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I have owned a 2017 awd hybrid limited for 6 months now - my first toyota. The best my wife and I can get on flat roads feather footing it is 24MPG. Our average driving around town is 21 - which I have checked the pen and paper way. I bought this car because I expected to get the 30 city / 28 highway. Coming from Audi, I was always able to beat their posted estimates. I can't even get close to Toyota's MPG estimates.

Does anyone else have this problem?
Is there any mechanical things I can check for?
 

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I have owned a 2017 awd hybrid limited for 6 months now - my first toyota. The best my wife and I can get on flat roads feather footing it is 24MPG. Our average driving around town is 21 - which I have checked the pen and paper way. I bought this car because I expected to get the 30 city / 28 highway. Coming from Audi, I was always able to beat their posted estimates. I can't even get close to Toyota's MPG estimates.

Does anyone else have this problem?
Is there any mechanical things I can check for?
Hello. I have the 2019 HH and also came from Audi. Like you, I was getting higher MPG with the Audi than the manufacturer sped'd. 30+ MPG on the highway was a regular occurrence.

In the Highlander Hybrid, 29 in the city has not happened and the combined is more like 26. Like you I also used the "pen & paper" method to calculate and I keep the vehicle in ECO mode.

Curious how Toyota calculates the MPG and if others are having the same experience. Thanks for your post. David
 

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Audi was nice because we had VCDS and I could track down the cause of any issues, for example: watch fuel trims, rail pressure, MAF, injection timing etc.. Do you know if Toyota has something similar to VCDS?

I have brand new tires on the car too - filled with nitrogen from costco.
 

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Sorry to hear that. I’m currently getting over 28 MPG with our 2017 HiHy in suburban Houston driving after the last fill up. We just passed the 45K mark since purchasing in the fall of 2017 and we've consistently gotten 26-27 mpg since break-in. Other than a mechanical issue or asking if you’re a pack rat carrying around a lot of excess baggage, I can only ask if you’re using the recommended oil, checked tire pressure and alignment lately, and what temperatures/road conditions are you driving in? Can’t think of anything else if you’re already light on the gas pedal and staying in Eco mode as much as possible.
 

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All maintenance has been done by the dealer. MPG on empty car during daily work commute. Staying in Eco gets us 24 MPG max. Temps measured at ~65-75*F
 

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Discussion Starter #8
36miles highway there. 36 mile highway bumper to bumper traffic return. pretty much flat
 

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You should be doing better, even with winter gas and cold. That's pretty much my commute and I averaged 30 easy in 2012.HiHy Limited AWD.
Something's off. Might be simple things, like air filter. Might be led foot, who knows. As far as you are staying away from city driving and very short trips, you should do better.
 

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2019 Highlander Hybrid XLE
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When temps are below about 50 degrees and/or when your area of the country switches to the winter blend of gasoline, MPG will drop. In July/August I regularly achieved 27-29 MPG but all winter long it's been closer to 23-25 tops. This is normal for Toyota hybrids due to the fact that the ICE must run more often to create cabin heat and keep the catalytic converter warmed up and ready to burn off pollutants.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
23-25 is not 28-30, thats more than 20% off their estimates. The CAT temp is not a factor for long trips because it gets averaged out. The O2 sensor is only accurate within a specified temp range - the car will estimate stoichiometric A/F until O2 sensor is at temp from exhaust heat.

so far only one person is getting the 28-30
 

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The EPA estimates are done at spring/summer temperatures, not winter temps and conditions. They are also done on the regular "summer blend" gasoline. When temps are below 50 degrees the heater is used which forces the ICE to run more often to create heat for the cabin. The Highlander is right on the edge of having to run its ICE in city and secondary roadways so adding the heater pushes it into the regime where the ICE must run more often. Highway speeds, of course, require the ICE to run to prevent overspeeding MG1 at approximately 46 MPH or higher.

You cannot expect to get 27-29 MPG outside of the temperature range and gasoline composition that was tested by the EPA. On a hybrid, the drop in mileage due to these conditions is much more severe than on a non-hybrid. The same wintertime MPG drops can be seen across Toyota's hybrid line, though it is more pronounced on the V6 engine than the inline-4's due to the added parasitic losses in the V6.

Another factor is individual drivers and their ability and willingness to drive the hybrid in a manner that optimizes fuel economy. We don't know how the original poster drives his hybrid. Maybe he has a lead foot. I know I get mileage equivalent to the non-hybrid when I'm towing a trailer, averaging 16 MPH towing a 6 foot wide, 8 1/2 foot tall 2000 pound teardrop trailer. But when I disconnect the trailer I get much better mileage - approaching 29 MPG in mixed highway/secondary road driving when it's warm and the gas is not the adulterated 'winter blend' we get here in New England. Driving around Arizona last month I got much better mileage than I got back home here in Massachusetts.
 

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So you are saying that my 21-24 MPG is acceptable in a 70*F climate I am in? That is a 20% loss. I do not see how the math adds up. n-Butane is added to the blend during the winter to achieve winter vapor pressure specs, and it has the lowest energy content on a volume basis, ~2% difference in energy by volume between the summer and winter blends of gas. Similarly, ethanol blends are not as energy dense by volume. A 10% ethanol blend will net about 96.8% the energy of pure gasoline.

are there any mechanical or software related problems I should be looking for?
 

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Folks, let's not bicker.
We all know that winter time mpg goes down due to winter gas and cold.
Look at my graph. I still had decent mpg winter time and in very challenging terrain, lots of hills. And that in a significantly older vehicle with many more miles.
So his mpg is on the low end. Whatever the reason being.
OP, you can try to improve it by utilizing hypermiling techniques and reviewing the usual bad mpg culprits - heavy loads, under inflated tires, roof racks, aggressive tire tread, so on. Crappy petrol.
 

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No, I never said that. if yours gets that bad mileage in 70 degree weather, there's something wrong with it. Let Toyota check it out. However if you were in the cold northern states, I'd say it was normal.
 

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you guys should not be happy with less than 28-30, we spend $40/50k on a car it should perform as advertised, especially a hybrid, where the demographic purchasing these cars care about fuel efficiency and emissions. I was hopping to come here and find an answer to a common problem, but it seem this is not the case. For example on the VAG 2.0L FSI engines the PVC diaphragms would fail frequently causing idle vibration and drop in MPG.

@ukrkoz
2012 HH AWD Limited weight 4,641 lbs
2017 HH AWD Limited weight 6,260 lbs


24MPG max with hypermilling strategies.
New Tires continental CrossContact LX20 EcoPlus filled with nitrogen at the correct pressure
Zero load, rear row removed = 24 MPG max

"Twelve of the thirteen largest manufacturers selling vehicles in the U.S. market improved estimated real-world CO2 emissions and fuel economy between model year 2012 and 2017. " ?
 

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I didn't buy the 2019 hybrid for the mileage. I knew it was sub-par compared to Toyota's other offerings which is why they changed to the 2.5 liter I-4 for 2020 models. I bought it for the proven reliability, trailer towing capability and lack of required maintenance items that conventional cars require like brakes, transmission fluid, alternators, power steering, air conditioner clutches and belts etc. They don't tell you about that when you're buying a hybrid - it takes many years of experience to find it out. It's not all about MPG you know. I've had a gen-II Prius, a gen-III Prius V, a Gen-III Rav4 hybrid and now the Highlander. So far so good.
 

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Your vehicle weight is incorrect.
2017 is rated at 4,825 to 4,965 lbs
That is my HiHy weight. The only major differentiating factor will be you live in very cold state with very cold winter and me living in PacNW with very mild ones. I also had 6 years of established hybrid driving from my TCH, when I bought HiHy, so my foot is good for hybrids. I even managed to get my RAM with 5.7L to average 21mpg summer time with it.

As you have noticed, particular mpg you are referring is not really a common issue and, speaking from almost 9 years here in hybrid forums, likely has some undisclosed cause.
Unfortunately, does not look like we can help otherwise, sorry about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
6,260 lbs is on my door sticker

for me it was about MPG, that was the deciding factor. I could have spent 10K less for a similar product with 21-24mpg
 
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