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イリジウム
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You can look up the part numbers on either Denso or NGK's site and order from rockauto. I personally prefer NGK plugs. In either case you don't have to change them for a long time.


And use the rockauto 5% off code if you buy there, scroll to the newest post:


Question for folks on here. What replacement spark plugs would folks recommend or are currently using to replace OEM?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I want to just take the time to say "Thank You" to all the knowledgeable people on here.

I am not a mechanic or an old "car guy" obviously, so I come here to ask questions or get help from people who know more than me.

You all are very knowledgeable and a great resource for fools like me who are just trying to have fun and do the right thing maintaining their car.

Thanks again!
 

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I want to just take the time to say "Thank You" to all the knowledgeable people on here.

I am not a mechanic or an old "car guy" obviously, so I come here to ask questions or get help from people who know more than me.

You all are very knowledgeable and a great resource for fools like me who are just trying to have fun and do the right thing maintaining their car.

Thanks again!
Same here. Only a fool doesn't want to learn ;) So I don't think you are :)
 

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Question for folks on here. What replacement spark plugs would folks recommend or are currently using to replace OEM?
I read a post somewhere said that the NGK spark plugs would last longer than the Denso and more stable but the Denso produce more powerful sparks.
 

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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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I read a post somewhere said that the NGK spark plugs would last longer than the Denso and more stable but the Denso produce more powerful sparks.
NGK doesn't have an applicable spark plug yet... Denso just recently introduced spark plug # FC20HR-Q8 specifically for new Toyota engines.


Also from Denso for 2.0 M20A-FKS engine are Iridium TT IXEH22TT and Iridium Tough VFCH20 (available soon).
 

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2020 Toyota Corolla SE CVT
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They're not due for replacement until you're at 120,000 miles...

OEM spark plugs are Denso FC20HR-Q8

Also available; Denso Iridium TT IXEH22TT and Denso Iridium Tough VFCH20
thank you, I only found some one rockauto but didn’t know the denso #
 

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The iridium OEM plugs last about 120,000 miles, but they should be loosened and retightened every year or two to keep them from getting frozen in the cylinder head.
 

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corollacoaster (#29) is correct. I bought a used 2007 Matrix and waited until ~100k miles to change the plugs, the process of 'seizure' had begun. I sweated bullets as I exerted more and more force on my ratchet, there was some creaking but the plugs all came out. The problem is that the steel gasket on the plug is crushed into the aluminum head, in very close contact. Aluminum is higher in the metal activity series than iron so galvanic corrosion occurs, sometimes it seems as if the plug's hex bolt washer has been welded onto the head.

The following is controversial but upon re-insertion, wipe anti-seize on the threads, start two threads back from the end to avoid burning and use a very thin film with a q-tip applicator; also, wipe a thin film on the washer, remember that the spark plug is electrically grounded by the washer and too much grease is an insulator. On my Yamaha outboard (even with anti-seize) the spark plug washer corroded tight, I snapped the plug ceramic off, now there was a ripped sheet metal hex 'bolt' stuck in the head. Next, an 'easy-out' snapped inside the remaining pipe bore of the spark plug. I have removed that engine head and I am pondering how to get the threaded spark plug pipe out without destroying the threads on the head.

Don't risk it! Loosen and tighten the spark plugs every 20k miles. Some people do not like the anti-seize modification, but I have performed four spark plug changes (400k miles on two Matrix cars) with no problems, you must use a very light anti-seize coating.
 

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Look up CarCare Nut Channel on YouTube. He's a Toyota Master Mechanic in Chicago and tells you about changing plugs. Bottom line, don't bother until at least 100K miles, no need to even touch them until then, and don't use anti-seize.
 

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2020 Toyota Corolla SE CVT
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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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Replaced my set at 80k with the NGK 1406 Laser Iridium today, replacement for the discontinued IXEH22TT
Why did you put in the wrong spark plugs? (NGK 1406 - DILKAR7B11 are for Nissan/Infinity V6 engines)

I already told you NGK does not yet produce a spark plug for your M20A-FKS 2.0 engine!

Why so early? Why do you say Denso IXEH22TT is discontinued?


The only applicable spark plugs for your 2.0 engine are:

Denso FC20HR-Q8 - Toyota # 9091901297

Denso Iridium TT IXEH22TT

Denso Iridium Tough VFCH20

catalog_3_asia.pdf (denso.com)
 

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Why did you put in the wrong spark plugs? (NGK 1406 - DILKAR7B11 are for Nissan/Infinity V6 engines)

I already told you NGK does not yet produce a spark plug for your M20A-FKS 2.0 engine!

Why so early? Why do you say Denso IXEH22TT is discontinued?


The only applicable spark plugs for your 2.0 engine are:

Denso FC20HR-Q8 - Toyota # 9091901297

Denso Iridium TT IXEH22TT

Denso Iridium Tough VFCH20

catalog_3_asia.pdf (denso.com)
Denso 4217 IXEH22TT Discontinued

Also, they cross reference for NGK 1406
 

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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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look I’m not trying to argue but the first link you posted shows the NGK 1406 cross referencing with the IXEH22TT on Denso’s website. So
What you did is a reverse cross-reference from one of Denso's optional spark plugs, by starting with a Nissan spark plug number which is wrong. Its heat range is also different from your original recommended Denso FC20HR-Q8. It may fit and ignite, but it was not specifically engineered for your M20A-FKS engine.
 

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2004 Toyota Camry, 2017 Toyota Camry, and many many more lol
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Yep you already have iridium plugs. Honestly I can’t think of a single car manufacturer today that doesn’t use iridium or ruthenium plugs. The days of copper and platinum in stuff is over pretty much. They still make them for the older stuff of course. I took my Denso iridium in my 2004 Camry to 209,000 before they started missing and needed replacement. I replaced with NGK and today at 279,000 still going strong. Absolutely no reason to replace good plugs.
328286

Here are the 209,000 mile plugs. :)
 

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2016 VW Tiguan SE 4Motion (APR Stage 1, Neuspeed P-flow/wheels)
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They're not due for replacement until you're at 120,000 miles...

OEM spark plugs are Denso FC20HR-Q8

Also available; Denso Iridium TT IXEH22TT and Denso Iridium Tough VFCH20
The stock plugs are already iridium twin tips, and the Iridium Tough would technically be a downgrade since the ground electrode will cause more quenching of the flame kernel, which is why you have the twin tips (aka needle to needle)
 
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