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2019 Highlander Hybrid XLE
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47 Posts
6,260 is the GVWR, not the curb weight. Subtract the payload capacity of about 1,300 pounds. Curb weight before adding the trailer hitch then would be 4,960. Add your weight and the weight of 15 gallons of fuel (90 pounds) to get your actual running weight. For me, with the 50 pound hitch, it's more like 5,300 pounds with a full tank and my 200 pounds. Way less than 6,260 GVWR
 

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2012 Prius C3 Black
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58 Posts
In the conditions you mention and your stated driving techniques (featherfooting/hypermiling), you should be doing somewhat better. Have you checked to see if the hybrid battery vent is clogged? A lot of owners forget this little bit if maintenance. If the previous owner lived in a dusty environment or frequently had pets in the car this could be the culprit. I'm not sure where the cooling vent is in your HH. In my Prius it's under the rear seat on the drivers side. Pull off the cover and look inside. There will be a fine mesh filter over the fan. Heat is one of the biggest enemies of battery performance and overall life. How many miles on the car? Do you have access to the maintenance/repair history?

Also keep in mind that the mileage sweet spot for most hybrids is 25-45 mph. Those are the speeds it can run on electric only. Higher speeds even on mainly flat surfaces will require the ICE to kick in. Bumper to bumper traffic is a mileage killer no matter what you drive. If there is another way for you to get to work that involves more back roads without too many stop signs or lights, where your speed will average in the above range, you might give that a try and see if it makes a difference. For example, I used to have a 40 mile commute, and in my Prius I averaged 50 mpg (72mph maximum speed) on the highway half of the trip, and 70 mpg on the other half which was back roads mostly spent in that sweet spot.
 
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