Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What exactly makes the Louvre Museum in Paris so famous worldwide. Also, how did the Louvre become famous in the minds of say Americans even before World War 2, and is there any cultural item like a novel of film that did so.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
I don't know how it became famous, but having been there myself and also being a world traveler I will say don't bother going to the Louve except to say you've been there. I've seen many, many more impressive art museums in the world, not the least of which are the National Gallery in London, the Tate in London, the Musee d'Orsey in Paris, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Heck, frankly, the art museum in St. Louis, Missouri, was/is more impressive than the Louve. And regarding the Mona Lisa? Again, I was not impressed. It's so small, behind so many layers of bullet-proof glass, and you have to struggle and push your way through throngs of humanity just to get close to see an average painting. Go to Vatican City to see the Sistine Chapel if you want to see stunning works of art.

Again, I don't know what made the Louve famous, but regardless the reason IMHO just because one can say some location is a top tourist destination doesn't mean it is worth the visit.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,437 Posts
Any one of those museums is built on colonial theft or war theft or reparations.
How they become famous? Media hype. Just like that guy in Japan, who runs The World Most Expensive Cup of Coffee shop. Basic coffee, but you get certificate that you spent ridiculous money on it.

Kev, I am surprised. No Tretyakov Gallery? No Kunsztcamera? You missing, man.
 

·
Token Aussie
1998 AE102, 2018 ZRE182
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
Is this your homework assignment?
Glad I'm not the only one thinking this after all these posts...

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
Any one of those museums is built on colonial theft or war theft or reparations.
How they become famous? Media hype. Just like that guy in Japan, who runs The World Most Expensive Cup of Coffee shop. Basic coffee, but you get certificate that you spent ridiculous money on it.

Kev, I am surprised. No Tretyakov Gallery? No Kunsztcamera? You missing, man.
Forgive me, I'm a racist, bigoted, homophobic, xenophobic, rapist-in-waiting, guttural, low-brow American male. By nature I operate solely on hate and my own selfish desires to subjugate the rest of humanity. I just couldn't see clearly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Any one of those museums is built on colonial theft or war theft or reparations.
How they become famous? Media hype. Just like that guy in Japan, who runs The World Most Expensive Cup of Coffee shop. Basic coffee, but you get certificate that you spent ridiculous money on it.

Kev, I am surprised. No Tretyakov Gallery? No Kunsztcamera? You missing, man.
What type of media hype was there pitching the Louvre to Americans even before World War 2.
 

·
Registered
2014 HL XLE AWD
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
What exactly makes the Louvre Museum in Paris so famous worldwide. Also, how did the Louvre become famous in the minds of say Americans even before World War 2, and is there any cultural item like a novel of film that did so.
I've been to Paris & visited Louvre before glass pyramid. A lot of history involved, google it
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,437 Posts
What type of media hype was there pitching the Louvre to Americans even before World War 2.
Mass media refers to a diverse array of media technologies that reach a large audience via mass communication. The technologies through which this communication takes place include a variety of outlets.

Broadcast media transmit information electronically via media such as films, radio, recorded music, or television. Digital media comprises both Internet and mobile mass communication. Internet media comprise such services as email, social media sites, websites, and Internet-based radio and television. Many other mass media outlets have an additional presence on the web, by such means as linking to or running TV ads online, or distributing QR Codes in outdoor or print media to direct mobile users to a website. In this way, they can utilise the easy accessibility and outreach capabilities the Internet affords, as thereby easily broadcast information throughout many different regions of the world simultaneously and cost-efficiently. Outdoor media transmit information via such media as AR advertising; billboards; blimps; flying billboards (signs in tow of airplanes); placards or kiosks placed inside and outside buses, commercial buildings, shops, sports stadiums, subway cars, or trains; signs; or skywriting.[1] Print media transmit information via physical objects, such as books, comics, magazines, newspapers, or pamphlets.[2] Event organizing and public speaking can also be considered forms of mass media.


Don't have to be all digital to be "media". Otherwise, it's the same type of "media" that made anything that is related to European aristocracy and royalty popular and sought for in a country, that layed down many of its sons and daughters lives to liberate from exactly that bunch. Just to end up having everything royal, king, queen, marquis, and even aliens speaking with British accent.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
As I indicated earlier, very often the less interesting sites garner considerable hype and become "must see" attractions, while some phenomenal sites get no hype and remain unappreciated.
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
As I indicated earlier, very often the less interesting sites garner considerable hype and become "must see" attractions, while some phenomenal sites get no hype and remain unappreciated.
Agreed. Some of EKAM's pictures of Europe look like they offer more interesting sites to visit than the Louvre. In reality, it's nothing but a tourist trap now, and Paris needs the money.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
I have to admit that in Paris specifically the first time I visited there I expected I'd feel "Meh!" about the Eiffel Tower, but seeing it in person--the intricacy and beauty of the steelwork--and it turned out I was hugely impressed and just couldn't get enough. I visited it daily, once at day and once at night when they do the strobe light display. Very impressive! Other than that, Paris is a terribly dirty city! You have never seen more human spittle, dog shit, pollution grime, and litter per square meter than almost any city on this planet. I'll stand by that statement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
Pop flew under the Eiffel tower in a P47, ferrying planes to France after his 30 missions. Later when he was walking down the Champs Elysee a Frenchman grabbed him and told him to be careful, those crazy Americans like to fly under the base of the tower!! How close was it, not very? 200 feet across at the base compared to the 47 foot wingspan of the P47.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
I have read that Bill Overstreet flew a P-51 under the Eiffel Tower, but have never read that anyone else did it other than a German in a Me-109.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,899 Posts
From what I heard, the Louvre is impossible to see in a day due to it's size.
Only if you want to say you've seen every piece of artwork on hand. Again, your time would be better spent and you'll enjoy many, many more famous and incredible works of art if you visit the Tate, Musee d'Orsay, National Gallery of London, and so forth. IMHO, the Louvre is great in name only.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top