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Hi everyone, I am thinking of lowering my Camry on springs (specifically the Eibach Pro Kit), but have heard that lowering springs would cause my OEM shocks to wear out faster. I do want to improve the handling of my car, but longevity is more important to me (my car currently is at 51,000 miles, planning to drive it till it's no longer worth fixing so hopefully 200,000+ miles). With this in mind, would you suggest forgoing springs for the sake of extending the life of the shocks and other components in my car?

Also, another question I have is how much of a difference/improvement will lowering springs make in the handling of my car? I have ordered the progress rear sway bar (19mm) to reduce body roll and will install them once they arrive, as I have heard they make a noticeable difference and are good value for the improvement you get (correct me if I am wrong). Would lowering springs offer similar bang-for-buck value? Or are they more for the aesthetic and less for the handling improvement?

Btw, might be considering coilovers as well but I do not have the money for them at the moment and I hear that on a daily driver and in an area with many potholes (to give an idea, I have to drive around 40 of them on my daily, 10 minute commute, as well as 15 rough speed bumps getting out of the parking garage) and uneven roads they may be too stiff, but if I am wrong please educate me.

Was thinking about aftermarket rims (RPF1's or Konig Oversteer) and tires as I hear those make a significant improvement in handling, but I want to try staying under the radar by keeping my car's appearance stock (as there are a lot of cops in the area due to living close to a university) so will most likely be staying with the stock OEM 17" rims for now. Especially since I'm prioritizing longevity and trying to balance practicality with better handling, with a friend of mine blowing out a tire and denting a rim going over a pothole last night on aftermarket 18" rims on stock suspension I think I'll leave rims and tires out of the equation for now.

My final question is, besides the rear sway bar and springs/coilovers or wheels/tires, is there anything you would suggest in handling upgrades given my road conditions and goal of keeping the car reliable for a long time? Or should I just stop with the rear sway bar and call it a day?
 

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Hi everyone, I am thinking of lowering my Camry on springs (specifically the Eibach Pro Kit), but have heard that lowering springs would cause my OEM shocks to wear out faster. I do want to improve the handling of my car, but longevity is more important to me (my car currently is at 51,000 miles, planning to drive it till it's no longer worth fixing so hopefully 200,000+ miles). With this in mind, would you suggest forgoing springs for the sake of extending the life of the shocks and other components in my car?

Also, another question I have is how much of a difference/improvement will lowering springs make in the handling of my car? I have ordered the progress rear sway bar (19mm) to reduce body roll and will install them once they arrive, as I have heard they make a noticeable difference and are good value for the improvement you get (correct me if I am wrong). Would lowering springs offer similar bang-for-buck value? Or are they more for the aesthetic and less for the handling improvement?

Btw, might be considering coilovers as well but I do not have the money for them at the moment and I hear that on a daily driver and in an area with many potholes (to give an idea, I have to drive around 40 of them on my daily, 10 minute commute, as well as 15 rough speed bumps getting out of the parking garage) and uneven roads they may be too stiff, but if I am wrong please educate me.

Was thinking about aftermarket rims (RPF1's or Konig Oversteer) and tires as I hear those make a significant improvement in handling, but I want to try staying under the radar by keeping my car's appearance stock (as there are a lot of cops in the area due to living close to a university) so will most likely be staying with the stock OEM 17" rims for now. Especially since I'm prioritizing longevity and trying to balance practicality with better handling, with a friend of mine blowing out a tire and denting a rim going over a pothole last night on aftermarket 18" rims on stock suspension I think I'll leave rims and tires out of the equation for now.

My final question is, besides the rear sway bar and springs/coilovers or wheels/tires, is there anything you would suggest in handling upgrades given my road conditions and goal of keeping the car reliable for a long time? Or should I just stop with the rear sway bar and call it a day?
"Opinions are like assholes, as everyone has one"

On my Sixth Gen HR springs made a slight improvement, on my my 7.5 a slight degradation due to bounciness but esthetics much improved.

Do it, run with it, and make your own decision and let us know.
 

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TN の がしょう
2015 Camry XSE V6
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Long answer short, "YES".

Your OEM shocks will wear out quicker than normal if you install lowering springs.

OEM shocks were not designed to sit lower with smaller springs.

It's up to you how you want to handle it. I usually swap out the shocks and springs at the same time when I want to lower it with "sportier" and stiffer shocks that is somewhat compatible with lowering springs such as Tokico Blues or KYB.

If you're worried about potholes and cops, you clearly have not made the final decision on being serious with upgrading your suspensions.

I will highly recommend you just getting coilovers and calling it a day. It will save you money and headaches in the long run. There are "adjustable" coilovers that you can set ride comfort and height as well. There is a sticky thread that gives you several choices.

Any modifications you make to your car will obviously diminish some reliability and longevity of your car, not to mention it will not have that "stock" look.

If you want to keep the car looking "stock", get lowering springs, better performance summer tires for your OEM 17", RSB, and a FTB if you want to increase the handling aspect of it.
 

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2012 Camry LE
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If you have 40 potholes and 15 speed bumps in a 10 minute daily commute, why spend a lot of money on handling? Unless you're swerving around the potholes like cones on a test track LOL.

Sent from my STH100-1 using Tapatalk
 

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Depending on the height of the speed bumps, lowering might not even be a viable option. I know if I tried to lower mine I wouldn't even be able to get in and out of my driveway unless I had some type of air set up. Too expensive for me.
 
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Curious how you would want to improve handling when you got that much pot holes and speed bumps to tackle everyday.


I drive usually at freeway speeds. We got areas on this island where the roads are trash, so I tend to take my other car if I deal alot in the area. Some of the pot holes are craters spanning about 1 to 2 foot wide and at lease 2-4 inches deep.

I'd check and see how much time you'll be really putting the suspension to make use of it. If you are mostly driving city w/ pot holes, I don't think you'll see benefits of having a stiffer suspension. I can't comment much since I drive a Gen4 w/ stock wheels and lowering Eibach, but the stock 15" tires absorb a good amount of the impact if I do happen to hit one nasty pot hole, can;t say much with the increasing rubber band tires though.
 

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At 50K miles, you should be looking to replace the struts anyways.


I dont think Tokico makes the Blues for Camry, But the KYB is a good option.

Ive had Tokico springs and shocks before and werent bad over a stock set up. But Once you get a set of dialed in coilovers that are balanced, proper sway bar set up, The difference is night and day.



As far as springs wearing shocks faster, its a myth. The springs usually lower the fender 1.5" to the tires. But the struts arent lowered 1.5" as they dont sit on the fender. They sit inside the fender. So the differnce is about 1/2"-3/4" of where the OEM would be. So it's well within the travel aspect of the strut. Usually shocks blow when kids cut springs so the car is slammed on the ground. That changes the whole thing and already worn shocks or struts will probably last a few hundred miles. New struts/springs on cut springs usually last a few thousand miles before they give out.


So as you see, theres alot of myths being circulated. Im on the pro-kit and my car rides fine. A little on the soft side in my opinion as Im used to more sport oriented cars. (hence why I made the swap to springs)



But if it were me, Id just save for coilovers. I wish I wouldve gone the coilover route after getting my springs.. but take all this info down, and make a choice.
 

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^ Uh, 50k, strut replacement?

Why / what planet is that recommended?

I just got ~140k out of the originals (technically, the rear's were "passable" still) in an ['04 AWD] RX330, which has seen heavy feet, trips to the ski hills/cottages. It's a daily duty "beater" not to mention two extreme temp ranges yearly...

My old ES did ~120k, and only the rear's were shot at that mileage, still changed all four corners, because I'm a dummy-head.
 

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Putting new springs on worn struts can be done, but why not just get new ones since theyre already off the car?

Just because you got XXX,XXX milage out of them doesnt mean they dont wear and degrade slowly. 80K is the mark where they should be replaced. If you dont belive me, than search for yourself.

Your not supposed to "use it til it breaks" But If you were to change them at proper intervals you would feel the difference immediately.


You dont notice them wearing as it occurs over a long span of time. But they do wear slowly. With oil-filled struts, external leaks are easy to spot, especially if the leak is rapid. But if it is a very slow leak, it may never be noticed, and with gas-filled struts, external leaks are not identifiable at all. But usually struts don’t fail completely, and usually not all at once. Shock absorber wear creeps up as the internal seals lose their sealing capacity slowly. You won’t notice the difference from one day to the next, but there is probably a minute daily decline in the performance of your shock absorbers as they age.

Not to mention your OEM struts are some of the cheapest made parts out there. These cars are built for profit. Try a set from KYB or another quality brand who's sole direction is to make a quality product and the difference is night and day.
 

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Not to mention your OEM struts are some of the cheapest made parts out there. These cars are built for profit. Try a set from KYB or another quality brand who's sole direction is to make a quality product and the difference is night and day.
Almost all newer Toyotas ride on KYBs, since they are the OE supplier now. KYB doesn't make an AGX or more aggressive strut for the Camry, and there isn't much (practically none) on the aftermarket front from the usual suspects (Bilstein, Koni) for sportier struts for the car. Only thing readily available are replacement KYBs which are just OE replacements.
 

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I always do springs first...then see what you need regarding sway bars. I've never had a problem wearing struts out prematurely, but in theory it can cause more wear.

I think most problems are induced during installation, which has contributed to the myth. There's nothing wrong with using an impact in the strut nut, but you have to be careful not to spin the shaft. That will wear out the seals in the valve faster than a slight reduction in ride height.

Other than that, a lowered car has to be driven more vigilantly. It should go without saying...pot holes, dips, expansion joints, speed bumps pose more of a threat. It's really not even an issue with around a 1" drop on most cars like the Camry.

I just installed the Eibachs yesterday...significant improvement in handling. Ride quality is nearly the same as stock SE/XSE.
 

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You dont notice them wearing as it occurs over a long span of time. But they do wear slowly. With oil-filled struts, external leaks are easy to spot, especially if the leak is rapid. But if it is a very slow leak, it may never be noticed, and with gas-filled struts, external leaks are not identifiable at all. But usually struts don’t fail completely, and usually not all at once. Shock absorber wear creeps up as the internal seals lose their sealing capacity slowly. You won’t notice the difference from one day to the next, but there is probably a minute daily decline in the performance of your shock absorbers as they age.
I agree with this.

In the cars I've personally sat in, if your going for a daily driver, the shocks/struts would start to show noticeable wear around 60-80K, but are still very functional. At around the 100-120K, that is when you'll start to see a degradation in drive quality.

All I know is a car running past 150K on original shocks might get bouncy.

For what it is worth, my 2004 SE I4 5spd w/ 167K has a dead strut in the front passenger and rear driver with the rest of the other following. Besides all the clunking and being a bit bouncy, it's a bit sketchy when making any moderate right bends, especially on the freeway off ramp since the backend tends to loosen out after hitting a patch of rough roads. The same year Camry 2004 XLE V6 with around 108K and softer springs, the suspension feels a lot more planted, but the struts are getting worn out.

For what it is worth, my 1987 Cressida with only 78K on original shocks are worn and blown. Age got to them.

Of course, YMMV based off your location and type of car. If you are going to put lowering springs on your car, I'd just order everything new for the new strut so I can keep the original suspension on the side or sell'em to recoup some cost.
 

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Putting new springs on worn struts can be done, but why not just get new ones since theyre already off the car?

Just because you got XXX,XXX milage out of them doesnt mean they dont wear and degrade slowly. 80K is the mark where they should be replaced. If you dont belive me, than search for yourself.

Your not supposed to "use it til it breaks" But If you were to change them at proper intervals you would feel the difference immediately.


You dont notice them wearing as it occurs over a long span of time. But they do wear slowly. With oil-filled struts, external leaks are easy to spot, especially if the leak is rapid. But if it is a very slow leak, it may never be noticed, and with gas-filled struts, external leaks are not identifiable at all. But usually struts don’t fail completely, and usually not all at once. Shock absorber wear creeps up as the internal seals lose their sealing capacity slowly. You won’t notice the difference from one day to the next, but there is probably a minute daily decline in the performance of your shock absorbers as they age.

Not to mention your OEM struts are some of the cheapest made parts out there. These cars are built for profit. Try a set from KYB or another quality brand who's sole direction is to make a quality product and the difference is night and day.
I wasn't implying on putting new springs on old shocks, at all.

I'm stating my experience with OEM LEXUS parts... [The valving/construction is different than on Toyota products, allegedly as per Lexus & Toyota parts dept & TECH's]

With your argument, we can say the engine, transmission fluid, body panels, clips, etc. are degrading from day to day... Do you replace a transmission "BECAUSE" @ 80k? Fvck no.

Do you replace tires at 15k just because? Fvck no.

Same applies to struts, I'm not sure where or what you wanted me to search but the Toyota & Lexus SERVICE SCHEDULES, as per the manufacturer state "CHECK" the links, suspension, struts for leaking or abnormal wear, etc.

THERE IS NO MILEAGE INTERVAL.....

I'm aware of what you're saying, but people get used to driving and account for this difference in ride with time with the "wearing struts", leaving replacement to be replaced as needed... like in my case, twice.

Guess what, if they started leaking at 80k, I'd replace them. Side note, just had to swap defective struts today, with a whole ~900miles on them... again, because they rode like shit and were leaking.

The difference is very arguable as well... Some guys on the Lexus boards went as far as getting OEM parts, at a cost via those cheap OE supplier websites the struts for a 97-01 ES300 were around ~145$ USD ea [a few years ago now]... Comparable KYB's which were more sporty but a lot more firmer/worse ride and quite a few people hated them were HALF the cost, approx.

So everything you spew isn't necessarily right. I don't know the insides of the camry realm... yet, but I'm sure I'd be able to argue this a lot further than BS'ing "theories" which are like assholes & opinions... especially those found/argued by others off the internet. Much like "whats the better oil for my application" on Bobistheoilguy boards...


I agree with this.

In the cars I've personally sat in, if your going for a daily driver, the shocks/struts would start to show noticeable wear around 60-80K, but are still very functional. At around the 100-120K, that is when you'll start to see a degradation in drive quality.

All I know is a car running past 150K on original shocks might get bouncy.

For what it is worth, my 2004 SE I4 5spd w/ 167K has a dead strut in the front passenger and rear driver with the rest of the other following. Besides all the clunking and being a bit bouncy, it's a bit sketchy when making any moderate right bends, especially on the freeway off ramp since the backend tends to loosen out after hitting a patch of rough roads. The same year Camry 2004 XLE V6 with around 108K and softer springs, the suspension feels a lot more planted, but the struts are getting worn out.

For what it is worth, my 1987 Cressida with only 78K on original shocks are worn and blown. Age got to them.
Case and point, and what any GOOD mech. will tell you anyways.

No need to throw money down the drain for a "theory"...

Camry example isn't the best either.... Both have different suspension/struts combo's in those specs....
 

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Dood seriously, quit posting. your making no sense.

Body panels, clips, transmissions?


You think the Camry transmission has some "miracle" fluid in it that doesnt need changing? This is why they came out with a sealed unit. If you believe their transmissions (which have been failing) dont need regular maintenance done, then those who believe the deaers are in for a rude awakening down the road.

You replace tires, brakes, ball joints, etc.. on regular intervals because why?? These are parts that wear over time and are replaced to keep the vehicle to the original spec.


Parts that wear are supposed to be replaced BEFORE they break.


Case in point:

Worn rotors that are warped with put a vibration in the streering rack and steering wheel. Same with ball joints. If you wait to replace these parts, the seals in the steering rack will prematurely fail and then you will need to replace the rack assembly.


So its either a few dollars now or alot later. Hence why parts have a service life. Replace them BEFORE THEY FAIL and cost you more money.. But since your driving lexus's and such, you have cash to fix this crap, or do what most people do.. sell it/trade it because its too expensive to fix and they dont want to spend a grand, they rather spend a 20-30 grand for a new car.


 
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