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1998, Toyota, Camry LE, 2.2 L
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Here is where the brake fluid seems to be leaking. This is towards the back of the track that runs along the drivers side that has the brake lines in it.
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· just a nobody
Echo
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9,835 Posts
Take a look at the master cylinder area, see if there is any fluid spilled there!
The area in the pictures contain metal brakelines, unless you had hit them really hard with sharp metal object, hard to imagine it would leak brake fluid there!
 

· Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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3,043 Posts
Leaking from that area is a strong indication the steel pipes have rusted through.

New pipes from the dealer are very reasonably priced, but replacing them is a pain (that plastic holder which runs the length of the car must be opened up to get the old ones out / new ones in).
 

· Registered
2001 Camry LE V6
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191 Posts
Here is where the brake fluid seems to be leaking. This is towards the back of the track that runs along the drivers side that has the brake lines in it.
View attachment 406909
View attachment 406910
I was afraid of this, a common problem on older Toyotas from the rust belt. The only way to fix this is to order new brake lines from Toyota. There is no way to SAFELY patch a brake line. Go to parts.toyota.com and enter your VIN number and search for brake lines. You need the lines that go from the distribution block mounted on the fire wall to the block mounted above the rear suspension sub frame.
 

· 500,000 + Miles
2000 Solara
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931 Posts
I saw the same issue once when I was changing brakes on a friend's car. I got the new pads in, got in the car and pumped the brakes a few times to return the new pads to the rotors and....squish!....one of the brake lines gushed with fluid.
Bummer to have to deal with rusted lines but sure is nice that your line leaked while you were in your driveway rather than out on the highway, maybe when you needed to jump on the brakes for some critical stop!
 
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· Registered
2001 Camry LE V6
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191 Posts
Ok I just did a quick search on Toyota parts website, looks like one line is $80 and the other is $65. That is full MSRP but most online parts dealers discount around 25% or so and orders over $100 have free shipping.
 

· Registered
2001 Camry LE V6
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191 Posts
@Jeff83
Do u think I would be able to undue the connections at either end of these lines without destroying the next link in the chain?
Yep, should have no problem as the flair nut is the part of the brake line assembly that usually causes all of the problems. Ask me how I know:rolleyes: Just use a liberal dose of PB blaster penetrating oil and let it sit for a while before you start trying to loosen the flair nuts. You will also need a set of flair nut wrenches to reduce the likelihood of rounding the flair nuts off and making the job a real mother. The only advantage you will have is that you are replacing the lines so you can escalate to a pair of plyers to get them loose if you have to. The flare nut usually rusts and seizes to the brake line and not in the distribution block.
 

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2020 Highlander Hybrid AWD Platinum, 2012 Camry Hybrid XLE
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113 Posts
I saw the same issue once when I was changing brakes on a friend's car. I got the new pads in, got in the car and pumped the brakes a few times to return the new pads to the rotors and....squish!....one of the brake lines gushed with fluid.
Off topic, but that reminded me of what happened on my very first car, a '62 VW bug. By the time it was over I had replaced the entire brake line system. PITA but I learned a lot in the process. (The first lesson being "Don't buy a rusted out VW Bug"!)
 

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2001 Camry LE V6
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191 Posts
Off topic, but that reminded me of what happened on my very first car, a '62 VW bug. By the time it was over I had replaced the entire brake line system. PITA but I learned a lot in the process. (The first lesson being "Don't buy a rusted out VW Bug"!)
That was my first car too! Lots of push starting with the wonderful 6volt system that never kept the battery charged. Fond memories of the old days.
 

· Registered
1998, Toyota, Camry LE, 2.2 L
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
@new echo owner

I am home from work now. No, I haven't looked over the master cylinder yet. This is under the car kinda where the brake pedal is right? It's tuff to crawl under there without my ramps. They are cracked up now. Any suggestions for a new set of ramps?

I did park the car over a dry area on the driveway and let it sit over night. Spots formed under the area highlighted in the photos and the plastic track was wet with drips forming of brake fluid there too. I'm gonna scope it out again the best I can but I'm pretty beat from work right now.
 

· just a nobody
Echo
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9,835 Posts
The master cylinder is in the engine compartment; Just wondering it fluid might have run down from the top following the brakelines. Not necessary the case, but just want to verify! When it comes to fluid leak, always check from the top down!

If you have a smart phone, you can use the front facing camera and a flashlight to take picture underneath without crawling underneath.

Take you time, rest up first! We will be around when you are ready! Your post will here even if we aren't!
 

· Registered
1998, Toyota, Camry LE, 2.2 L
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I watched a youtube video from "Peter Finn the Car Doctor" on how to check and add brake fluid.

It has started snowing here, but is still light out.

I purchased 12oz of Dot 3 brake fluid for $4.02. I added brake fluid and pumped the brakes, but didn't see anything under the car. I pumped the brakes some more and finally felt some pressure. But again I did not see anything under the car. I pumped the brakes some more. This time when I checked underneath the brake fluid was coming out of the track at the location highlighted in the photos above. A puddle was quickly forming under this spot so I put an old container there to capture the fluid as it drips.

I wedged my self under the vehicale and pulled the track down a bit to see if I could get a better view of the lines in there. The driveway is wet with snow. I can see many rusty crusty deep fissures at the elbows just before before they exit the track and head upwards along the bottom of the car. There is a third line that connects to a rubber house as seen in my first photo. What is that, the gas line? That one looks in same condition as others.
 
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