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Should I buy this car, based upon the info give with updates as seller gets back to me?

  • yes

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • no

    Votes: 1 50.0%

  • Total voters
    2
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I read the posts about this era's engine burning oil without an easy solution.

Before I seriously consider this car, I wanted to check in with you.

It reportedly has 140k miles, but the seller hasn't gotten back to me any present problems, service records, or his reason(s) for selling.

It's a stick shift, which is what I want. From the photos, the cleacoat is peeling badly, the gas cap cover is missing, and the driver's headlight assembly is missing ($20 at the junkyard).

I'll check the oil dipstick for the oil level and quality, and the tail pipe for black soot. Are there any other tests that I can do to determine whether this car is burning oil necessitating
 

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2002 corolla ce
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No test will show the level of oil burning. Whatever you get have it inspected by your mechanic first. I love my 8th gen Rolla so trust me when I say save a bit more and buy an 04 or newer corolla but stick is very rare in these cars. Lots out there but not as abundant as the automatic version.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. I read elsewhere on TN that the some believe that the 7th generation (1993-1997) is supposed to be THE most reliable era. What is it about 2004 and newer Rollas that find as advantageous to 7th generation? And what problem areas might there be with 2004 and newer Rollas? Thanks again.
 

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2006 Corolla XRS
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If you feel that the seller is giving you half truths, assume they are hiding something. Also, you can buy a Carfax report. I believe the 19.99$ one allows you 3 vin reports.

If you still are unsure, then invest in a Bluetooth obdII adapter like a BAFX and pay 5$ for torque pro.

Listen for odd noises, check for oil in the soot of the tail pipe. If there's oil, then it has blowby.
 

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2002 corolla ce
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Every car has issues. The 9th gen has 15" tires, available traction and I think it's quieter. It also has intake issues. There is no perfect car but when you see the next car you will know. Before you buy I can't stress it enough have your mechanic have a look at it. All very general stuff go have a look at many cars
 

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Nothing is perfect.

Do a pre-purchase inspection from a mechanic or heck even toyota dealership.

If neither of those things is feasible, and you have better judgement or $1000 is nothing to you, at least take your obd2 reader.

1) Check the engine bay for any leaks.
2) Check all the inspectable fluids.
3) Check the oBD to see the status of every monitor (the tricks are simple, erase codes before you get there so monitors display not ready) and any pending or historic codes
4) For the oil burning I`d see the paint area of the bumper dirtectly above the exhaust. Usually an oily residue develops when its burning.
5) See how the clutch is.
6) try to see if you can how much tire life is left.

Again a mechanic or dealership can get you a full car health report. Usually Carfaxs are cheap, do one for surity.

Thats about it. I`d assume the buyer has some wiggle room if the paints peeling.

Oil burning is fixable, but the right way is with the teardown $$$$. The oil B12 method, I`m still not sold, although its been documented recently on another thread as a means of justifying a $1k corollla purchase
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Updates: this car has more drama than a soap opera. I'm going to pass, but thanks for your help.

In case you're curious:

I just talked to the seller. who seems honest, but there are some inconsistencies in his story.

He needs money, so he's selling car. He has no repair records, because he hasn't had any work done on the car. Okay, but he bought it in 2017, planned to paint it, didn't, DMV tags expired in 2017, implied that it hasn't been driven since then. Unless someone doesn't need a car (then why buy it?), I can only imagine that there's something mechanical preventing it from being driven.

When asked why the driver's headlight and parking light are missing, they aren't; he took them off to paint the car, but never got around to painting it. He claims to have the parts in hand.

He agreed to smog it prior to purchase.

However, he doesn't understand that tags that expired 3 years ago justifies the cops impounding the car.

I'm leaning toward not buying this car, because it does not appear to be maintained properly, particularly given this era's oil burning problems.

The best case scenario is that somehow the car passes smog, or if it fails, I figure out how much repairs cost (I took an engine performance class last semester so I'm pretty good with diagnosing smog failures), then deduct that repair estimate from the $1,000 offer price AND deduct 3 years of back DMV fees, AND have a mechanic look for other problems ($100 or so for inspection) that I deduct from the $1,000.

That would mean he literally gives me the car for free.
 
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