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I'm planning to buy my first Toyota Highlander this year and plan to drive it at least 10 years.

The cost spread on the hybrid vs non-hybrid model is only about $1,000.
I drive about 12,000 miles per year, about 33% city.
I'm going to buy a 10 year, 125K mile Toyota platinum extended warranty to take some of the guesswork out of future maintenance costs.
I see that many of the hybrid electrical components are excluded from this warranty.
From strictly a cost standpoint, over 10 years, if I buy the extended warranty, do you think I will do better with the hybrid or non-hybrid model?
Which parts do you anticipate I will need to replace out of pocket?

Thanks for your expertise!
 

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The hybrid, hands down. $1000 over the non- hybrid is an incrdible deal. They used to cost $5000 more in previous years. You don't have to change brakes or spark plugs until over 100k miles, so less maintenance. Besides the $500 to $1000 per year in gas saving, the hybrid will always be worth a couple grand more when you go to resale. I think it has an 8 year 100,000 miles warranty on hybrid components. I have driven two highlander hybrids to 90,000 miles and just bought my third. The first two had almost no problems except a hood latch and a couple of recalls that didn't cost me anything. The only maintenance I had to do was oil change and tires. The value does start to drop pretty quickly once you start getting closer to 100,000 miles( when The warranty expires and you have to start doing higher cost maintenance like timing belt change, spark plugs, water pump, etc)). But even if you keep it past the warranty, you shouldn't have any major problems. Just look at the the thread in this forum where people list their high mileage hybrids.
 

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Take the non-hybrid without the extended warranty. Most bang for the buck and probably better resale after 10 years.
If you go hybrid get the best extended warranty you can.
 

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Warranty:
BTB/Power train 36/60-3/5 whatever comes first
Hybbrid drive 7/100 000 whatever comes first
BUT
If you happen to be in CARB state and buy CARB state licensed car, it's 10/150 000 warranty on battery and one more piece, forgot what it is.
Brake pads do not automatically last 100 000 miles. It varies. Some do into 200 000, some need to be changed much faster.
We have a decent 200 000 miles club here, btw.
On my HiHy I am closing on 500 miles a tank.
It takes dedication and knowledge to use hybrid drive to its best potential. Not everyone wants to or knows how to. City driving is NOT better mpg. Been discussed beyond any sanity. Especially in hard terrain or cold climate. Calc that in.
I am very partial to Toyota hybrids though. So I can not give unbiased suggestion.
personally, I liked Camry Hybrid so much that I bought HiHy in addition. Stellar car.
But say, you want to tow a heavy boat.... That's a no go.
So factors vary.
 

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If you happen to be in CARB state and buy CARB state licensed car, it's 10/150 000 warranty on battery.
Recent purchase of a 2017 Highlander Hybrid XLE in MA - a CARB state - and the warranty for the battery 8 years/80,000 miles. I had a 2007 Nissan Altima Hybrid which had a 10 year/150,000 mile warranty. The Highlander Hybrid is classified a LEV-III SULEV30 emission vehicle - don't really know what that means but warranty is less.
 

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Hybrid-Related Component Coverage[1] Hybrid-related components, including the HV battery, battery control module, hybrid control module and inverter with converter, are covered for 8 years/100,000 miles. The HV battery may have longer coverage under emissions warranty. Refer to applicable Warranty & Maintenance Guide for details.

Straight from Toyota site. I see no change.
 

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Recent purchase of a 2017 Highlander Hybrid XLE in MA - a CARB state - and the warranty for the battery 8 years/80,000 miles. I had a 2007 Nissan Altima Hybrid which had a 10 year/150,000 mile warranty. The Highlander Hybrid is classified a LEV-III SULEV30 emission vehicle - don't really know what that means but warranty is less.
Hybrid-Related Component Coverage[1] Hybrid-related components, including the HV battery, battery control module, hybrid control module and inverter with converter, are covered for 8 years/100,000 miles. The HV battery may have longer coverage under emissions warranty. Refer to applicable Warranty & Maintenance Guide for details.

Straight from Toyota site. I see no change.
Yes - I stand corrected - 100,000 miles instead of 80,000.

8 year/80,000 mile is Federal Warranty and 8 year/100,000 mile is CARB

Not sure what they mean by "HV battery may have longer coverage under emissions warranty" as nothing longer is mentioned in the Toyota Warranty Book that came with my Highlander.
 

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I don't think they did any update on Toyota site, that disclaimer was there for long time.
What it means is that emissions warranty varies across the country. Like it was in case with CARB states.
So what we need to do is to go to CA emissions site and check if THEY changed their warranty. As CA was the one who initiated CARB warranty and then it spread onto several states.
 

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Defects and Performance
Warranty for PZEV only covers vehicles certified to the PZEV (Partial Zero Emission Vehicle) standard
Reference: CCR §1962
15 years / 150K miles (except battery)
10 years /150K miles battery or other energy storage device

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/warranty.pdf
But the 2017 Highlander Hybrid is not a PZEV vehicle - it's LEV-III SULEV30 - which doesn't meet full requirements for the former - at least that's how I interpret the situation IMHO.

Look up a state under "Energy and Environment" tab at:

http://https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=38425&#tab2
 

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But the 2017 Highlander Hybrid is not a PZEV vehicle - it's LEV-III SULEV30 - which doesn't meet full requirements for the former - at least that's how I interpret the situation IMHO.

Look up a state under "Energy and Environment" tab at:

http://https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=38425&#tab2
As a comparison I did both the Highlander and Plug In Prius - Prius gets the additional PZEV classification.



Problem is I can't find any reference to battery warranty for a LEV-III SULEV30 Hybrid on a CARB site - only warranty I can find is in Toyota Warranty Book that came with my Highlander which is 8 year/100,000 mile.
 

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I get it. Yet, Toyota does state that extended warranty is possible based on emission regulations. As quote is from 2017 HiHy Toyota warranty info.
So either Toyota simply blanket slapped this onto every hybrid it makes (quite possible as it's done by developers and may be simply overlooked) or there is some caveat to that.
Or both.
Or neither.
Logically, question should be sent to Toyota now for in detail clarification, except that I am ticked every time I have their response, so I'd rather not.
 

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Didn't think I'd be still be devoting this much time and effort on the subject but I was able to download the 2017 warranty books for both the Highlander and the Plug-in Prius and the warranties are very different.

Highlander Hybrid CA Emission Warranty term:



Plug-in Prius CA Warranty term - PZEV:

 
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