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If only 1 tire is low the light will come on, so my guess is having only the one original tire in the car wont prevent the warning light.
Dean
The TPMS does not count sensors - if it could it could tell you how many were low and which one - it doesn't. The space saver "Spare" has no sensor since its inflated to 60 lbs.
 

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The TPMS does not count sensors - if it could it could tell you how many were low and which one - it doesn't. The space saver "Spare" has no sensor since its inflated to 60 lbs.
Good to know, thanks! I remember a while back I was reading thru a forum for my sons mazda6, (he has winters with no tpms), and people were putting all the tpms in a pvc tube, then sealing it, then pressurizing with the correct pressure to keep the light off. perhaps that make and model had each sensor registered with the ecu.
So if I understand this correctly, as long as 1 of the registered tpms is there, and none declare a low pressure condition, warning lamp is off?
I am planning on getting a set of inexpensive rims and winters tires this fall for the new Venza, so this is good info.
Dean
 

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The TPMS does not count sensors - if it could it could tell you how many were low and which one - it doesn't. The space saver "Spare" has no sensor since its inflated to 60 lbs.
Here is a cut and paste from a website dedicated to Toyota tpms systems. I doubt I can post the link here! MOD if the paste shouldnt be here please remove with my apologies.

TPMS or a Tire Pressure Monitoring System is fitted to Toyota cars to provide a warning of low pressure on any one of four or five tires on the vehicle (five if TPMS fitted in spare). A TPMS from one of two manufacturers is fitted as part of the valve assembly in all Toyota cars according to the table shown below.
The sensor measures the pressure and temperature in the tire and transmits this data along with the unique ID of the TPMS to the tire pressure monitor ECU/receiver.
If the TPMS ID is logged with the ECU then it is compared with the placard pressure and if under pressure then a warning light is lit on the dash mounted display. Toyota TPMS is also known as Toyota TPWS which means 'Tire Pressure Warning System'.

This makes it sound like "all" the sensors need to be there. Fortunately, there are a lot of months left, to figure this all out before winter
 

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I just cut a dime size piece of black electrical tape and place it over the light when I put my non-TPMS winter rims on. It comes off cleanly in the spring when I go back to my summers. In the winter, you can barely notice it.
 

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TPMS Warning lights

Changed my rims, and of course got the pleasure of seeing this annoying warning light on my dash. Did some heavy research on this issue, and got some promising solutions. Thank the lord the sensors aren't specific on which tire is low like on other vehicles, all it does is focus on the 1 that's under pressure. So my solution is to put one of the sensors in the spare, well actually it was not all my idea, just the combination of other ppls treads. Hope it works, ill get back to ya'll with an update. In the meanwhile i would like to hear if ya'll agree or disagree on my spare tire theory.
 

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I doubt that will work, it needs a response from all 4 tires.. otherwise it trips the warning message.
 

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I doubt that will work, it needs a response from all 4 tires.. otherwise it trips the warning message.
Do you knows this from personal experience? If so, please share.

As for installing tpms sensor in space saver spare......it'll be interesting to find out if it'll fit and if there is any affect by the 60psi in the spare v. 32psi in the regular tires on the receiver.
 

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Do you knows this from personal experience? If so, please share.

As for installing tpms sensor in space saver spare......it'll be interesting to find out if it'll fit and if there is any affect by the 60psi in the spare v. 32psi in the regular tires on the receiver.
I chalk it up to simple common-sense. The system is built to warn the driver of two things.. one warning light for a loss in air pressure when compared to the other 3 tires.. 32/32/32/15 (warn driver possible flat tire).

The other warning is the lack of a response from 1 or all TPM sensors. That way we know that one of the sensors has finally kicked the bucket.

Its a safety system.. it can't rely on only one TPMS signal coming from a spare... it has nothing to compare the reading to.. and therefore will trip the same light. You will waste your time and money hacking in the spare to add the TPMS.

Toyota and other manufactures should really give us the option to flip the whole system off if we want to.. they should know that not everyone wants to have to have two sets of sensors for two sets of wheels. But whatever.... money maker for them if they can get us to buy the sensors for a tiny little light on the dash.
 

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Toyota and other manufactures should really give us the option to flip the whole system off if we want to.. they should know that not everyone wants to have to have two sets of sensors for two sets of wheels. But whatever.... money maker for them if they can get us to buy the sensors for a tiny little light on the dash.
From what I had heard and just saw when I looked it up, it is not a money making scheme from the manufacturers, it is required in the U.S. by law.

"In the United States, the United States Department Of Transportation (NHTSA) released the FMVSS No. 138, which requires an installation of a Tire Pressure Monitoring System to all new passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, and buses that have a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 4,536 kg (10,000 lbs.) or less, except those vehicles with dual wheels on an axle, as of 2007." From Wikipedia.

If this is not correct, please let me know.:confused:
 

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From what I had heard and just saw when I looked it up, it is not a money making scheme from the manufacturers, it is required in the U.S. by law.

"In the United States, the United States Department Of Transportation (NHTSA) released the FMVSS No. 138, which requires an installation of a Tire Pressure Monitoring System to all new passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, and buses that have a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 4,536 kg (10,000 lbs.) or less, except those vehicles with dual wheels on an axle, as of 2007." From Wikipedia.

If this is not correct, please let me know.:confused:
You are exactly correct - this is the fallout from the Ford Explorer/Firestone tire rolloever issue....

Also, the Feds will mandate back-up cameras in all vehicles manufactured in 2014.

2011 Venza:

by your logic, the system looks for 4 happy sensors at or above the minimum pressure threshold - IF it could do that, it'd be able to designate and report any sensor falling below the threshold..... which it does not because the receiver is not that sophisticated. BUT, it would be interesting to prove/dsproved the concept.
 

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TPMS sensors for winter wheels

I purchased a 2013 Venza XLE about six weeks ago. I've been keeping an eye on Craigslist for some spare wheels for possible winter tire use and purchased a set of Nissan Murano alloys for a very good price (18-inch x 7.5-inch w/35mm offset). If I put 245/60-18 snow tires on the rims, the difference between the standard 20-inch tires and the winter wheel/tire set is -.2%, so speedometer/odometer will hardly be affected at all.

If I choose to add TPMS sensors to the wheels (which would probably be on the car for a maximum of four months a year, usually less), I'm guessing that I need to get Toyota OEM or Toyota-compatible sensors so they would match the electronics in the car AND hope they physically fit the rims angle-wise ,etc.).

This seems better than getting Murano-specific sensors and hoping the electronics match the Toyota's ...

Any clues, tips, advice or encouragement on whether or not I'm on the right track would be most appreciated.
 

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I ended up getting a set of aftermarket alloys for ours and had snows mounted without the sensors. If a person can't check their air pressure every so many weeks, you shouldn't be driving a vehicle. Take some responsibilities and do some things for yourself without the government mandating for you. Ok, there's a light on the dash saying something is wrong with the TPMS. If you're smart enough to know why it's on, you should be smart enough why it's on and to ignore the dam thing.
This isn't specifically meant towards you ladd2, but folks in general.
 

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I appreciate you taking the time to answer and we are pretty much on the same page but I am less passionate about it; hence my question containing the phrase "If I choose to ...".

If you have any information specifically answering my question, I would love to hear it.
 

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I have a 2012 Venza AWD V6 and put on replica RTX Lexus 18inch winter rims I ordered from Quebec this past winter. I had my tire store also install aftermarket sensors that (with a special code reader) will clone the codes from the original OEM sensors. This essentially tricks the vehicle into thinking that it is still receiving the OEM codes. This way, you don't have to pay the added cost to reprogram the vehicles computer every time you switch the rims. Never had one issue.

If winter ever ends up here in Southwestern Ontario, I switch back to my OEM 20 inch rims and wheels, and there is no reprogramming that needs to be done and save the $50 to $80.

In Canada it's not mandatory but as far as I'm concerned, it's a safety feature. Much like air bags or seatbelts or an idiot light that your oil is low. Its built into the vehicle that I chose for my family so why would I disable something that could potentially save me, my wife or my young kids. My sensors were $75 each including the scan and programming. $300 over the next 7years which is the usually life span for sensors is about $45 a year. Not even a full tank of gas for the Venza.
I would think that if you pick up a nail in a tire as you are about to merge onto a highway/freeway, checking the air pressure yesterday morning is probably not going to do you much good.
 

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.......
I would think that if you pick up a nail in a tire as you are about to merge onto a highway/freeway, checking the air pressure yesterday morning is probably not going to do you much good.
True, but if the nail creates enough damage, you'll feel or hear the tire blowing out before noticing a light coming on. If its not a fast leak or quick tire failure, you'll pick it up the next day when checking tire pressures.

I agree that TPMS helps promote lazy, clueless drivers along the same lines of people who think driving is a right and not a privilege.
 

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Hi,

Would you be able to share where you got these sensors and the name brand. I haven't bought any winter tires yet, but if I do, I'd would also like to buy a set of the TPMS that can be cloned with the same codes as my existing one so that when the tires are switch, I don't have to get the dealer to reprogram the old codes in.

I have a 2012 Venza AWD V6 and put on replica RTX Lexus 18inch winter rims I ordered from Quebec this past winter. I had my tire store also install aftermarket sensors that (with a special code reader) will clone the codes from the original OEM sensors. This essentially tricks the vehicle into thinking that it is still receiving the OEM codes. This way, you don't have to pay the added cost to reprogram the vehicles computer every time you switch the rims. Never had one issue.

If winter ever ends up here in Southwestern Ontario, I switch back to my OEM 20 inch rims and wheels, and there is no reprogramming that needs to be done and save the $50 to $80.

In Canada it's not mandatory but as far as I'm concerned, it's a safety feature. Much like air bags or seatbelts or an idiot light that your oil is low. Its built into the vehicle that I chose for my family so why would I disable something that could potentially save me, my wife or my young kids. My sensors were $75 each including the scan and programming. $300 over the next 7years which is the usually life span for sensors is about $45 a year. Not even a full tank of gas for the Venza.
I would think that if you pick up a nail in a tire as you are about to merge onto a highway/freeway, checking the air pressure yesterday morning is probably not going to do you much good.
 

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True, but if the nail creates enough damage, you'll feel or hear the tire blowing out before noticing a light coming on. If its not a fast leak or quick tire failure, you'll pick it up the next day when checking tire pressures.

I agree that TPMS helps promote lazy, clueless drivers along the same lines of people who think driving is a right and not a privilege.
I realize that a complete failure would result in very little time to respond to the warning light, but I'm thinking more in the case that you're losing air at a slower pace and now you have 3 fully filled tires and one the is 20 percent less. that would mean three at the optimum 32psi and one around 26psi. I'm guessing that this may cause a problem in a panic stopping situation when road conditions are rated good, never mind the fact when the conditons may be compromised- frozen, wet, puddles, snow covered, etc - like in the winter.
I don't know anybody that checks their tire pressure every few days unless they already know of an issue of losing air. I check mine monthly and I think that's pretty normal. Losing a pound or two psi every week is probably not out of the question if I have a nail that I don't about.
Checking tire pressures is regular maintance much like oil changes and rotating tires. Some people do it religiously, others most of the time, and some very rarely. Some people may see the warning light and disregard it, much like a service engine light. Obviously theres a problem somewhere, but people think that if the car is still moving then all is okay. But others need that light to tell them there's a problem.

The problem is, that the vehicle that is driving beside or behind me at 120 km/hr on the highway with low tire pressure can affect my day too. Will there be a day when there's a sensor on your brake pads and disks warning of less than perfect stopping power? If that day comes, I'm not going to disarm it. I'll accept the fact that it's another tool I have to make decisions about keeping my vehicle in the safest condition possible.
 

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Would you be able to share where you got these sensors and the name brand.
Sure. OK Tire was the dealer which provided and installed my 315 MHz Smart Sensors onto my new winter rims. I'm pretty sure there's more than one company that makes this programmable type such as Orange Electronics, Schrader, EZ sensor. But since they are more knowledgable in this product, I didn't want to insist on one brand over another, but I'm sure they would've accommodated me. They have never over sold me on anything and I trust their expertise. Plus the owner is my golfing buddy.
When I went in to discuss my rims and winter tire mounting, I asked about a solution to the tpms situation. I was prepared to buy the regular type which you would reprogram the vehicles' computer every time you switched out the rims, but they provided this cost saving method. I researched it on the Internet and agreed that this was a perfect solution. I think that these programmable ones are only about 25 percent more than I would have to pay for the regular type. By the time I switch out my rims this spring, I'll already be ahead in the cost savings of reprogramming and my vehicle safety systems are fully intact.
 

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I am surprised that no one has yet come up with a way of disabling the TPWS system in the Venza yet. Looking through this thread I see that "nhcycle" posted some interesting info back in 6 Nov 2011 whereby the RAV4 folks have been able to come up with a solution. Their mod consists of disconnecting the TPWS ECU output to the Combination Meter where the tire warning light resides and replacing that signal with a + 5 volt source (TTL High). Nothe that the warning light is lit by the presence of 0 volts (low) on that line and is turned off by a + 5 volt (high) source.

I recently purchased a 2013 Venza and am still waiting for it to arrive at the dealership. I have had some experience with my wife's Corolla with TPWS and the annoying light that comes on every winter when driving on winter tires/rims. Once my VENZA arrives (next week, hopefully) I plan to add a switch on the TPWS ECU to allow me to enable the TPWS light when using my summer tires and disable the light during the near 6 months of driving on my winter tires/rims.

I have started my research and have determined that the 2013 Venza TPWS ECU is similar to the RAV4 2008-2012 ECU. RAV4 made changes to the TPWS ECU on the 2013 models. I am not sure yet whether 09-11 Venza are using the same TPWS ECU as the 2013 but I suspect so.

With this in mind and a few months on my hands, I hope to have my project completed before the snow flies in the fall of '13. I will keep this forum posted on my progress.
-TM-
 
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