or leave the ski resort areas.
>>

>
>But surely they don't actually CHECK!?
>
>-jeff


The CHP won't let you in or out of "chain required areas" without
them. Ask anyone who didn't have chain on I80 heading to Nevada when
chain requirements are in effect or US 395 north of Bishop.

Skip
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 10:16:36 GMT, Jeff Olsen
<[email protected]> wrote:
>in article [email protected], MrFixit469
>at [email protected] wrote on 12/12/05 8:10 PM:


>> Mandatory in California too. If you don't have chains, you either won't
>> be allowed to enter or leave the ski resort areas.

>
>But surely they don't actually CHECK!?


Yes, they do. And don't call me Shirley.

When the weather calls for "Chains Required" they put up a
roadblock, and a Friendly California Highway Patrol Officer or local
Sheriff/Police Officer will flag the people with their chains
installed right on through, and turn around those without.

And if it's only a "must carry" restriction because they know the
weather is going to get bad in a few hours, you must show him you have
a set in the car before they let you past the checkpoint.

These are usually two-lane highways, so it's easy enough to do.
Takes a bit more effort for a major artery like I-5, but then they
also run the cars through in packs with an officer at the front of the
pack as escort setting a safe pace. Because there's always a yahoo in
an AWD Audi with Blizzak's who thinks 75 MPH in a white-out blizzard
is perfectly safe. For him, yeah, he's got grip to spare - till he
finds the back end of a Semi poking along at 15 MPH because the other
driver wants to see where he's going...

(As soundtrack, insert Nervous Norvus' [sp?] "Transfusion" here.)

It's a whole lot simpler to station one officer to man a tire chain
checkpoint, than all the effort of fishing people and their cars out
of a 300' canyon after the unintended right turn at the first patch of
ice. Not to mention the helicopter time for the hospital trip, and
all the firemen and paramedics...

--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
On 14 Dec 2005 09:28:26 -0800, "MrFixit469" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>They sure do! The California Highway Patrol sets up check points at the
>entrances to the ski areas. If you don't have them on, you're turned
>away at which time you have three options...put on the chains you're
>carrying but didn't put on yet, go down the mountain and buy them from
>someone on the side of the road who is selling them for a premium(a $40
>set of chains can cost you $100.00 plus from these scalpers); or just
>go back home. These chain scalpers are on the side of the road just
>looking for un-prepared suckers who will most likely pay their
>outrageous prices rather than go driving hours to go back down the
>mountain to a real store, or worse, cancel their trip all together and
>just go home.
>
>If you happen to be leaving a resort area and are turned back, you're
>faced with additional lodging and food prices until the conditions
>improve and you're allowed to leave without chains.


Chain up areas on the California side of E/B I80 seem to attract
people in orange vests who offer to put your chains on for what ever
they can get away from. Contrary to popular opinion, even though they
dress like Cal Trans, they don't work for Cal Trans.

Skip
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 18:14:58 GMT, Skip <[email protected]> found these
unused words floating about:

>On 14 Dec 2005 09:28:26 -0800, "MrFixit469" <[email protected]>
>wrote:
>
>>They sure do! The California Highway Patrol sets up check points at the
>>entrances to the ski areas. If you don't have them on, you're turned
>>away at which time you have three options...put on the chains you're
>>carrying but didn't put on yet, go down the mountain and buy them from
>>someone on the side of the road who is selling them for a premium(a $40
>>set of chains can cost you $100.00 plus from these scalpers); or just
>>go back home. These chain scalpers are on the side of the road just
>>looking for un-prepared suckers who will most likely pay their
>>outrageous prices rather than go driving hours to go back down the
>>mountain to a real store, or worse, cancel their trip all together and
>>just go home.
>>
>>If you happen to be leaving a resort area and are turned back, you're
>>faced with additional lodging and food prices until the conditions
>>improve and you're allowed to leave without chains.

>
>Chain up areas on the California side of E/B I80 seem to attract
>people in orange vests who offer to put your chains on for what ever
>they can get away from. Contrary to popular opinion, even though they
>dress like Cal Trans, they don't work for Cal Trans.
>

Orange Vests are AFAIK 'required' for anyone doing this (except the
motorist). The CHP or others would run them off - for safety reasons.

What irks me are those who become pushy when you politely say NO.
 
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